• 5 Tricks to Calm Down Before a Big Job Interview
    It's a cruel fact of the job search process: just when you need to have your wits about you, the pressure of acing the job interview makes it hard to project calm professionalism. If only you could be as relaxed before the interview as you inevitably will be after -- when all you have to do is think about how much better you'd be, if you could just do everything over again.
  • 4 Ways to Take Control of Your Workday
    The typical American worker is stretched too thin. We have more to do in a day than anyone could possibly accomplish. We feel besieged by an ever-evolving list of action items that drain our intellectual and emotional resources, and our time. Here's how to reclaim control of time at work, as well as work smarter and maybe not so darn hard.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Everything Is a Crisis, Flat Wages, and Sinister Office Remodeling
    The past couple of years have been rough on everyone. If you managed to make it through the post-recession landscape without getting laid off yourself, chances are, you know someone who wasn't so lucky. Small wonder, then, that many workers are a bit anxious. This week's roundup looks at how to handle work anxiety and how to tell if layoff fears are justified. Plus: an explanation of why the economy is improving, but your paycheck isn't.
  • 5 Easy Ways to Be Happier at Work
    In a perfect world, we'd be able to walk away from less-than-awesome jobs, preferably after making a well-scripted scene that somehow has no lasting repercussions for our professional futures. In real life, however, being able to ditch an unwanted job at a moment's notice is as rare as a meet-cute on public transit with the love of your life. It's the stuff of romantic comedies, in other words. If you want to improve your life immediately, your best bet isn't ditching your job; it's learning how to make your life better while you sneakily make long-term plans to secure new employment.
  • These 5 Jobs Have the Worst Gender Wage Gap
    Women make about 80 percent of what men earn, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is a big improvement over 30 years ago, when the number was 65.7 percent, but far from pay equity. PayScale's research on the gender wage gap shows that some of the continued disparity between male and female pay is due to occupational "choice," i.e. women opting for lower-paying jobs that give back and allow more flexibility. But lower pay for women can't entirely be explained by job type. In fact, some of the highest-paying industries also feature the largest pay gaps.
  • 4 Great Reasons to Doodle at Work
    Doodling, an act as old as note-taking itself, is better understood than it once was. It turns out, there may be some real benefits to this activity that could make you more creative, productive, and focused. Here's why the practice is gaining acceptance and popularity in more and more workplaces.
  • A New/Old Strategy for Career Success: Handwritten Letters
    When's the last time you wrote a letter by hand? If you're like many of us, it was probably the last time you had to write an actual thank-you note -- your wedding, perhaps, or a childhood birthday. If you are already short on time, the idea of adding such a labor-intensive project to your to-do list can seem overwhelming. But taking 10 minutes a week to send at least one handwritten letter can provide a networking boost that email can't offer.
  • 3 Things You Can Negotiate Besides Money
    Deserve more money? The first step is negotiating a higher salary, either after receiving a new job offer or during the annual review. However, sometimes employers can't pay more. This does not mean that they can't afford to help by offering a better benefits package. Benefits packages are more than healthcare and a retirement plan; be creative and ask for what you want.
  • 3 Ways to Be Productive When You Only Have 5 Minutes
    If only we could combine all those five-minute segments of time while we're on hold or idling in a meeting room, waiting for the other participants to appear, we could knock another item off our to-do lists almost every day. (Or, at least, take lunch away from our desks now and then.) Failing major changes to the way time and space work, the best we can do is take advantage of those minutes where we find them.
  • Just How Common Is Age Discrimination?
    Race- and sex-based discrimination are such hot topics in the media that one can easily forget that other types of employment discrimination are all too commonplace. While the number of age discrimination cases in the United States is dropping a little bit as the economy improves, the numbers are still shockingly high.
  • 5 Career Lessons From Leslie Knope
    The last episode of Parks and Recreation airs tonight, and while the show was never a runaway ratings hit, it holds a special place in many people's hearts. In no small part, this is because of its heroine, Leslie Knope, whose relentless energy and enthusiasm for even the drudge work involved in government service was an inspiration for every lady who's ever decorated her cubicle with pictures of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Hillary Clinton. Plus, she loves waffles: "We need to remember what's important in life: friends, waffles, work. Or waffles, friends, work. Doesn't matter, but work is third." Priorities!
  • How the Great Recession Changed Millennials' Lives Forever
    It's not easy to "make it" in this country on your own. Every generation has struggled to find their professional path, to gain intellectual, personal, and financial independence, and establish a life for themselves. But, there is no doubt that the latest generation to enter the workforce, the Millennials, has had an especially difficult time getting started.
  • Office Etiquette: No, the Boss Should Not Take Staff to See '50 Shades of Grey'
    The best thing about working with people is that you'll never be bored. The worst thing is that sometimes, boredom seems preferable to what you have to deal with from your fellow humans. For example, everyone's had that boss who was apparently out sick on Appropriate Behavior Day during management training.
  • Social Media Data Is Being Used to Calculate Student Loan Risk in the UK
    Calculating risk is a complex process, particularly in the competitive student loans market. Basing decisions on potential earnings rather than current assets and income, as banks traditionally do, makes more sense when it comes to loaning to young people. Now, some companies are turning to social media, and checking out clients' connections, in order to assess the risk of the potential borrower, and also to put pressure on those who default.
  • Oscar-Winner Patricia Arquette Calls for an End to the Gender Wage Gap
    Oscar speeches are, for the most part, pretty boring. There's only so much a star can say during the 50 or 60 seconds they're allowed, before the "shut up" music swells. This year, however, Best Supporting Actress winner Patricia Arquette chose to make the most of her minute, and used her speech as a platform to call for wage equality for women.
  • Who Is Late to Work and Why?
    In a recent self-reported survey, 19 percent of Americans admitted to being late for work at least once per week, if not more often -- that is almost one in five working people. Forty-eight percent, or just under half, claimed to never be late for work. The question is, who are the chronically late folks, and why do they have so much trouble getting into the office?
  • 5 Creative Ways to Revive Your Struggling Career
    What have you done for your career lately? Chances are, not enough. Much like a relationship, your career also needs proper care and attention in order for it to flourish. If you're guilty of being neglectful, here are five creative ways to help you rekindle the fire and fall back in love with your career.
  • Job Training Funds Go to Workers Who Need It Least
    A recent Georgetown University report on employee training trends and spending claims that the least experienced American workers are often the ones who ironically receive the least postsecondary job training from employers and educational institutions. "Employer training trends to be for the most experienced and most educated employees," summarizes lead author Anthony Carnevale of the study's revelations.
  • 'Women Make Better Leaders,' Says Research (and Mr. Wonderful of Shark Tank)
    "Women make better CEOs." These fine words come from none other than Kevin O'Leary, better known as Mr. Wonderful on ABC's The Shark Tank. O'Leary holds an impressive business portfolio, and 55 percent of the CEOs in it are women. Why, then, are women so exceedingly underrepresented in high-level, leadership positions still to this day? One ongoing study examined just that.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Quit Your Job, Become a Social Introvert, and Change Your Attitude
    One of the toughest things about life, both personally and professionally, is that there's only so much you can control. You can't change your nature, for example, and become wildly extroverted if you're someone who draws her energy from within, and you can't necessarily make a bad job into a good one. You can, however, learn to make things better by cultivating certain skills and improving your attitude. And sometimes, you can quit your job and go on to another one -- if you go about things the right way.