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Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • The 10 Best Colleges in America

    What makes a school great? Every publication that ranks colleges and universities has its own methodology, usually a combination of test scores prior to entering school and starting salary after graduation. Business Insider, which debuted its seventh annual ranking this week, uses SAT scores per College Board, median starting salary for grads according to PayScale, and feedback from a survey of over 1,000 readers. Their list might not contain many surprises, but it does provide insight into what makes a top school in 2015.
  • When the Boss Loves Meetings, Escape Using This 5-Step Plan

    If you're a manager looking to shorten meetings, there's plenty of advice out there for you. Tips on how to free up your time when you're not the person in charge are a little harder to come by. That's because managers and the people they manage often have two very different sets of priorities: for the managers, every minute spent in meetings is potentially applicable to their goals; for the managed, meetings often represent a desert of productivity, dead time in which nothing gets done. If you're among the latter group, you might feel powerless to change your circumstances – but you're not totally without options.
  • Is Amazon a 'Soulless, Dystopian Workplace'?

    This weekend, The New York Times published an exposé of working conditions at Amazon corporate. Amazonians, the article claims, are required to work long hours, in a data-driven environment that means constant performance evaluations; are expected to answer emails after midnight, sometimes at the prompting of follow-up texts; and are encouraged to inform on one another to management. Workers who don't come up to snuff allegedly are culled in layoffs that a former employee describes as "purposeful Darwinism" – some former employees claimed to have been pushed out after miscarriages or cancer. In an internal memo shortly after publication, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos responded, saying that the company described doesn't match his view of the organization and urging workers to come forward if they disagree.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! My Helicopter Parents Might Sabotage My Career

    Today's parents are pretty involved in their children's lives – often to a degree that seems excessive to those of us who grew up (or raised kids) in the '70s and '80s and were lucky if we knew we knew what a seatbelt was and that cheese didn't naturally form in pre-packaged single slices. Unfortunately, some of these helicopter parents don't let go once their kids graduate and join the work world. In this week's roundup, we hear from one such adult child, plus get some tips on what recruiters want to see on your resume and how to free yourself from negativity.
  • No, Your Company Is Not a Family

    In a perfect world, we'd be honest with our employers and they with us. No worker would ever fudge their previous salary in order to get paid what they deserve; no hiring manager would claim to be out of budget, when in fact they were using it to secure a more in-demand skill set. Perhaps most important of all, no executive leader would ever tell this corporate fib: "Our company is just like family."
  • The 10 Worst States for Student Loan Debt

    The class of 2015 is the most indebted to date, with student loan debt adding up to almost $68 billion total, including federal and private loans. The average graduate will have to pay back $35,000, according to data analysis by Edvisors, and the student loan default rate hovers around 13 to 14 percent. While politicians debate the best way to combat student loan debt, or mitigate its crippling effects, individual students must decide the best way to minimize their debt load. A recent WalletHub report reminds us that where students live can be an important factor in determining how much money they owe – and how quickly they're able to pay it off.
  • Bad News, Men: Robots Are Coming for Your Jobs, Specifically

    The robots are coming, and they're going to scoop up some, most, or hardly any of our jobs, depending on which expert you're listening to and which data they're using. What a potential automated takeover would mean for mankind is up for debate, but recent research shows that it's probably mankind, and not womankind, that needs to worry. If robots do take over our jobs, Oxford researchers say, they'll come for the ones that are most often done by men.
  • 3 Happy Reasons People Quit Their Jobs

    Very few workers stick around until retirement, collect their pension and their gold watch, and ride off into the sunset. This is mostly because there are no pensions, watches now bear Apple logos and will be updated every six months until the earth is swallowed by the sun, and retirement comes whenever you're past age 60 and get laid off. In fact, the average worker stays at a job only 4.6 years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. But, that doesn't mean that every reason to quit is bad news.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Rebound From Burnout

    Feeling totally done with work today? Unfortunately, it's probably not time to go home yet. Worse, maybe your problem isn't just a "today" issue – burnout can sneak up on you, and knock out your productivity for quite some time. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to prevent and overcome burnout, plus methods for dealing with academic isolation, and how to do just one thing that will make your boss love you forever.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 215,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Unchanged at 5.3 Percent

    After a relatively soft ADP report, tallying the addition of 185,000 jobs to private payrolls in July, this morning's release of the Employment Situation Summary from the labor department is good news. The report, which includes government jobs as well as those in the private sector, showed that total non-farm employment increased by 215,000 jobs last month, just shy of the 223,000 jobs predicted by economists. Unemployment was flat at 5.3 percent.
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