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jen hubley luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • 5 Reasons to Wake Up Earlier (and 2 Reasons to Skip It)

    Could you wake up two hours earlier every day? Rachel Gillett at Fast Company tried it for a week, rising at 6:30 a.m. and tallying up the ways in which it improved her productivity and happiness, both in her personal life and at work -- plus, a few of the challenges involved in resetting her daily clock.

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  • This Job Exists: Professional Writer for Tinder, OKCupid Profiles

    If you have a way with words and yen to help other people make their romantic dreams come true, one Chicago company has the job for you. Virtual Dating Assistants is hiring creative writers to "woo women" on popular dating sites and apps.

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  • 3 Steps to Close Your Personal Skills Gap

    Conversation about the skills gap tends to run on a broad scale: employers want X, workers only offer Y. But what about if you're one of the workers? Your first goal, then, isn't to solve the world's problems, but to fill in your own skills gap and get hired. Here's how.
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  • Who Are the Underemployed?

    Unlike unemployment, which is easy to define, underemployment is somewhat subjective. What constitutes not having enough work? PayScale's recent report examined three major reasons why people describe themselves as underemployed: not earning enough money, not using education or training, or not getting full-time hours. Any way you slice the data, it's clear that underemployment is a common problem: Over 40 percent of respondents described themselves as underemployed.

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  • Vacations Are Good for You and Good for Your Employer

    It's not news that many Americans don't take vacations -- or that they should. But at this time of year, it bears repeating: that last-minute getaway might mean the difference between doing your job well, and stumbling through the day with low energy and a bad attitude.

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  • 3 Time Management Hacks to Make You Better at Your Job

    It used to be common to hear people say, "There just aren't enough hours in the day." Now, there's no point in wishing for an extra 60 minutes here or there; we know that our work would just expand, like a gas, to fit the shape of the container. The real secret to productivity isn't more time. It's using the time we have more efficiently.

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  • 3 Tips for Becoming the Best Boss Ever

    When you look back on your career, you probably remember a handful of managers who stood out from all the rest, some for good reasons, some for bad. If you want to be one of those bosses people remember fondly in years to come -- think A Christmas Carol's Fezziwig, and not The Devil Wears Prada's Miranda Priestly -- here's what to do.

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  • Avoid These 7 Interview Mistakes

    Want to ace your next job interview? It's not just about doing the right things. What you don't do can be just as crucial to getting hired.

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  • Male CEO Steps Down to Spend Time With Family

    When a woman quits her job to spend more time with family, no one bats an eye. When a man does the same, it's news. Earlier this week, Max Schireson announced that he'd be leaving his role as CEO of MongoDB in order to travel less and be at home with his wife and children more. The shock that reverberated throughout the internet is proof, if we still needed any, that men and women have not achieved parity in the business world.

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  • Make Your Twitter Bio Help You Get the Job

    It's hard to sum up the whole of your experience, skills, and passions in a single-page resume. Shorten that to 160 characters, and you have two things: your Twitter bio and a writing exercise that's probably more challenging than anything you've had to do since your last poetry unit in high school English class.

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