Career News Blog » Authors
Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

google plus

Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • Spot These 5 Signs of a Bad Employer, During the Interview

    First things first: there's no way to tell, with absolute certainty, what it will be like to work for a company before you sign on the dotted line. That said, you can do your due diligence ahead of time to figure out whether the corporate culture is a good fit for you and up your chances of making the right choice. Research the company on the internet and pay attention to its interactions with employees and customers on social media -- but most of all, watch for these important signs when you meet with the hiring manager during your interview.
  • Depressed and Need Help? Here's Where to Find It

    It's an especially tough time to be having a tough time at work. Thanks to the proliferation of social media and the 24-hour news cycle, anyone with access to a screen sees dozens of references to the latest tragedy every day. Occasionally, those sad stories include a perpetrator who allegedly suffered from mental illness. Leaving aside for a moment the issue of whether or not it's fair for pundits to appoint themselves mental health professionals and diagnose a cause and effect, it's hard to see -- especially if you're feeling less than well yourself.
  • Hey, Managers: Stop Emailing Your Employees at Night

    Mobile technology was supposed to set us free from the tyranny of the 9-to-5, allowing workers to escape the office and plug in wherever they happened to be, and work when inspiration struck. Instead, studies show, improvements in technology have blurred the boundaries between work-time and personal-time, and changed managers' expectations of the managed. In short, many bosses and employers now expect workers to check their email at night, on the weekends, even on vacation. The result? Workers are getting mad, and getting less done.
  • After 'Religious Freedom' Becomes Law in Indiana, Businesses Vote With Their Dollars

    On Thursday, Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, effectively allowing businesses to refuse to serve gay customers. In the days since, some companies have responded by restricting or terminating their investments in Indiana.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! I Tried to Negotiate, and the Employer Pulled the Offer

    When you're evaluating a job offer, it's almost always smart to ask for more money. After all, if you don't ask, most of the time, you won't get. That said, occasionally you'll run into hiring managers who choose to see even a perfectly reasonable request as a personal affront. This week's roundup includes expert advice on dealing with that situation, plus tips on how to build your personal brand and avoid the pitfalls of crafting a college essay.
  • Negotiation Stories: 'The Best/Worst Time I Asked for a Raise'

    When PayScale compiled the Salary Negotiation Guide, less than half of the 31,000 respondents said that they had ever negotiated salary. Why don't more people ask for a raise? For 28 percent of those who declined to negotiate, it was because they felt uncomfortable asking for more money. When you read some of these stories, it will become clear why some people feel that way.
  • 3 Ways Colleges Are Wasting Your Money

    Want to get mad? If you have ever attended or plan to attend college, take a look at a Ted Scheinman's recent Pacific Standard article, entitled How Colleges Misspend Your Tuition Money. The URL, which includes the phrase "pay for decent teachers, not Dr. Phil," gives the first hint of what lies ahead. Hint: it's not a sound investment in teaching staff, but if you've talked to any underpaid, untenured adjunct faculty lately, you probably already knew that.
  • #PayChat Recap: College ROI

    What's the real value of a college degree? Understanding that many benefits of education are intangible, in an era when student loan debt is higher than ever before and post-graduation employment far from a sure thing, most prospective students want to make sure that their tuition dollars are an investment in their future. PayScale's recently released College ROI Report ranks schools and majors by the return students can expect from their investment. In today's #PayChat on Twitter, we asked readers to share their experiences.
  • Why You Should Take Your Paid Time Off

    Forty-one percent of American workers don't take all of their vacation days, according to a study by the U.S. Travel Association, despite the fact that 96 percent of respondents recognized the value of taking time off. Without downtime, workers are less productive, less engaged, and just plain less happy at work. So why aren't we taking all our PTO?
  • Salary Negotiation Fail, Fixed: What to Do When You Accidentally Lowball Yourself

    Is there any part of the interview process that's more horrifying than answering the dreaded salary requirements question? You can dodge it all you want -- and you probably should -- but if the hiring manager won't budge, you'll probably have to come up with some sort of an answer. Chances are, you'll know right away if you named a number that was lower than you could have requested. The gleam in the HR person's eye will tell you all you need to know. The question is, can you improve the situation, or are you stuck with your range?
Find Out Exactly What You
Should Be Paid
Job Title:
Years in Field/Career:
United States (change)
- OR -
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google Plus Pinterest