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  • We Are Never Ever Ever Saying These Work Cliches Again
    Make the absurd "business jargon" end now. Let's all stand up, raise our right hands high, and swear that we'll be the change we want to see in the world. Let's all agree that jargon never helps a project get completed, a deadline met, or a co-worker promoted.
  • The 5 Highest Paying Bachelor's (and Associate!) Degrees
    Very few students choose their major from a list of top-paying degrees. Even if financial considerations are paramount in your decision process, you'll probably start by examining your strengths and interests. In other words, you might not choose your major for love, exactly, but you don't want to sink time, effort, and money preparing for a career you won't enjoy. That said, there's value in knowing which degrees are most likely to net high-paying jobs for their recipients. PayScale's College Salary Report ranks the highest paying associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees – because no matter what you decide, knowing is better than not knowing.
  • 5 Tips for Managing Difficult People
    Whether you manage four people or 400, chances are, you consider that part of your job the most challenging. Supporting, training, and motivating others while holding them accountable is tough, even if you work with a dream team. But, when someone difficult enters the mix, it can feel downright impossible.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 190,000 Jobs in August
    This morning's employment report from ADP fell short of economists' expectations, showing the addition of 190,000 jobs to private payrolls. Prior to the release, economists polled by Reuters were predicting 201,000 jobs added. July's report was revised downward to 177,000 jobs from 185,000.
  • The Shocking Reality of Maternity Leave in the US: 1 in 4 Women Take Only 2 Weeks Off
    Two weeks. 14 days. That's the entire length of maternity leave that most American workers take when their child is born. And, it seems some of us are shocked by that fact. After all, we're all protected by the Family and Medical Leave Act, right? Since 1993, the FMLA has ensured 12 work weeks off in a 12-month period, but that doesn't sync up with the reality that nearly 25 percent of women are forced to return to work after two weeks.
  • How to Become a Problem-Solver at Work
    We love to complain. In 2013, an article from The New York Times revealed that of customers who bought a product and were dissatisfied with it, 95 percent would not complain to the company, but would express their discontent to 10 or 15 friends. Unless one of those friends was on the quality control team at that company, that probably isn't going to solve any problems for future buyers. We treat our jobs the same way, and unless we learn how to become real problem solvers, it will only hurt us in the long run.
  • Small Student Loan Debt, Big Problem?
    When it comes to personal finances, everything is relative. What seems expensive to one person is cheap to another, depending on their income stream, debt, and attitudes about money; this is true when we're talking about pocket money, but it's even truer when the subject is student loan debt. The tendency is to talk about debt as if borrowing less is always better. This makes sense at first glance – who would want to borrow more, if they could avoid it? But as Susan Dynarski points outs at The Upshot, borrowing less money isn't necessarily a recipe for career success – or even avoiding default.
  •  Jobs to Thrill Your Inner Child: Ice Cream Taster
    The job of an ice cream taster – also called a tastemaster, food scientist, sensory analyst, or flavorologist – is unsurprisingly, to taste-test ice cream. A full-time taster may be expected to stick to an aggressive daily sampling schedule, and is asked to assess the quality of each flavor on the basis of texture, color, smell, appearance, and other factors in addition to taste. While an exact job description depends on the employer and specific role, a taster's additional responsibilities can include inventing new ice cream flavors and products, or serving as a marketing rep for his or her company. As well as possibly being the most fun job in the universe, a career in frozen treat-sampling can be lucrative. An ice cream taster can earn up to $100,000 a year, according to some sources.
  • 5 Good Lessons to Learn From a Bad Job
    Some bad jobs are in the eye of the beholder – for whatever reason, the gig is the opposite of what you hoped you'd be doing at this particular place and time. Other bad jobs are more clearly defined: the pay is barely enough to live on, the duties don't use your skills, education or talents, or the people are just plain mean and unsupportive. Whatever the reason for your discontent, there's some good news hidden in even the worst work experience – bad jobs have a lot to teach you about building your best career, if you know how to look.
  • #College2Career: Kelly Eagen on Why College Major Isn't Career Destiny
    Choosing a major is invested with a mythic kind of importance, as if it were the first step on the path to inevitable career success or failure. But, if that were the case, every pre-law student student would go on to be a lawyer, and every English major would either write the Great American Novel or go on to live, penniless, in a garret. The actual truth is that while choice of major is important, it's not the end-all, be-all of career prep during college. PayScale's College Salary Report offers the information prospective students need to pick the right major, program, and school for their particular goals and needs; stories like this one offer perspective on how to use that information.
  • What Sets the Top Engineering Schools Apart? Not Just STEM.
    At first glance, the list of top colleges in PayScale's 2016 College Salary Report looks like a love letter to STEM degrees. Not only do science, technology, engineering, and math subjects dominate the list of highest-paid majors by any degree level, there is an undeniable correlation between how high a college or university ranks and the percentage of STEM degrees they grant. But, as anybody who passed a basic statistics class knows, correlation is not causation. A closer examination reveals that what separates the very best STEM-focused colleges from the rest is that they encourage students to branch out beyond a traditional STEM curriculum. By examining what drives the success of the highest-earning college graduates, we can all learn a valuable career lesson and increase our own earning potential.
  • Why I Chose to Study English
    If I had a dime for all the times someone questioned why I decided to study English, I'd probably have enough money to put me through law school. Jokes aside, I honestly can see where the confusion lies. My high school academic record reads like it belongs to a poster child pre-med student: 12 advanced placement courses including two years of calculus, an introductory statistics course, advanced biology, and physics. On top of all that, I attended one of the best STEM high schools in the nation, which, not incidentally, is also home to the best high school computer science program in the world.
  • How to Beat Pre-Interview Nerves
    Interviews can be scary. Go online, and you won't be hard pressed to find a plethora of blog posts, articles and studies on everything from wearing the right outfit to asking the proper questions. Well, add this to the canon. The subject: pre-interview nerves.
  • Baby Might Have Back, But Your Resume Shouldn't Have Any 'Buts'
    My father is a television fanatic — he always has been and likely always will be. Because of that, he often quotes various catchphrases that he finds humorous, attempting to take on the inflections of a specific actor's (or sometimes actress') voice. During the '90s, I was forced to endure countless repetitions of "Did I do that?" (thanks, Mr. Urkel), and before that, there were many, many John Wayne quotes.
  • Can't Remember Your Last Vacation? You're Not Alone.
    If you have trouble recalling that sand-in-your-toes feeling of a long vacation; you're not the only one. New data shows that a whopping 56 percent of Americans haven't taken a real vacation (one week away from the office) in the last 12 months. What's worse? That’s up from 52 percent in 2012. It's not that we don't need a week away from the grind, it's that we just aren't clocking out. But why?
  • Cool at 13, Not at 23: Why Popular Kids Aren't Necessarily Successful Adults
    Ever notice that the cool kids from high school seem to still be stuck there? They like to spend a lot of time talking about the good old days, and it's clear that these years were the highlight of their lives thus far. Well, there might be a good reason for that, and it's good news for workers who weren't exactly captain of the football team years ago.
  • Does College Major Matter?
    If you went by the amount of attention it receives during the college selection process, choice of major would be the most important decision you ever made in your life, right up there with whom you marry and whether to choose a city based on its most popular food product. (For the record, Philadelphians, you might be on to something with the cheesesteak.) The real question, of course, is does major matter more than other factors?
  • How to Avoid Having to Sell Your Diploma on eBay
    We live in a very strange world, in which going to college can feel like more of a gamble than hitting the blackjack table at Vegas. How can you really be sure that all your hard-earned – and more to the point, hard-borrowed – dollars are going to an investment that will pay off? More on that in a minute, but first: meet Stephanie Ritter, a college graduate whose underemployment situation got so dire, she decided to put her diploma up on eBay, at a price tag of $50,000, to defray the cost of her loans.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How Do I Get My Report to Take a Vacation?
    Ask most workers how they feel about vacation, and they'll tell you they don't get enough time off – unless they're one of those curious souls who seems to prefer toiling to time at the beach. Of course, things are not always what they seem: an apparent workaholic might be someone who fears losing her job, or whose workload seems too heavy to permit even a few days' reprieve. This week's roundup looks at what managers can do to help reports feel comfortable taking a much-needed vacation; plus, the things we're most likely to regret when we're older, and the important differences between a resume and LinkedIn profile.
  • 5 Things to Negotiate, Other Than Salary
    The words "compensation" and "salary" are often used interchangeably, as if they are synonyms, but that isn't the case at all. It's important to remember (particularly during negotiations) that salary is just one aspect, one part, of the compensation you'll receive from your employer.