Career News Blog » Authors
Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

google plus

Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • Have Trouble Saying No? Get Inspiration From These 5 Quotes

    It's good to lend a hand, especially at work. No one likes that co-worker who never helps anyone out. However, if you're too accommodating, you might find yourself without enough time to get your own work done. Boundaries are important, even necessary. You can't be productive if you don't have any time in which to produce.
  •  
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Avoid These 4 Networking Mistakes at Your Holiday Parties

    During the holiday season, it's arguably easier to make strides toward your next job than it is to find time to do the one you've got. That's because of all the holiday parties, both work-related and non-, that abound during this time of year. There's no better place to do a little informal networking than a holiday party – that is, of course, as long as you've got your head in the game. In this week's roundup, we look at the common networking mistakes you should avoid, plus an argument against travel as a resume builder, and some good news for people who aren't naturally creative geniuses. (Hint: that's most of us, and it's OK.)
  •  
  • Have You Used PayScale's Salary Survey to Negotiate a Raise? Let Us Know!

    Career experts continue to build their case for pay transparency, but as of today, most companies are not on board with showing employees how much their colleagues are making. To get a sense of whether your salary stacks up, you need inside information. That's where PayScale's Salary Survey comes in.
  •  
  • Why Mark Zuckerberg's 2-Month Paternity Leave Is Good News for Working Parents

    Recently, Mark Zuckerberg announced that he will take two months off after his wife Priscilla Chan gives birth. That shouldn't come as a shock: after all, Facebook, like many tech companies, offers a generous paid parental leave policy for both moms and dads. But in a country where paid paternity leave is rare – only 13 percent of dads who took leave after their children arrived received pay, compared to 21 percent of moms, according to the Department of Labor – and chief executives are expected to show leadership by making their companies the unequivocal center of their lives, Zuckerberg's choice to take some time off is almost radical. If it becomes a trend, especially among male CEOs, it could even have positive repercussions for the rest of us in our working lives.
  •  
  • 'How I Make It Work': 10 Working Parents Share Their Coping Strategies

    Does work-life balance even exist? Ask any working parent how they manage to hold down a job, take care of their family, and carve out time for themselves – at least enough to go to the dentist semi-regularly and maybe eat a vegetable now and then – and you're likely to get an earful. The upshot: balance is hard to achieve, hard enough to make many wonder if the whole thing is a myth.
  •  
  • These 5 States Have the Most Full-Time Telecommuters in the US

    Want to work from home? You're in luck. Telecommuting has increased 103 percent over the past 10 years, according to a Global Workplace Analytics analysis of U.S. Census data, and that's not counting self-employed workers. Last year, telecommuting grew by 6.5 percent. In fact, 3.7 million employees (2.5 percent of the workforce) currently work from home part-time or more. If you want to work from home every day, however, where you live might make a difference. FlexJobs recently revisited the Census Bureau's American Community Survey data to determine which states have the most full-time telecommuters.
  •  
  • The Jobs Gap: Why the Uncontrolled Gender Pay Gap Is Worse Than 78 Cents on the Dollar

    On the surface, PayScale's latest report on the gender pay gap seems like good news: when controlled for factors like job title, experience, and education, the data show that women currently earn 97 cents for every dollar a man earns. That 2.7 percent gap isn't the 0.0 percent we'd like, but it's a lot better than the 78-cents-on-the-dollar figure we often hear reported. But, if we look at the uncontrolled data, and compare all working women's earnings to those of all working men, the gap gets significantly larger – 74 cents to the dollar, for a gap of 25.6 percent.
  •  
  • Is the Gender Pay Gap a Myth? 3 Highlights From PayScale's Reddit AMA

    Earlier today, PayScale did a Reddit AMA to discuss its latest report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap. Hosted by PayScale's Vice President of Data Analytics and Lead Economist Katie Bardaro, Senior Director of Editorial and Marketing Lydia Frank, Senior Managing Editor Aubrey Bach, and Lead Data Analyst and Data Visualization Specialist Gina Bremer, the AMA addressed everyone's most pressing questions about the gender pay gap – including the ever-popular, "Isn't the gender pay gap a myth?"
  •  
  • PayScale's Reddit AMA: Inside the Gender Pay Gap

    We often hear the statistic that women make 78 cents for every dollar a man earns, but is that number accurate, and if so, does it tell the whole story? On Tuesday, November 17, at 10:30 a.m. PST (and 1:30 p.m. EST), PayScale will do a Reddit AMA to discuss the gender pay gap. We'll answer all your questions about why women still earn less than men in every industry, and what can be done to fix the problem. Read on for details about how to attend our latest Reddit AMA, and ask our compensation experts anything.
  •  
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is Oversharing Hurting Your Career?

    It's a catch-22: in order to build a successful career in the 21st century, you need a personal brand. In order to build a personal brand, you need to participate in social media. But, the easiest way to tank said personal brand, and possibly your career as well, is to say something dumb online – which is, of course, easy to do, thanks to social media. This week's roundup looks at how to manage the urge to say just a little too much online; plus, how to get noticed for the good stuff, not the bad, and 29 questions to answer to discover the real you.
  •  

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)


Comp Managers: Start Here »
ADVERTISEMENT
SOCIALIZE WITH US
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google Plus Pinterest
JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER
go!