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Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • College ROI Report: These 5 Schools Offer the Highest Return on Investment

    Money might not buy happiness, but lack of money can sure set you up for a world of misery. Just ask any of the 6.9 million Americans – as of July, 2015 – who hadn't made a payment on their federal students in 360 days. In fact, about 17 percent of all borrowers were severely delinquent in paying their student loans last year. Why? Well, for one thing, it's hard to stay on top of your loans if you can't get a job with a salary high enough to pay them.

    For this reason, PayScale's College ROI Report is a valuable tool for entering students. While of course college choice needs to be based on a variety of factors like career goals, interests, and aptitude, thinking about life after graduation, professionally and financially, is also key. College isn't just vocational training, but if you're going to get into debt, you need to set yourself up to get a job that will allow you to pay off those loans.

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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Master the Sneaky Job Hunt

    The best time to look for a job might well be when you have a job, but that doesn't mean it's easy to engage in a lengthy interview process while you're still employed. This week's roundup looks at ways to do that without tipping off the boss – or at least, without alienating him or her. Also in the roundup: the never-fail job search tips you're probably ignoring, and ways to include testimonials on your resume, so there's no way hiring managers can miss how impressive you are.
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  • 2016 PayScale College ROI Report Shows How Household Income Affects Earnings After Graduation

    The poor often stay poor – even if they're college graduates. This year, for the first time, PayScale's annual College ROI Report looks at how household income prior to attending college relates to income after graduation. In short, students who enter college from lower-income households don't see the same return on their tuition investment as students who start off with more money in their pockets.
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  • #WednesdayWisdom: 5 Career Tips From Successful Entrepreneurs

    Whether you're trying to get promoted or start your own business or just figure out what you want to be when you grow up, sometimes there's no substitute for expert advice. And who better to advise you than some of the most successful entrepreneurs, productivity gurus, and businesspeople in the world? Probably you don't have the ability to call up Tim Ferriss or Sheryl Sandberg and ask them what you should do with your life, but you don't need to. Reading their thoughts on their own career trajectories and the lessons they learned along the way might be enough.
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  • 3 Career Lessons for Working Women From Hillary Clinton (Even If You're Voting for Someone Else)

    Understatement of the election year: Hillary Clinton is a polarizing figure. For some, she's inspirational – potentially the first female president, a woman who can get things done, the most accomplished candidate in terms of raw political experience. People in this camp tend to say things like, "If the presidential race were a job interview, you'd have to hire her, no question." But, then, of course, there's the other perspective, which says that she's not trustworthy, that she's made bad decisions when it counted, and that she might have broken the law. People who agree with this point of view tend to say things like, "She should be indicted." Today, we're not here to talk about whether either of these takes is right. We're here to talk about Hillary Clinton, the leader, and what working women can learn from her – yes, even if they're voting for Bernie or Cruz or Kasich or Trump, or writing in "Wonder Woman" and calling it a day.
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  • Twitter Offers 20 Weeks of Paid Parental Leave for Moms and Dads

    Families were never as "traditional" as politicians or 20th century stereotypes would have us believe. Throughout human history, primary caregivers have come in all shapes, sizes, genders, and ages. Until recently, however, it was pretty hard for even high-earning executives at elite U.S. companies to get paid time off for a new baby – especially if they weren't female and/or hadn't given birth to the child. But all that is changing. Today, Twitter joins the ranks of tech companies like Facebook, Netflix, and Microsoft, in offering fully paid parental leave for any parent who wants time off to care for a new baby.
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  • 125 Companies Where Nearly Every Employee Works From Home

    FlexJobs, a job listing site specializing in work-from-home, part-time, contract, and other flexible jobs, is itself a virtual company – all of its employees work from home, telecommuting from around the U.S. So it makes sense that FlexJobs would track virtual companies that offer not just flexibility, but potentially full-time work-from-home situations. Each year, the site puts out a list of the top virtual companies for telecommuters. This year's list contains a whopping 125 employers, up from 76 last year, and 26 the year before.
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  • New York State Gets Paid Family Leave, $15 Minimum Wage

    Today, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed legislation that will bring the minimum wage in New York State up to $15 an hour over the course of the next few years, and also provide the most comprehensive paid family leave in the country. The family leave policy, which will phase in starting in 2018, will eventually provide for 12 weeks of paid family leave, capped at 67 percent of the statewide average weekly wage.
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  • #MondayMotivation: 10 Pieces of Wisdom on Optimism From Baseball Players

    Yesterday marked Opening Day, the first day of the MLB season, and the last day every baseball fan starts off their morning filled with hope. Traditionally, by the end of the day, some of the more Eeyore-like fans have transitioned from, "Maybe this is our year," to, "This year will be an epic disaster." You're more likely to be one of those if your team lost one of the three games played yesterday, but it's not impossible to develop a glass-half-empty approach even if they didn't play at all. Trust me on this: I'm from Boston.

    As much fun as it is to be a cynic, too much pessimism isn't really good for you. Concentrating on the negative can impact your health, happiness, and even your career. Fortunately, baseball offers a cure, as well as means to develop the disease.

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  • 5 Workers on the Best and Worst Parts of Their Commute

    Commuting is expensive, annoying, and might even impact your health. Still, unless we manage to score work-from-home jobs for our whole careers or win the lottery, most of us will wind up doing it at some time or another. Whether our commute stays a minor irritation or becomes a major stumbling block to our happiness in both personal and professional life depends on a number of factors, including personal preference, traffic patterns, and whether we're able to convince the boss to let us have a flexible schedule.
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