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jen hubley luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Wisdom From a Professional Matchmaker, Balancing Work and Marriage, and Learning to Love Yourself

    Wish you felt more passionate about your work? Maybe it's time to make Hallmark's favorite random holiday into a celebration of career love, instead. In this week's very special Valentine's Day edition of PayScale's blog roundup, we have insight into dealing with difficult clients (courtesy of a former professional matchmaker), the financial and emotional risks of starting a business with your own funds, and tips for defeating impostor syndrome.
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  • These Cities Are Where Food Service Workers Earn the Most

    When it comes to food service jobs, where you live can be almost as important as where you work. While waiters at Chez Fancypants will almost always outearn counter staff at FastBurger, working in certain metro areas will give you a decided pay advantage. PayScale's Restaurant Report breaks down the highest (and lowest) earning locations for food service workers.
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  • Tipping: A Tough Way to (Not) Make a Living

    An HR manager once told me that he preferred to hire workers who had at least some food service experience on their CV. "No one knows how to work harder than a person who has worked for tips," he told me. But does that hard work translate into a decent salary? PayScale's Restaurant Report shows that the answer is often no.
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  • How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love Failure

    Is there anything more useless than fear of failure? It's vestigial, like the tailbone or the appendix. And yet, humans seem to have an ingrained discomfort with the idea that their efforts won't succeed 100 percent of the time. Here's why you should keep fighting against your nature.
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  • Revolva vs. Oprah: Should You Ever Work for Free?

    In a perfect world, everyone with the passion, skill, and willingness to work hard would have his or her dream job -- and a dream salary to match. Reality, of course, is often quite different. But there's a world of difference between making less than you want (or even less than you're worth) and making nothing at all. And yet, for people in the arts, this is often the pitch: work for nothing, hoping that exposure or another project for your portfolio will lead you to real, paying work down the road. The question, of course, is whether or not it's ever worth it to do so. After all, you can't pay the rent with exposure.
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  • In Praise of the Office Frenemy

    If you're a reasonable person -- and let's assume that you are -- you probably don't expect to love every single one of your co-workers. On the other hand, unless you're a terrible pessimist, or having a really rough patch in your career, you probably also don't expect to hate them all, either. Now, a new study argues that perhaps your most valuable co-worker is the one who inspires both positive and negative emotions in somewhat equal measure: the office frenemy, if you will. Here's why you need the folks you (occasionally) love to hate.
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  • 3 Ways to Take Back Your Weekend

    If you're reading this, you're probably not whiling away the weekend at a ski lodge or even catching your kid's school play. No, instead, once again, you're stealing time from yourself to give back to your employer. If so, you're not alone: according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 34 percent of employed people work on an average weekend day. Still, you'd probably prefer to get some actual rest from your labors; certainly, your productivity would benefit from better work-life balance. Here's how to reclaim your time off.
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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Nice Guys Finish First, Fixing Work Mistakes, and TMI at Job Interviews

    If you've been on a few job interviews -- or even conducted them yourself -- you know that the most qualified candidate isn't always the one who gets the job. Sometimes, it's a matter of which applicant seems like they'll fit in the best, and sometimes it's just a question of who seems like the person who'd be the most pleasant to have around the office.
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  • BLS Jobs Report: 257,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Ticks Up to 5.7 Percent

    Ahead of this morning's report from the Labor Department, economists were predicting a slight slowing of job growth: 230,000 jobs added and an unchanged unemployment rate. Instead, the Employment Situation Summary showed an addition of 257,000 jobs, a slightly higher unemployment rate of 5.7 percent, and a solid increase in average hourly earnings of 12 cents. In addition, November and December's reports were revised upward for a combined total of 147,000 additional jobs, above what was reported.
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  • 'A Man Wouldn't': What Women Need to Know About Negotiating Salary

    Recently, a friend emailed me to say that she had received a job offer from a company she'd been working for on a contract basis. The offer was still taking shape; in a week's time, she'd have to sit down and have the dreaded salary negotiation discussion. Her question was one that PayScale's users ask again and again: what's the magic salary number, the one that will neither cheat the asker nor shut down negotiations entirely? After asking her a few questions about the job and its responsibilities, and factoring in that it was in New York, one of our finest and most expensive cities, I pointed her to PayScale's Research Center to determine a salary range -- and more importantly, a drop-dead number, the salary below which she wouldn't feel comfortable taking the job. "Don't take less than that," I told her. "A man wouldn't."
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