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Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • Who's Finding Romance at Work?

    Maybe it's because they don't need to flirt in the office when they have a million apps that can connect them with the potential love of their life, but Millennials are the least likely to date someone at work, according to Vault's recently released 2016 Office Romance Survey. The survey showed that 44 percent of Millennials (ages 18 to 34) had engaged in an office romance, while 59 percent of Gen X and 66 percent of Baby Boomers had done so. Of course, the explanation could always be as simple as time spent: the older you are, the more time you've had to fall in love with your cubicle neighbor.
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  • Is Hillary Clinton Right That Americans Haven't Had a Raise in 15 Years?

    During last night's Democratic presidential debate in Milwaukee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said, "I know a lot of Americans are angry about the economy. And for good cause. Americans haven't had a raise in 15 years. There aren't enough good-paying jobs, especially for young people. And yes, the economy is rigged in favor of those at the top." Rigged economy aside, was she correct in saying that Americans haven't seen an increase in pay since the turn of the last century?
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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Beat the Resume Robots and Get Hired

    Before your resume ever reaches human eyes, it has to make it through the Applicant Tracking System, the software program that scans your CV and decides whether you make it to the people part of the hiring process. Understanding how these Applicant Tracking Systems work might mean the difference between getting that first interview and twiddling your thumbs while your resume languishes in the depths of a database. In this week's roundup, we get an inside look at these resume robots, plus learn about time management personality types and find out one reason why your last meeting was a bust.
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  • 3 Facts You Don't Know About #WomeninSTEM

    You know that STEM jobs are heavily male-dominated, and also – generally speaking – high-paying, high-growth occupations. The lack of representation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math jobs is one reason why the gender pay gap persists. You've probably also heard that tech companies are trying various things to create a more diverse workforce, in terms of hiring and promoting women and people of color, from Slack's plan to build tools that catch inequities early on to Salesforce's $3 million commitment to closing its internal gender pay gap. But there's a lot you don't know about the history and current state of women in tech, in particular. Today, on the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, let's take a look at some very nontrivial trivia.
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  • Is a Lack of Leisure Time Holding You Back in Your Career?

    More American women are working full-time, but that doesn't mean that their family lives have caught up. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in households with children under 6, moms put in an hour of physical childcare per day, while dads did 23 minutes. The chore breakdown was similarly unequal; on an average day, women spent 47 more minutes per day on household activities like food prep and laundry. Why is this a big deal? Well, in addition to making it harder for women to put in extra time at the office and get ahead at work, lack of leisure time means less room for creativity and innovation.
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  • Why Your Employer Probably Didn't Have a Super Bowl Ad

    Well over 100 million people watch the Super Bowl each year, and not all are football fans. Some of us are just there for the dip, the excuse to have a party, and yes, the commercials. But, at up to $5 million for a 30-second spot, air time during the big game isn't exactly cheap. As a result, we see a lot of commercials from mega-companies selling soda and beer and pharmaceuticals, and not much from small businesses. (Fun exception: Death Wish Coffee, the nine-person coffee company that won Intuit's Small Business Big Game contest.) What does this mean to you? Well, for one thing, you probably won't see your employer's logo pop up during the Super Bowl, unless your bosses get tickets, deck themselves out in corporate swag, and photobomb the TV cameras.
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  • Obama's Budget Proposal Includes $5.5B 'First Job Funding'

    It's a familiar catch-22 for recent grads: to get a job, you need to have experience, but to gain experience, you need to have a job. In his budget for Fiscal Year 2017, President Obama has nearly doubled the amount of money requested for helping workers find that all-important first job, as well as creating a grant competition to encourage communities to develop plans to employ young workers, and a $2 billion apprenticeship training fund, aimed at doubling the number of apprenticeships in the U.S.
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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: To Be a Strong Leader, Embrace Vulnerability

    When is strength actually a weakness? When it's a facade of toughness, rather than the real deal. This special kind of workplace machismo can keep leaders from asking questions, and when it does, real problems result, both for companies and for the individual who's trying so hard to project strength. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to embrace vulnerability, plus how to get along better with co-workers, and the big mistakes you're probably making on social media, right now.
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  • BLS Jobs Report: 151,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Dips to 4.9 Percent

    The monthly Employment Situation Summary, released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed the addition of 151,000 jobs to public and private, non-farm payrolls, and an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, the lowest in eight years. Prior to the release, economists were predicting the addition of 190,000 jobs. In a mixed report, however, the real good news is wage growth.
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  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 205,000 Jobs in January

    The ADP National Employment Report beat expectations again this month, reflecting the addition of 205,000 jobs to private payrolls from December to January, according to the payroll processor. Prior to the release of the report, economists polled by Reuters were predicting average gains of 195,000 jobs.
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