Career News Blog » Authors
Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

google plus

Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • Economist on Revised Jobless Claims: Numbers Suggest 'Not Much Slack Remains in the Labor Market'

    This week's jobless claims were lower than expected, but that's not the biggest economic news this week. That honor goes to the revised claims for the first week of March, reports Business Insider.

    "Most of the changes were relatively modest, but the most notable aspect of the revisions is that claims for the week of March 5th (3 weeks ago) were revised down to 253,000 which is, as far as we can tell, the lowest weekly claims figure since November 24, 1973," writes Thomas Simons, senior economist at Jefferies. Simons called this "a remarkable statistic and it continues to suggest that not that much slack remains in the labor market."

  •  
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Be a Superhero Manager

    "I have to go to work tomorrow," a friend of mine recently informed me. "And the worst part is, I'm still not Batman." For most of us, work is a far cry from superheroics, unless you count being able to endure an interminable meeting without sighing a feat of strength. (And sometimes, it is.) But as the lead story in this week's roundup shows us, being good at managing is a superpower – but one you can develop over time, with no origin story required. Read all about that, plus the assumptions you should stop making about LinkedIn, and the ways in which your brand will change over time, in this week's post.
  •  
  • Amazon Reveals Pay Data After All, Shows Virtually No Gender Pay Gap

    Earlier this week, the Securities and Exchange Commission rejected Amazon's request to keep their pay data private, after Arjuna Capital filed a shareholder resolution to request that data. Yesterday, Amazon announced that it will share pay data – and that women at the company currently make 99.9 cents for every dollar male employees earn. Amazon also revealed that minority employees make 100.1 cents for every dollar earned by white employees.
  •  
  • Are Millennials Changing the Culture of Work?

    What the boss says, goes. Don't put anything online that you wouldn't print out and hang over your desk. Don't expect a free lunch, or a fast promotion, and always remember: your mama doesn't work here.

    Those are the old rules of corporate culture, and most of us – especially if we were born before ubiquitous internet – agree that they're still the smart way to go. After all, what is etiquette, but a way to keep from driving our neighbors crazy, whether those neighbors live across a driveway or on the other side of a cubicle wall?

  •  
  • 5 Ways to Avoid Answering the Worst Job Interview Question, 'What's Your Salary History?'

    First things first: anyone who tells you that you can always dodge the salary history question is probably trying to sell you something. The reality of the situation is that sometimes, you just can't wriggle out of answering this question – not if you want to stay a viable candidate for the job. But, that doesn't mean that you should name your price right away. You might be able to get the hiring manager to focus on the future, not the past, and that's what you're hoping for.
  •  
  • Everything You Know About Being Successful Is Wrong

    "Research shows that the kind of happiness that does lead to long-lasting fulfillment is the kind of happiness that's derived from positive social relationships with other people," says Dr. Emma Seppälä, the Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. "A life of meaning, a life of purpose, a life characterized by altruism, something greater than oneself."

    A life, in other words, that can feel pretty difficult to create in today's corporate culture, which prizes achievement and productivity. But maybe there's another way to live and work. Seppälä's new book, The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success, examines research on happiness, and makes the case that finding fulfillment builds success, not the other way around.

  •  
  • When an Occupation Becomes Female-Dominated, Pay Declines

    During any debate about the gender pay gap, one argument will eventually emerge: women make less than men because they choose lower-paying jobs. But what if it turns out that women aren't so much choosing low-paying jobs as working at jobs that are low-paid precisely because there are more women in those occupations? If that sounds far-fetched, one study, recently discussed at The Upshot in The New York Times, might change your mind. Researchers analyzed 50 years of U.S. Census data and found that pay drops when professions move from predominantly male to female – in short, if women do a job, it's likely to be low-paid, for no other reason than that women's work is undervalued.
  •  
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do You Feel Trapped in Your Career?

    The average person changes jobs 10 to 15 times over the course of their career, and spends less than five years at each job. Harder to figure out: how many times they change careers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn't track it, and many changes are pretty subtle anyway, as career paths naturally evolve over time. Sometimes, however, you have to make a leap. In this week's roundup, we look at what to do when you need to make a big career change, plus resume rules you should stop breaking, and ways to beat burnout.
  •  
  • How to Enjoy March Madness Without Driving Your Co-Workers Crazy

    March Madness is upon us – whether that's good or bad depends on your feelings about college basketball, your workplace's culture around sports, and your need to get stuff done between now and April 4. Ideally, you and your co-workers would all be able to enjoy the bonding potential of debating the merits of your favorite teams, without turning the office into a locker room or annoying your colleagues who would choose unpaid overtime over courtside seats.
  •  
  • 7 Ways to Change Your Career Luck, Starting Today

    When it comes to your career, there's a lot that's outside your control. You can't make a job opening appear when you really need one, or keep an awesome boss from transferring to another department, or boost the budget for raises and the opportunities for promotion. At the end of the day, pretty much all you can control is yourself and your behavior. The good news is that sometimes, that's enough.
  •  

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)


Comp Managers: Start Here »
ADVERTISEMENT
SOCIALIZE WITH US
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google Plus Pinterest
JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER
go!