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jen hubley luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • Are We Ready for a World Without Resumes?

    Updating resumes and writing cover letters can feel like an insurmountable obstacle in the job hunting process, even when you're desperate for a new gig. For one thing, it's hard to see typos or inconsistencies once they've been introduced, making the process dull at best and frustrating at worst; for another, well, it feels weird to pitch yourself so openly. Wouldn't it be great if we didn't have to deal with resumes and cover letters at all?

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  • How to Look for a Job When You Have a Job

    The best time to look for a new job might be when you're already employed, but that doesn't mean it's easy to manage the process when you already have a full plate. Here's how to find a new gig without getting fired from your old one.

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  • Negotiate for These 10 Things When There's No More Money

    Ask anyone what they want in a new job, and money is sure to be at the top of the list. Most negotiating advice is geared toward that, offering tips on dealing with the question of salary history, figuring out how much you're worth, and asking for more than an initial low-ball offer. But what do you do when there's no more wiggle room, but you still want the job?

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  • Avoid These 8 Resume Fails [infographic]

    Recruiters spend an average of six seconds looking at your resume. Sadly, this seems to be long enough to catch even the tiniest typo, but not long enough to unearth the relevant experience you modestly placed in paragraph two.

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  • 5 Ways to Boost Employee Loyalty

    Let's get one thing straight right off the bat: smart employees aren't loyal to their employers anymore. If the past few years have taught us anything, it's that there's no such thing as job security. But there are ways for you, as a manager, to improve your reports' commitment to the organization. Here's how to do it.

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  • Job Relocation Checklist: Do These 5 Things Before You Move

    The hardest part of moving for work is deciding to take the plunge. Once that's out of the way, you're dealing with details. Of course, how you handle the little things that go into your relocation can make a big difference to your quality of life in your new home and at your new job.

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  • 5 Ways to Change Careers Without Starting From Scratch

    When we talk about career changes, we often speak in leaps, e.g. lawyers who become history teachers or executives who leave big business to start their own mom-and-pop shops. But what about the smaller career evolutions, the kind that don't require a lot of extra education or training to effect? Here's how to make a career change that's a lot easier and less frightening than jumping into a strange new occupation.

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  • 3 Common Pitfalls of Work Friendships

    The benefits of work friendships are pretty clear -- a sense of belonging, a positive corporate culture, improved communication and commitment to the team -- but that doesn't mean that having friends at work is totally without risk. Here's how things can go wrong, and what to do to make them right.

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  • Is the Skills Gap a Myth?

    In a recent Manpower survey, 40 percent of employers said they had trouble finding qualified applicants for open jobs. On the other hand, David Nicklaus at The St. Louis Post-Dispatch points out, we have a 6.2 percent unemployment rate -- better than the recession, obviously, but still "too high in the sixth year of an economic recovery." How can we account for the simultaneous existence of a high unemployment rate and employers who say they can't find workers qualified for jobs?

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  • Here's Why Robots Might Not Take Our Jobs

    Robots have been taking jobs from humans for decades now, replacing bank tellers with ATMs, cashiers with self-checkout machines, and factory workers with mechanized assembly lines. The fear, of course, is that the bots will grow so intelligent -- and low-maintenance from a management perspective -- that they'll replace us altogether. In a recent New York Times column, Neil Irwin explains why that might not be as likely as some naysayers predict. Why? For one thing, robots don't have a lot of common sense.

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