• Depressed or Anxious? Blame the Gender Pay Gap
    Women are 70 percent more likely to suffer from depression than men, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and 83 percent of employed Americans consider this factor to be the number one barrier to workplace success, reports Diversity Woman. Discussions about why women are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety often focus on hormonal fluctuations or coping strategies. Now, new research suggests that part of the problem may actually be financial in nature.
  • Is Hillary Clinton Right That Americans Haven't Had a Raise in 15 Years?
    During last night's Democratic presidential debate in Milwaukee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said, "I know a lot of Americans are angry about the economy. And for good cause. Americans haven't had a raise in 15 years. There aren't enough good-paying jobs, especially for young people. And yes, the economy is rigged in favor of those at the top." Rigged economy aside, was she correct in saying that Americans haven't seen an increase in pay since the turn of the last century?
  • 3 Habits of Successful Interns (and Internship Programs)
    Internship programs can seem daunting, especially when they're new. It's a good idea to think about what you're getting into, whether you're a manager overseeing a new program or a prospective intern looking for an opportunity of a lifetime. A little preparation can make sure that everyone gets what they want out of the experience.
  • Show Your Coworkers How You Feel With PayScale Valentines
    Valentine's Day is a lot of pressure, whether you're in a relationship or not. Flowers, candy, expensive dinners ... it gets overwhelming, fast. So if you've wandered into the office today and realized that you don't have any tokens of the (strictly platonic unless sanctioned by HR) love you feel for your coworkers, PayScale is here to help with office-appropriate Valentine's Day e-cards. Enjoy!
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Beat the Resume Robots and Get Hired
    Before your resume ever reaches human eyes, it has to make it through the Applicant Tracking System, the software program that scans your CV and decides whether you make it to the people part of the hiring process. Understanding how these Applicant Tracking Systems work might mean the difference between getting that first interview and twiddling your thumbs while your resume languishes in the depths of a database. In this week's roundup, we get an inside look at these resume robots, plus learn about time management personality types and find out one reason why your last meeting was a bust.
  • Could a Little FOMO Be a Good Thing for Your Career?
    FOMO (or fear of missing out) is a very real feeling that your friends are having fun without you. When that fear creeps into our work lives from our personal lives, it takes the form of envy: somewhere out there, someone's career is advancing faster than your own. But could those (let's face it, kind of ugly) feelings of FOMO actually help inspire you?
  • The 4 Worst Cities to Find a Job
    The unemployment rate is down for the country at large, but the recovery has been pretty spotty and these rates vary widely state-to-state. It's important that folks looking for work understand the landscape of the current job market, so that they can make the best decisions for their futures. Recently, WalletHub released their report on 2016's Best and Worst Cities to Find a Job.
  • 3 Facts You Don't Know About #WomeninSTEM
    You know that STEM jobs are heavily male-dominated, and also – generally speaking – high-paying, high-growth occupations. The lack of representation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math jobs is one reason why the gender pay gap persists. You've probably also heard that tech companies are trying various things to create a more diverse workforce, in terms of hiring and promoting women and people of color, from Slack's plan to build tools that catch inequities early on to Salesforce's $3 million commitment to closing its internal gender pay gap. But there's a lot you don't know about the history and current state of women in tech, in particular. Today, on the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, let's take a look at some very nontrivial trivia.
  • The 4 Best Cities to Find a Job
    The unemployment rate has been steadily improving for a few years now. The latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, a figure we haven't seen since 2008. Although there are still some concerns about whether or not pay is also on the rise, the job market seems to be improving – but not everywhere. When it comes to finding a job, some cities offer more opportunity than others.
  • Is It Ever OK to Tell the Boss You're Looking for a New Job?
    The employee/boss relationship is a tricky thing to nail down. You might think that everything's friendly, but things could change on a dime once you announce that you've got one foot out the door. What should you do to keep that friendly vibe going (and ensure you get a good recommendation in the end)? Think about it, before you blab to your boss that you're outtie-5000.
  • Say This, Not That: 5 Ways to Stop Apologizing at Work
    As an introvert in the office, I constantly feel the need to say "sorry" every time someone has to go out of their way for me. This is not only a problem in the workplace, but a problem outside the workplace, too. Think about it, fellow introverts: do you remember the last time you were at a restaurant and you had to ask the waiter to fix your order because they gave you chicken pot pie instead of turkey pot pie? Let's be real – you probably felt bad about asking them to fix it, and you probably apologized to your waiter. The next time you're in a situation like this, especially at work, follow these tips to help yourself speak more articulately and positively.
  • Phasing Out Tipping Culture Could Reduce Workplace Harassment
    It's been dubbed the glass floor by some, and accepted as a reality of the American economy by many: tipping often makes up the bulk of pay for employees in the food service and hospitality industries. In fact, in many states, it's legal to pay tipped employees as little as $2.13 an hour, the federal tipped minimum wage. As a result, servers have to rely on customers' good graces to make up their paycheck – a situation that often leaves tipped workers vulnerable to sexual harassment.
  • How to Get Promoted When You Work From Home
    An increasing number of Americans telecommute, at least part of the time. In 2014, 23 percent of the employed population did some or all of their work from home on days that they worked, according to the American Time Use Survey. Technology has freed workers from the need to constantly toil away at the office, but that flexibility is not without its challenges. For one thing, it can be hard to get ahead when the boss never sees your face.
  • Is a Lack of Leisure Time Holding You Back in Your Career?
    More American women are working full-time, but that doesn't mean that their family lives have caught up. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in households with children under 6, moms put in an hour of physical childcare per day, while dads did 23 minutes. The chore breakdown was similarly unequal; on an average day, women spent 47 more minutes per day on household activities like food prep and laundry. Why is this a big deal? Well, in addition to making it harder for women to put in extra time at the office and get ahead at work, lack of leisure time means less room for creativity and innovation.
  • 62 People Have as Much Wealth as the Poorer Half of the World's Population
    Worldwide, the rich are definitely getting richer. How bad is it? A recent Oxfam report, An Economy for the 1%, highlights just how stark wealth inequality has grown across the globe. Let's take a look at some of the highlights from the report and learn why the growing gulf between rich and poor is bad for everyone.
  • Jack of All Trades Finds Permanent Solution for the Common Resume
    When it comes to making resumes, there are certain standard techniques for helping your CV rise to the top of the stack, like using the right format for the industry, keeping it to one page, and making sure you're presenting your most relevant experience first. But if you find the maintenance of resumes too tedious, and you like tattoos, this Redditor has one solution you really have to see for yourself.
  • 5 Reasons Why Your Employer Should Embrace Diversity
    Building a diverse company isn't just the right thing to do; according to research from Bersin by Deloitte, it's also pretty good for business. In a recent article for Forbes, contributor Josh Bersin wrote about why smart companies are making diversity and inclusion a top priority. Here's why your employer should be on board.
  • Are 'Gigs' Really That Great?
    Being a freelancer is anything but free. Sorry to be a downer, but it's true. If you don't plan for the unexpected, you might be shocked when you overdraw from your bank account or spend way more than 40 hours a week at this job you thought was going to be a breeze. Take stock of the realities of gig life before you make the jump.
  • Why Your Employer Probably Didn't Have a Super Bowl Ad
    Well over 100 million people watch the Super Bowl each year, and not all are football fans. Some of us are just there for the dip, the excuse to have a party, and yes, the commercials. But, at up to $5 million for a 30-second spot, air time during the big game isn't exactly cheap. As a result, we see a lot of commercials from mega-companies selling soda and beer and pharmaceuticals, and not much from small businesses. (Fun exception: Death Wish Coffee, the nine-person coffee company that won Intuit's Small Business Big Game contest.) What does this mean to you? Well, for one thing, you probably won't see your employer's logo pop up during the Super Bowl, unless your bosses get tickets, deck themselves out in corporate swag, and photobomb the TV cameras.
  • Here's What Millennials Want From Their Workplace
    Millennials, on more than one occasion, have been called the "me, me, me" generation. So when you're part of that generation, and you read a title like the one for this article, it may be tempting to think, "Here we go again: another post telling me how much I want a bean bag chair in my office." But the fact of the matter is that last year, millennials replaced Gen X as the largest share of the U.S. workforce. As a part of that emerging majority, you're entitled to seek out the kind of employer that's best for you. As a matter of clarity, here are some signs that your current or potential employer has the pulse of millennials, and where there may be a red flag.

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