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Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • Justin Trudeau and 5 Other Successful English Majors

    On October 19, Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party won a decisive victory in the Canadian national election. The prime-minister designate assumes office in November, and has already started movement on his campaign promises, but even if you don't care about Canadian politics (or any politics) there are a few interesting things to note about Canada's next prime minister. For starters, liberal arts majors can rejoice, because Trudeau has, among other degrees, a bachelor's in English literature from McGill. There's an answer, the next time your parents ask you, "What are you going to do with that English degree?"
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  • Amazon to New York Times: 'Stack of Negative Anecdotes' Doesn't Represent Amazon Culture

    Two months ago, The New York Times ran a piece on working at Amazon that went on to become its most commented-on story so far, with 6,600 comments by the paper's count. The article depicted a workplace in which 80-hour weeks were common, and work-life balance in short supply. Famously, the reporters cited one former Amazonian who said, "Nearly every person I worked with, I saw cry at their desk." Now, Amazon is responding to that portrait, claiming that the stories included in the article were biased, or presented without context, and that they don't add up to an accurate picture of what it's like to work at Amazon.
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  • Office Horror Stories: The 10 Scariest Co-Workers Ever

    What's more terrifying that than the scariest ghost story you've ever heard? Going to work with some of these folks. We asked Facebook users to share their tales involving co-workers whose bizarre and unprofessional behavior made the fact that they had jobs stranger than fiction. These stories will remind you that the real-life experience of going to work offers plenty of scares – no ghosts or goblins necessary.
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  • Your Standing Desk Is No Healthier Than a Regular Old Sitting Desk, Study Finds

    Bad news, standing-desk fans: according to a study from Exeter University and University College London, you're getting sore feet for nothing. After following 5,000 people over the course of 16 years, researchers determined that standing desks are no better for your health than standard ones. Being still, they contend, whether standing or sitting, is bad for your health.
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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Build a LinkedIn Profile Recruiters Will Love

    LinkedIn is a rare bird in the social media landscape: it's extremely useful for its specific purpose – building your career – but not necessarily a place to hang out online, like Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. As a result, it's easy to let your LinkedIn profile slide when you get a promotion or take on new responsibilities, and not realize it until the absence of recruiter attention calls the issue to mind. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to make your LinkedIn profile shine, plus why being a good helper isn't always the best thing for your career, and a few tips on getting unstuck when you're in a rut.
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  • To See How Few Women There Are at the Top, Photoshop Out the Men

    If you watched the Democratic primary debate last night, one thing probably stood out to you, regardless of your political leanings: Hillary Clinton was the only woman on the stage. In fact, as far as American politics is concerned, one out of five is just about the norm: currently, women hold 104 out of 535 seats in Congress, a 19.4 percent average. (It gets worse if you look at women of color – 31.7 percent of the number of women, and just 6.2 percent of the total.) Of course, we love data, but numbers can seem abstract. Sometimes, you can't beat a good visualization to really see the problem. Recently, British Elle's feminism issue gave us just that, with a video that shows men gradually removed from photos of politics in action ... leaving just a few women behind.
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  • 3 Sneaky Downsides of Working at Home (and How to Handle Them)

    Working at home can be a dream or a nightmare, depending on the job, your preferences, and the disposition of your colleagues. It's pretty easy to find guidelines to making a telecommuting situation a success: you know you need to keep your boss in the loop, for example, and make sure your co-workers can see that you're really working. But, what about those pitfalls that arise only once you're comfortably ensconced in your brand-new home office? Here's what you can expect.
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  • We Are All the Urban Outfitters Employees Who Were Asked to Work for Free

    Last week, Gawker reported that URBN, the Philadelphia-based company that owns Urban Outfitters, Anthropologie, and Free People, sent out a memo asking salaried workers to volunteer their weekend time, unpacking boxes during the October rush. But don't worry: the memo made it clear that this was a "team-building activity." Furthermore, lunch would be provided.
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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Beyonce Can Teach You About Job Interviews

    If you've ever experienced stage fright before a job interview, you'll see the parallels between performing and interviewing for a new job. Unless you're someone who loves being the center of attention, however, you might not think of that as a positive thing. In this week's roundup, we look at why one expert takes job interview inspiration from Beyonce; plus, some insight into the "9-to-5" workday in 2015, and a love song to the to-do list.
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  • LinkedIn Sent Your Friends Too Many Emails, and All You Got Was $1,500 (Maybe)

    Whether it's the canned kind or the sort that involves male enhancement products, spam is generally worthless – unless the spam in question came from LinkedIn, and arrived in your potential connections' inboxes repeatedly, with your name and without your consent. In that case, it might be worth a share of a recent $13 million settlement.
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