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jennifer wadsworth

Jennifer Wadsworth

Jennifer is a Bay Area-based journalist who writes about politics, current events, career news and social issues. She lives in San Jose, Calif., with a blue heeler dog named Blu and an African grey parrot called Dorian.

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Most Recent Posts by Jennifer Wadsworth
  • Watch Out: Student Loan Rates are About to Double

    While college costs continue to mount, the rate of federally subsidized student loans is on track to double by July 1. That's if Congress doesn't act in time. Will lawmakers do something about it and come up with a spending plan? Or will millions of millennials get royally screwed?
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  • Why are Accounting Jobs So Hard to Fill?

    As the world becomes increasingly interconnected and the economy more complex, the demands of top professions have become broader and more nuanced. That's certainly true for accounting and finance jobs, which now require so much more than rote number crunching. But that change in expectations makes it difficult for companies to fill those roles.
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  • Does Age Affect Productivity?

    Does productivity decline with age? A recent study suggests otherwise, claiming today's generation is actually earning less and not as likely to obtain as many academic credentials as workers older than 60. Boy, how times have changed.
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  • Report Highlights Hidden STEM Economy

    Science, tech, engineering and math (STEM) careers justifiably get a lot of ink as critical to the economy, the driving force of the future. Half of all those jobs don't even require a bachelor's degree, which is good news for the majority of working-class adults. Yet public policy and public spending doesn't prioritize that half of the STEM workforce. Of the $4.7 billion of federal cash spent on job training, only a fifth of it goes toward training for jobs that don't require a bachelor's.
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  • Is Diversity Declining in Top Professions?

    A half-century after the advent of affirmative action, diversity in the nation's top professions appears to be stagnating. An analysis by the New York Times includes startling figures showing that the percentage of black doctors and architects, to name a couple fields, has remained the same for two decades.
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  • Sheryl Sandberg on Gender Inequality, Women in Tech and Free Speech

    Sheryl Sandberg famously instrumental in Facebook's success also struck up an important national discussion about gender equality in the workplace. The tech giant's chief operating officer recently spoke with the Wall Street Journal's All Things Digital about what's changed and what still needs changing after book "Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead" too the world by storm.
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  • 3 Promising Ideas for Immigration Reform

    Those in favor of immigration reform like to talk about the value of high-skilled immigration, the kind with degrees and training and impressive work experience. But think about young Steve Jobs and how he would have appeared to immigration authorities: a college drop-out, a rebel, a hippie. Motivated, sure. But technically skilled? Who'd have guessed?
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  • Women are Increasingly Both Breadwinners and Caregivers

    As more women join the workforce and climb the corporate ladder they're more likely to fill the role of family breadwinner. Yet those professional advancements come without without the luxury to relinquish any of their traditionally held caregiver responsibilities, like shuttling kids to and from school, taking care of doctor appointments and housework, according to a Pew Research Center study released Wednesday.
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  • The 10 Toughest Jobs to Fill This Year

    Forty percent of employers in the U.S. have job vacancies, but can't find the skilled workers to fill them, according to the latest skills survey from staffing agency ManpowerGroup. For those of you hiding under a rock for the past half-decade, that's what we call the skills gap. The disparity between employers' need and workforce ability.
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  • Fashion Models Strut Into U.S. More Easily Than Engineers

    If you're tall, thin, gorgeous and make a living off those traits it's easier to get an American work visa than university-trained engineers. A puzzling 20-year-old decision by Congress allowed models to be included in the H-1B class of visas, an oversight that has led to relatively preferential treatment for foreign-born beauty over brain.
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