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jen hubley luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • This CEO Thinks Recent Grads Don't Need Work-Life Balance

    Backupify CEO Rob May has some advice for folks just starting out in their careers: forget about work-life balance. To get ahead while you're young, he says, you have be prepared to take jobs you don't like, work harder than everyone else, and essentially leave having a life for later on.

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  • 5 Times You Should Delegate Tasks

    Do you feel like you need to do everything at work yourself, or it won't get done the right way? Chances are, you're overextending yourself, compromising both your productivity and your happiness in your career. So when should you pass the baton, and when should you keep running for the finish line?

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  • 3 Ways to Calm Down in a Hurry

    It's an unfortunate fact of life: the times in your career when you need to be the most levelheaded are also the times when you're least likely to be feeling calm, cool, and collected. Whether it's a big presentation in front of colleagues from another office, or a scary meeting with the boss about a deliverable that didn't get delivered, dealing more positively with anxiety can mean the difference between turning a tricky situation to your advantage and making things worse.

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  • Which College Majors Study the Most? [infographic]

    The average student spends 17 hours a week preparing for class, according to The National Survey of Student Engagement. That includes studying, reading, analyzing data, and doing assignments and lab work. That's far less than the 45 or so hours per week recommended by most schools for students taking 15 credits of coursework, but not every major is equal when it comes to study time.

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  • Microsoft EVP Stephen Elop's Layoff Memo: By the Way, You Might Not Have a Job Next Year

    Yesterday, the hinted-at changes in Microsoft's workforce took shape and heft, to the tune of 18,000 job cuts over the next year. The figure represents about 14 percent of Microsoft's workforce. The majority of those cuts, 12,500 jobs, will come in Microsoft's devices and services unit, which absorbed Nokia last year. How did workers in the mobile unit discover this? In the eleventh paragraph of a memo from former Nokia CEO and current Microsoft executive vice president Stephen Elop.

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  • Fewer Freshman College Students Returning for Sophomore Year

    The rate of first-time college students returning for their sophomore year in 2013 dropped 1.2 percentage points, compared with the entering class of 2009, according to a new report from The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. The retention rate, however remained about the same, meaning that college students who left school were more likely to drop out entirely, and less likely to leave one school in order to enroll somewhere else.

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  • 5 Tips for Finding the Right Mentor for You

    A good mentor can mean the difference between career success and stagnation, but there's a caveat: even the most visionary leader won't be much use to you, if the relationship isn't right.

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  • Amazon Has the Most Attractive Tech Workers

    The makers of Hinge, a dating app that stresses professional affiliations as well as social connections, says that users swipe right for Amazon employees 14.2 percent above the average -- more than Apple, Google, or Facebook, whose network they use to validate user identity. (Ouch.)

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  • Career Stalled? Here's How to Spin It in Job Interviews

    Switching employers every few years might be the way to make more money, but for many workers, the idea of taking a risk on a new job during a bad economy was just too scary. The problem, of course, is that few people work at the same place for our whole careers, retiring with a pension and a gold watch. Eventually, you're probably going to start looking for a new job, and when you do, you'll need to know how to make it clear that you're still a go-getter, despite riding out the recession in one place.

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  • How to Conduct a Sneaky Job Search at Work

    First things first: looking for a new job on the company's time is a bad idea. But sometimes, life intervenes -- for instance, if you work 14 hours a day, and most weekends, it can be hard to carve out time that's really "yours." So what do you do to minimize the risk of getting caught?

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