• 3 Facts You Don't Know About #WomeninSTEM
    You know that STEM jobs are heavily male-dominated, and also – generally speaking – high-paying, high-growth occupations. The lack of representation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math jobs is one reason why the gender pay gap persists. You've probably also heard that tech companies are trying various things to create a more diverse workforce, in terms of hiring and promoting women and people of color, from Slack's plan to build tools that catch inequities early on to Salesforce's $3 million commitment to closing its internal gender pay gap. But there's a lot you don't know about the history and current state of women in tech, in particular. Today, on the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, let's take a look at some very nontrivial trivia.
  • The 4 Best Cities to Find a Job
    The unemployment rate has been steadily improving for a few years now. The latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, a figure we haven't seen since 2008. Although there are still some concerns about whether or not pay is also on the rise, the job market seems to be improving – but not everywhere. When it comes to finding a job, some cities offer more opportunity than others.
  • Is It Ever OK to Tell the Boss You're Looking for a New Job?
    The employee/boss relationship is a tricky thing to nail down. You might think that everything's friendly, but things could change on a dime once you announce that you've got one foot out the door. What should you do to keep that friendly vibe going (and ensure you get a good recommendation in the end)? Think about it, before you blab to your boss that you're outtie-5000.
  • Say This, Not That: 5 Ways to Stop Apologizing at Work
    As an introvert in the office, I constantly feel the need to say "sorry" every time someone has to go out of their way for me. This is not only a problem in the workplace, but a problem outside the workplace, too. Think about it, fellow introverts: do you remember the last time you were at a restaurant and you had to ask the waiter to fix your order because they gave you chicken pot pie instead of turkey pot pie? Let's be real – you probably felt bad about asking them to fix it, and you probably apologized to your waiter. The next time you're in a situation like this, especially at work, follow these tips to help yourself speak more articulately and positively.
  • Phasing Out Tipping Culture Could Reduce Workplace Harassment
    It's been dubbed the glass floor by some, and accepted as a reality of the American economy by many: tipping often makes up the bulk of pay for employees in the food service and hospitality industries. In fact, in many states, it's legal to pay tipped employees as little as $2.13 an hour, the federal tipped minimum wage. As a result, servers have to rely on customers' good graces to make up their paycheck – a situation that often leaves tipped workers vulnerable to sexual harassment.
  • How to Get Promoted When You Work From Home
    An increasing number of Americans telecommute, at least part of the time. In 2014, 23 percent of the employed population did some or all of their work from home on days that they worked, according to the American Time Use Survey. Technology has freed workers from the need to constantly toil away at the office, but that flexibility is not without its challenges. For one thing, it can be hard to get ahead when the boss never sees your face.
  • Is a Lack of Leisure Time Holding You Back in Your Career?
    More American women are working full-time, but that doesn't mean that their family lives have caught up. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in households with children under 6, moms put in an hour of physical childcare per day, while dads did 23 minutes. The chore breakdown was similarly unequal; on an average day, women spent 47 more minutes per day on household activities like food prep and laundry. Why is this a big deal? Well, in addition to making it harder for women to put in extra time at the office and get ahead at work, lack of leisure time means less room for creativity and innovation.
  • 62 People Have as Much Wealth as the Poorer Half of the World's Population
    Worldwide, the rich are definitely getting richer. How bad is it? A recent Oxfam report, An Economy for the 1%, highlights just how stark wealth inequality has grown across the globe. Let's take a look at some of the highlights from the report and learn why the growing gulf between rich and poor is bad for everyone.
  • Jack of All Trades Finds Permanent Solution for the Common Resume
    When it comes to making resumes, there are certain standard techniques for helping your CV rise to the top of the stack, like using the right format for the industry, keeping it to one page, and making sure you're presenting your most relevant experience first. But if you find the maintenance of resumes too tedious, and you like tattoos, this Redditor has one solution you really have to see for yourself.
  • 5 Reasons Why Your Employer Should Embrace Diversity
    Building a diverse company isn't just the right thing to do; according to research from Bersin by Deloitte, it's also pretty good for business. In a recent article for Forbes, contributor Josh Bersin wrote about why smart companies are making diversity and inclusion a top priority. Here's why your employer should be on board.
  • Are 'Gigs' Really That Great?
    Being a freelancer is anything but free. Sorry to be a downer, but it's true. If you don't plan for the unexpected, you might be shocked when you overdraw from your bank account or spend way more than 40 hours a week at this job you thought was going to be a breeze. Take stock of the realities of gig life before you make the jump.
  • Why Your Employer Probably Didn't Have a Super Bowl Ad
    Well over 100 million people watch the Super Bowl each year, and not all are football fans. Some of us are just there for the dip, the excuse to have a party, and yes, the commercials. But, at up to $5 million for a 30-second spot, air time during the big game isn't exactly cheap. As a result, we see a lot of commercials from mega-companies selling soda and beer and pharmaceuticals, and not much from small businesses. (Fun exception: Death Wish Coffee, the nine-person coffee company that won Intuit's Small Business Big Game contest.) What does this mean to you? Well, for one thing, you probably won't see your employer's logo pop up during the Super Bowl, unless your bosses get tickets, deck themselves out in corporate swag, and photobomb the TV cameras.
  • Here's What Millennials Want From Their Workplace
    Millennials, on more than one occasion, have been called the "me, me, me" generation. So when you're part of that generation, and you read a title like the one for this article, it may be tempting to think, "Here we go again: another post telling me how much I want a bean bag chair in my office." But the fact of the matter is that last year, millennials replaced Gen X as the largest share of the U.S. workforce. As a part of that emerging majority, you're entitled to seek out the kind of employer that's best for you. As a matter of clarity, here are some signs that your current or potential employer has the pulse of millennials, and where there may be a red flag.
  • Age Discrimination and the Battle for Equal Pay in Michigan
    Michigan lawmakers have proposed a bill that has local teenagers in an uproar – and for good reason. Senate Bill 250 would reduce minimum wage from $8.50 to $7.25 an hour for all workers under the age of 20.
  • Plan Your Interview 'Go Bag'
    Getting word that you have an interview is an exciting thing ... so much so that you might just lose your head a bit. What you need to do is be prepared, so that if an interview comes up at a moment's notice, all you have to do is grab your "interview go bag" and it'll have everything that you need to make a great impression and get that job.
  • One Company Offers a Work-Life Balance Solution for Moms: Part-Time Jobs
    Being a working mother in America is no easy feat. Not only are there extremely limited or no paid leave options for a vast majority of working parents, but the high cost of childcare and long American workday force many women to leave their careers behind to care for their children. One company is trying to change that for working mothers. How? By giving moms the opportunity to work part-time.
  • Obama's Budget Proposal Includes $5.5B 'First Job Funding'
    It's a familiar catch-22 for recent grads: to get a job, you need to have experience, but to gain experience, you need to have a job. In his budget for Fiscal Year 2017, President Obama has nearly doubled the amount of money requested for helping workers find that all-important first job, as well as creating a grant competition to encourage communities to develop plans to employ young workers, and a $2 billion apprenticeship training fund, aimed at doubling the number of apprenticeships in the U.S.
  • Are Attractive People Rewarded With Better Grades and Higher Earnings?
    We know that motivation, talent, and maybe a little bit of luck are a great recipe for success, but what if there are other factors at play as well? Does a person's level of attractiveness impact the trajectory of their career? Let's take a look at some of the latest research and information on the topic to discover whether or not attractive people are rewarded professionally for their looks.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: To Be a Strong Leader, Embrace Vulnerability
    When is strength actually a weakness? When it's a facade of toughness, rather than the real deal. This special kind of workplace machismo can keep leaders from asking questions, and when it does, real problems result, both for companies and for the individual who's trying so hard to project strength. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to embrace vulnerability, plus how to get along better with co-workers, and the big mistakes you're probably making on social media, right now.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 151,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Dips to 4.9 Percent
    The monthly Employment Situation Summary, released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed the addition of 151,000 jobs to public and private, non-farm payrolls, and an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, the lowest in eight years. Prior to the release, economists were predicting the addition of 190,000 jobs. In a mixed report, however, the real good news is wage growth.

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