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jen hubley luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • How to Give Negative Feedback

    No one likes negative feedback -- either receiving it, or giving it. In fact, we might hate giving constructive criticism more than getting it; leadership development researchers Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman found that while 92 percent of respondents to a survey valued corrective feedback, most managers felt uncomfortable giving it. Comfort levels aside, it's obviously unlikely for performance to spontaneously improve, without direction from leaders. So what can you do, as a manager, to offer negative feedback that leads to positive results?
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  • #SOTU 2015: Middle-Class Economics and Expanding Opportunity

    "The shadow of crisis has passed," said President Obama, in last night's State of the Union address. "And the state of the union is strong." While receiving standing ovations for job numbers (and getting in an ad-libbed dig at Republicans about winning the presidency), Obama outlined a vision for the country that focused on middle-class growth.
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  • 21 Pieces of Career Advice We'd Give Our Younger Selves

    If you could go back in time and give your younger self career advice, what's the one thing you'd say? For some, it would be to negotiate a higher salary or start investing more heavily in a 401k. Others might go all the way back to college and follow their dreams -- or pick a career with a better occupational outlook, and fund their personal projects that way.
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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Don't Stalk the HR Manager

    Sometimes, the job interview process feels like the worst parts of dating. So much depends on having good instincts and good luck, and no matter how clever you are, you're always going to be plagued with at least a little self-doubt. This week's roundup kicks off with advice that will help job seekers avoid overdoing the follow-up after an interview. (Plus: tips on goal setting after your New Year's resolutions fail and more insight into why the gulf between older and younger workers sometimes seems so huge.)
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  • The Minimum Wage Increased in 20 States This Month

    In 20 states and the District of Columbia, the New Year meant higher wages for the lowest-paid workers. For states like Arkansas, Hawaii, Maryland, Nebraska, South Dakota, and West Virginia, the hike means that minimum-wage employees will make more than the federally mandated minimum of $7.25 an hour for the first time ever.
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  • Negotiating Salary? Don't Forget About Benefits

    Ask anyone who's ever paid out-of-pocket for their health insurance: benefits are important. It's too bad, then, that we often overlook benefits when we're negotiating salary. PayScale's recently published Salary Negotiation Guide examines all the factors that go into making up a compensation package that reflects your skills and experience, not just base pay. Keep these in the back of your mind the next time you're negotiating an offer, and you could wind up earning more, saving money, and enjoying better work-life balance.
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  • This Is What's Stopping You From Getting the Salary You Deserve

    More than half of respondents to PayScale's salary survey have never negotiated their salary, according to data gathered for our recent Salary Negotiation Guide, despite the fact that 75 percent of those who asked received a bump in pay, and 44 percent even got the entire sum they requested. Furthermore, research suggests that many of the non-negotiators consider themselves to be underpaid. So why don't people ask more often?
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  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Make Big Changes, Forget About Self-Sufficiency, and Stay on the Boss's Good Side

    New year, same old career? If you ever needed proof that January 1 is just a day on the calendar, the week after the holidays might provide it. But just because the beginning of a new year isn't automatically a new start at work, doesn't mean that you can't use the fresh page in your planner to inspire you to make changes, large and small, that can make 2015 the best year of your career so far.
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  • BLS Jobs Report: 252,000 Jobs Added, But Wages Remain Soft

    This morning's release from the Labor Department showed an increase of 252,000 jobs, beating economists' expectations of 240,000 added jobs, and a decline in the unemployment rate from 5.8 percent in November to 5.6 percent in December. This is the lowest unemployment rate since June, 2008. In addition, last month's blockbuster report was revised upward from 321,000 jobs to 353,000 jobs. Wages, however, actually declined slightly from last month.
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  • How to Negotiate a Raise in 2015

    Why is it so scary to ask for what you deserve, especially when it involves a dollar amount? For one thing, we live in a society where talking about money is considered tacky, as is blowing your own horn. To get the salary that's appropriate for our experience, skills, and capabilities, you need to get comfortable doing both. PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide helps you feel more secure asking for a raise or establishing your starting pay by breaking the process into three parts: research, strategy, and negotiating.
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