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jen hubley luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt writes about work-life balance, stress management, and other topics relating to what makes us happy at work. A full-time freelancer, she deals with stress by blurring the lines between life and work to the point where the two spheres are barely separate. The happiest day of her career was when scientists proved that looking at pictures of cute animals makes us more productive.

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Most Recent Posts by Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
  • The Most Important Part of the Job Interview (That You're Probably Forgetting)

    If you're at all interested in getting a given job, you prepare thoroughly ahead of time, researching the company and position, doing practice interview questions, even choosing your interview outfit with special care. But there's one thing you probably aren't doing, and it might be costing you the job: odds are, you probably haven't given a thought about how to close the interview.

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  • The 5 Things Great Managers Do Every Day

    If you've ever left a job because of a bad manager -- and you wouldn't be the first -- you know that having a good boss is an essential factor for job satisfaction and productivity. If you've ever managed everyone yourself, you know how hard it is to do well. Sometimes, it's hard to even understand what managing well entails. But recent analysis from Gallup shows that managers who do certain very specific things improve employee engagement, benefiting both workers and the company.

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  • 5 Ways to Be Luckier at Work

    Even if you're not particularly superstitious, it's easy to ascribe the things that happen to you in your career to luck (either good or bad). In fact, you can make your own good luck at work, just by making a few simple changes in your life.

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  • Another Great Reason to Help Others: It'll Help Your Career

    "Nice guys finish last." It's the real-life version of reality TV's favorite canard, "I'm not here to make friends" -- and it's probably just as useless as a personal motto. In his recent article in The Atlantic, Adam Grant argues that doing good things for others can have real benefits for your career -- eventually.

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  • 5 Ways to Kill Productivity in Your Next Meeting

    Ah, meetings. Ostensibly a way to communicate decisions, brainstorm ideas, and keep the team running in the same direction, they are also one of the better ways to allow productivity to grind to a halt. Ideally, we'd all make the best of meetings, and avoid behaviors that waste everyone's time and the company's money. In reality, of course, many of us are guilty of at least one of the following:

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  • How to Lead When You're Not the Boss

    Managing people when you're actually in charge of them is far from easy, but at least you have a variety of carrots and/or sticks to bring into play. When you're the technical lead on a project, but not actually the boss, things get confusing in a hurry.

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  • No More Written Resumes?

    Gone are the days when choosing card stock was an essential part of the resume process. Sure, you probably print out a couple couples of your CV to bring with you to job interviews, but for the most part, resume distribution takes place electronically. Thanks to social networking, LinkedIn in particular, formal resumes -- even electronic versions -- are less important than they used to be. Will there ever come a time when we do away with them altogether?

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  • Treadmill Desks Make Employees Better at Their Jobs (Eventually)

    New research shows that treadmill desks improve employee performance and productivity -- after a short period of adjusting to walking and working at the same time.

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  • Senate Reaches Bipartisan Deal on Long-Term Unemployment Benefits

    Yesterday, the Senate announced a bill that would extend unemployment benefits for the two million Americans whose benefits lapsed in December, for a period of five months.

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  • Female Professor Negotiates, Then Loses, Job Offer

    Women routinely fail to negotiate starting salaries and benefits, out of fear that their future employers will think them greedy and rescind the job offer. Most of the time, experts tell us, there's nothing to worry about. And then, every so often, there's a story like this.

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