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Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • Yes, the Gender Pay Gap Is Real, and No, It's Not Women's Fault

    Women don't ask, so they don't get. Or: women should wait their turn, and let karma sort it out. Or: women choose low-paying jobs, and/or work fewer hours, so they shouldn't expect to be paid as much as a man. There's just one problem with all of these explanations for why the gender pay gap isn't real, or at least, isn't really an issue that needs solving: they're all nonsense.
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  • The Gender Pay Gap Is Worse for Women of Color

    When we talk about pay inequity, especially on Equal Pay Day, we generally talk about the differences between men's earnings and women's earnings – meaning all men and all women, without regard to race. To really unpack the problem, however, we need to dig further into the data and look at how race and ethnicity impacts earnings. Bottom line: the gender pay gap is particularly bad for women of color.
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  • #EqualPayDay: 10 Quotes to Inspire You to Fight for Pay Equity

    Equal Pay Day is the date when women's pay symbolically "catches up" with men's earnings from the previous year. This year, April 12 is the big day: the average woman has now made as much money, from Jan 1, 2015 until today, as the average man did by New Year's Eve 2015.

    There are a lot of reasons why women earn less than men. PayScale's report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap, show that even in similar roles, controlling for education, experience, and hours worked, women make less money than men. Unconscious bias is a factor, as is "job choice"; women are more likely than men to work at low-paying jobs, and less likely than men to be in leadership roles.

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  • #MondayMotivation: 5 People Who Found Success After 40

    It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking that career success strikes either early or not at all. The media loves stories about wunderkinds who make their mark (and their fortune) when they're barely old enough to rent a car. But your career doesn't stop when you turn 30, or 40, or 50. If you've been putting off following your dreams because you think it's too late to change careers, take inspiration from these famous folks – none of whom were a household name until middle age.
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  • College ROI Report: These 5 Schools Offer the Highest Return on Investment

    Money might not buy happiness, but lack of money can sure set you up for a world of misery. Just ask any of the 6.9 million Americans – as of July, 2015 – who hadn't made a payment on their federal students in 360 days. In fact, about 17 percent of all borrowers were severely delinquent in paying their student loans last year. Why? Well, for one thing, it's hard to stay on top of your loans if you can't get a job with a salary high enough to pay them.

    For this reason, PayScale's College ROI Report is a valuable tool for entering students. While of course college choice needs to be based on a variety of factors like career goals, interests, and aptitude, thinking about life after graduation, professionally and financially, is also key. College isn't just vocational training, but if you're going to get into debt, you need to set yourself up to get a job that will allow you to pay off those loans.

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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Master the Sneaky Job Hunt

    The best time to look for a job might well be when you have a job, but that doesn't mean it's easy to engage in a lengthy interview process while you're still employed. This week's roundup looks at ways to do that without tipping off the boss – or at least, without alienating him or her. Also in the roundup: the never-fail job search tips you're probably ignoring, and ways to include testimonials on your resume, so there's no way hiring managers can miss how impressive you are.
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  • 2016 PayScale College ROI Report Shows How Household Income Affects Earnings After Graduation

    The poor often stay poor – even if they're college graduates. This year, for the first time, PayScale's annual College ROI Report looks at how household income prior to attending college relates to income after graduation. In short, students who enter college from lower-income households don't see the same return on their tuition investment as students who start off with more money in their pockets.
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  • #WednesdayWisdom: 5 Career Tips From Successful Entrepreneurs

    Whether you're trying to get promoted or start your own business or just figure out what you want to be when you grow up, sometimes there's no substitute for expert advice. And who better to advise you than some of the most successful entrepreneurs, productivity gurus, and businesspeople in the world? Probably you don't have the ability to call up Tim Ferriss or Sheryl Sandberg and ask them what you should do with your life, but you don't need to. Reading their thoughts on their own career trajectories and the lessons they learned along the way might be enough.
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  • 3 Career Lessons for Working Women From Hillary Clinton (Even If You're Voting for Someone Else)

    Understatement of the election year: Hillary Clinton is a polarizing figure. For some, she's inspirational – potentially the first female president, a woman who can get things done, the most accomplished candidate in terms of raw political experience. People in this camp tend to say things like, "If the presidential race were a job interview, you'd have to hire her, no question." But, then, of course, there's the other perspective, which says that she's not trustworthy, that she's made bad decisions when it counted, and that she might have broken the law. People who agree with this point of view tend to say things like, "She should be indicted." Today, we're not here to talk about whether either of these takes is right. We're here to talk about Hillary Clinton, the leader, and what working women can learn from her – yes, even if they're voting for Bernie or Cruz or Kasich or Trump, or writing in "Wonder Woman" and calling it a day.
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  • Twitter Offers 20 Weeks of Paid Parental Leave for Moms and Dads

    Families were never as "traditional" as politicians or 20th century stereotypes would have us believe. Throughout human history, primary caregivers have come in all shapes, sizes, genders, and ages. Until recently, however, it was pretty hard for even high-earning executives at elite U.S. companies to get paid time off for a new baby – especially if they weren't female and/or hadn't given birth to the child. But all that is changing. Today, Twitter joins the ranks of tech companies like Facebook, Netflix, and Microsoft, in offering fully paid parental leave for any parent who wants time off to care for a new baby.
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