Career News Blog » Authors
Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

google plus

Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is It Possible to Prepare Too Much for a Job Interview?

    Today in, "Apparently, You Just Can't Win," we have an Ask a Manager reader who was told by an HR person that her interview answers were just too perfect. Also in this week's roundup: the best careers for extroverts, and the three types of job interview questions and how answer them.
  •  
  • 5 Last-Minute Halloween Costumes for the Office Party

    It's not like you meant to be the office party pooper. You're busy, and also the month got away from you a bit, and also the thought of venturing into a party store at this time of year fills you with terror more appropriate to the actual zombie apocalypse. Never fear: just because you don't have a Halloween costume at this very moment doesn't mean that you can't get one together by the time the cupcakes are served.
  •  
  • When Job Hunting Turns You Into an Angry Neckbeard

    Job hunting is the worst, and anyone who says otherwise is probably one of those weirdos who love dating. It's a high-pressure situation, with a hefty dose of artificiality, and it demands that you display your best self in a very short period of time. Also, unlike the hunt for the perfect relationship, job searching has high stakes in the immediate future: most of us just do not have the wherewithal to bank the six months of expenses that financial experts tell us we should have. It's no wonder, then, that job seekers sometimes experience psychological fallout from their search, up to and including clinical depression. This makes it harder to get a job. It's difficult to put on a sunny face and look like a person hiring managers should consider when you're feeling, as one Redditor recent put it, "like an angry neckbeard."
  •  
  • How to Get These 5 High-Paying Science Jobs

    Peruse PayScale's College Salary Report, and one thing will immediately become clear: if you are interested in a high-paying job, STEM is the way to go. Of course, picking your college major by salary potential alone is a bad idea. At best, you could wind up highly paid and bored with your life's work. At worst, well, don't forget the old George Carlin routine: "Somewhere in the world is the world's worst doctor. And what's truly terrifying is that someone has an appointment with him tomorrow morning." You do not want to be that doctor ... or engineer, or scientist. But, the good news is that choosing a major doesn't mean building an indelible blueprint for your future; there are, for example, tons of science majors who never set foot in a lab after graduation, and make good money.
  •  
  • How to Add an Hour to Every Day: 5 Timesaving Tricks

    There aren't enough hours in the day. This would be true, even if you lived on Mars. Work expands to fill the time available, no matter how much time you have. At the same time, most of us aren't totally aware of how we're using time – or wasting it. With a few small changes, you can steal back an hour or so of your workday, every day, and use it on whatever you please. (Something non-work-related, ideally.)
  •  
  • Got a Case of the Mondays? 10 #MondayMotivation Tweets to Snap You Out of It

    If perception determined reality, Monday would be as long as the other four days of the standard workweek, combined. Somehow, this is true even though few of us in this age of always-on mobile devices get to unplug for an entire weekend. The good news is that the very same technology that makes work-life balance so hard can also help us cheer each other on. Here's how one strategically deployed hashtag can get you back on track this Monday afternoon. (Or, at least provide you with a more pleasant distraction than your usual procrastination techniques.)
  •  
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What to Do When You Lose Your Job

    Sometimes, losing your job turns out to be the best possible thing for your career, in the long run – but happy thoughts like that are hard to summon up, when you just got your pink slip. In this week's roundup, we look at what to do when you're still in panic-mode, to make things better in both the long- and short-term; plus, how to look good on Periscope, and how to have difficult conversations at work.
  •  
  • This Site Will Tell You Exactly How Much Maternity Leave Your Employer Offers

    When's the right time during a job interview to ask a prospective employer about maternity leave? If you're like most working women, you probably answered, "Never." It's hard enough convincing a hiring manager that a candidate of childbearing years is worth the risk, without giving them an excuse to shut the door on the conversation. This week, Fairygodboss, a site that reviews employers with working women in mind, released its Maternity Leave Resource Center, allowing women to research companies' maternity leave policies before they accept a job offer – no awkward interview questions required.
  •  
  • Justin Trudeau and 5 Other Successful English Majors

    On October 19, Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party won a decisive victory in the Canadian national election. The prime-minister designate assumes office in November, and has already started movement on his campaign promises, but even if you don't care about Canadian politics (or any politics) there are a few interesting things to note about Canada's next prime minister. For starters, liberal arts majors can rejoice, because Trudeau has, among other degrees, a bachelor's in English literature from McGill. There's an answer, the next time your parents ask you, "What are you going to do with that English degree?"
  •  
  • Amazon to New York Times: 'Stack of Negative Anecdotes' Doesn't Represent Amazon Culture

    Two months ago, The New York Times ran a piece on working at Amazon that went on to become its most commented-on story so far, with 6,600 comments by the paper's count. The article depicted a workplace in which 80-hour weeks were common, and work-life balance in short supply. Famously, the reporters cited one former Amazonian who said, "Nearly every person I worked with, I saw cry at their desk." Now, Amazon is responding to that portrait, claiming that the stories included in the article were biased, or presented without context, and that they don't add up to an accurate picture of what it's like to work at Amazon.
  •  

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)


Comp Managers: Start Here »
ADVERTISEMENT
SOCIALIZE WITH US
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google Plus Pinterest
JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER
go!