• Should You Tip More at the Holidays?
    While many people still quibble about how much to tip their server at a waitress (psst, it's generally 15-20 percent for good to outstanding service) there's even more debate around what to tip at the year's end. Even if you don't celebrate a winter holiday, the end of the year is nigh, and your paper boy is coming around for his two dollars, plus tip.
  • Have You Used PayScale's Salary Survey to Negotiate a Raise? Let Us Know!
    Career experts continue to build their case for pay transparency, but as of today, most companies are not on board with showing employees how much their colleagues are making. To get a sense of whether your salary stacks up, you need inside information. That's where PayScale's Salary Survey comes in.
  • Why Mark Zuckerberg's 2-Month Paternity Leave Is Good News for Working Parents
    Recently, Mark Zuckerberg announced that he will take two months off after his wife Priscilla Chan gives birth. That shouldn't come as a shock: after all, Facebook, like many tech companies, offers a generous paid parental leave policy for both moms and dads. But in a country where paid paternity leave is rare – only 13 percent of dads who took leave after their children arrived received pay, compared to 21 percent of moms, according to the Department of Labor – and chief executives are expected to show leadership by making their companies the unequivocal center of their lives, Zuckerberg's choice to take some time off is almost radical. If it becomes a trend, especially among male CEOs, it could even have positive repercussions for the rest of us in our working lives.
  • Report: Student Jobs Should Build Careers After Graduation
    The financial reality facing today's college students is pretty different than it was decades ago. First of all, the cost of higher education has skyrocketed. The price of attending a private, nonprofit, four-year college, for example, has more than tripled since 1975. And, while the image of the full-time, parent-supported college student who starts working only after completing her degree was never the only reality for students, today's learners must deal with the fact that they can't even hope to work their way through school. Worst of all, perhaps: the student jobs they're likely to find won't boost their careers after graduation.
  • How to Drop Out During the Job Interview Process
    There are a lot of reasons why you might decide not to continue with the interview process, as a candidate: the role is no longer what you thought it would be, you have a huge conflict that's just come up and you cannot make it to the interview, you have a job offer from a different company, etc. But how do you get out of an interview, without completely ruining your chances with the hiring manager or the recruiter?
  • 'How I Make It Work': 10 Working Parents Share Their Coping Strategies
    Does work-life balance even exist? Ask any working parent how they manage to hold down a job, take care of their family, and carve out time for themselves – at least enough to go to the dentist semi-regularly and maybe eat a vegetable now and then – and you're likely to get an earful. The upshot: balance is hard to achieve, hard enough to make many wonder if the whole thing is a myth.
  • These 5 States Have the Most Full-Time Telecommuters in the US
    Want to work from home? You're in luck. Telecommuting has increased 103 percent over the past 10 years, according to a Global Workplace Analytics analysis of U.S. Census data, and that's not counting self-employed workers. Last year, telecommuting grew by 6.5 percent. In fact, 3.7 million employees (2.5 percent of the workforce) currently work from home part-time or more. If you want to work from home every day, however, where you live might make a difference. FlexJobs recently revisited the Census Bureau's American Community Survey data to determine which states have the most full-time telecommuters.
  • Why Pay Transparency Is a Good Thing
    Would you feel better about your less-than-market salary if your boss talked to you about how the company structures pay? Maybe. PayScale survey data from 71,000 U.S. employees show that workers who are paid less than the market rate for their jobs were more satisfied if their employer was transparent about their pay, as this Bloomberg Business piece points out. When someone actually sat down with workers and talked to them about compensation, their job satisfaction numbers more than doubled, rising from 40 percent to 82 percent.
  • What to Do After You've Botched a Job Interview
    If you've ever interviewed for a job, chances are, you've probably made some mistakes. It's what you do afterwards that makes the difference between an embarrassing cautionary tale and a story of triumph. Recovering from serious missteps can be tricky, but it's not impossible. You need some presence of mind and tact to handle your bungled situation. Here are a few tips that may be helpful.
  • How to Network at Holiday Parties
    As the holiday season approaches, so do the holiday parties. These events bring up mixed feelings for most of us. In a way, look forward to the parties, anticipating that they'll be at least a little bit fun, but there is also so much to do around this time of year, and extra social events can feel like a waste of time. But, holiday parties are actually rife with opportunity – not just to enjoy ourselves, but to do a little professional networking while we're at it.
  • Should You Work on Black Friday?
    Even if you don't work retail, your office might be open on the day after Thanksgiving (lots of places are). Ever since the creation of the holiday, it's fallen on a Thursday, and while we celebrate it as a federal holiday, the day after isn't a given paid day off. So, if you're choosing between taking an unpaid day or putting in a slow day at the salt mines while your family gathers at grandma's for leftovers, how do you decide?
  • 3 Things You Should Know About the Connection Between Money and Happiness
    We all know that money, ultimately, can't buy happiness. True contentment and fulfillment comes from family, community, health, love, purpose ... but it's also true that being broke isn't much fun either. Surely a billionaire would feel happier, on an average day, than someone who's really struggling financially. This is a fair assumption, but it's only true to a point. Let's look at some research concerning wealth and happiness to try to understand the relationship between the two a little bit better.
  • 4 Things to Do While You're Waiting to Hear Back After an Interview
    Yes, it is an excruciating experience, waiting to hear back from the company after a job interview. Did you make it? Did you falter? Do they want to move forward with your candidature? It's a period of thumb-twiddling and nail-biting, but you can do something on your end, instead of just ending up with swollen fingers and uneven cuticles.
  • The Cities With the Lowest Unemployment Rates
    A variety of factors contribute to our understanding regarding the current state of the economy. It's not a simple issue. One indicator stands out though as especially significant, at least as far as many working Americans are concerned: unemployment rates. And, this fall, it seems we've been getting some good news.
  • How to Be a Real Mentor
    If you've been approached to mentor someone, you've been given an amazing opportunity to guide your mentee's career, to impart your wisdom, to help them in their aspirations. In addition to being recognized for your achievements, and being valued for your experience, the opportunity to mentor someone relatively new in their career can be a mutually enriching association.
  • Not Getting Hired Online? Blame the Robots
    If you've been applying online for jobs you know you're perfect for and not getting anywhere, sadly, you're not alone. With the move by many HR departments big and small toward Applicant Tracking Systems (a.k.a. ATS applications), your application might be getting lost in the computer shuffle. Here's how to get around our robot overlords.
  • The Way We Worked: What Our Workdays Looked Like 50 Years Ago
    It's Throwback Thursday, so take a ride through history as we learn what the workplace was like for lumberjacks, meter maids, and airline stewardesses 50-plus years ago. Spoiler alert: a lot has changed.
  • 5 Signs You're in a Toxic Work Environment
    Even if you absolutely love your job, there's always going to be something about it that you wish you could change. That's the ideal scenario; if you're lucky, you have an issue or two that you'd like to resolve, but nothing that impacts your job satisfaction as a whole. On the other hand, if your problems are beyond minor complaints – if you feel threatened, suffocated, or compromised on your principles, work ethic, or professional and personal well-being – you may be working in a toxic environment.
  • Music for Productivity: Match Your Tracks With Your Tasks
    Look around any office today and you will squint to find more than a handful of people without their ears plugged into headphones. With that said, most people would agree that music helps them work better throughout the day. But did you know that you can legitimately match your music tracks with your tasks, for optimal productivity?
  • The Jobs Gap: Why the Uncontrolled Gender Pay Gap Is Worse Than 78 Cents on the Dollar
    On the surface, PayScale's latest report on the gender pay gap seems like good news: when controlled for factors like job title, experience, and education, the data show that women currently earn 97 cents for every dollar a man earns. That 2.7 percent gap isn't the 0.0 percent we'd like, but it's a lot better than the 78-cents-on-the-dollar figure we often hear reported. But, if we look at the uncontrolled data, and compare all working women's earnings to those of all working men, the gap gets significantly larger – 74 cents to the dollar, for a gap of 25.6 percent.

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