• How to Get These 5 High-Paying, Low-Stress Jobs
    Want a good- or even great-paying job but don't want to join the ranks of the over-stressed? Believe it or not, there are options for you. Recently, Business Insider put together a list of high-paying jobs with lower "stress tolerance" ratings, using data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and U.S. Occupational Information Network. We looked at what it takes to prepare for some of top jobs on their list.
  • How To Tell If People Management IS For You
    Just because you are doing exceptionally in your current job doesn't mean you are ready to take on a managerial position. It also does not mean that your career path is only in the individual contributor career track. You won't really know if you are a good people manager, unless you really start managing a team, but if you have the following traits, that's a great start.
  • What Teachers Say About College and Career Readiness
    EdSource, in partnership with the California Teachers Association (CTA), conducted an online survey to find out what teachers feel is the key to career and college readiness and success. The results spoke volumes about what we ought to be providing our next generation of workers, according to the people on the front lines, and about what these students are learning instead. Let's take a closer look.
  • Workplace Lulz: When Blissful Ignorance Turns Your Career Into an Awkard Penguin
    You're serious about your career, but that doesn't mean that you can't get a side order of lulz along with your career advice. With the help of socially awkward penguin and Scumbag Steve, we tackle the issues of generations in the workplace, introverts who are forced to socialize at work, and dress codes in this week's Workplace Lulz.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Beyonce Can Teach You About Job Interviews
    If you've ever experienced stage fright before a job interview, you'll see the parallels between performing and interviewing for a new job. Unless you're someone who loves being the center of attention, however, you might not think of that as a positive thing. In this week's roundup, we look at why one expert takes job interview inspiration from Beyonce; plus, some insight into the "9-to-5" workday in 2015, and a love song to the to-do list.
  • How to Answer Horrible Interview Questions
    Congratulations: you got an interview! Good on you for taking the time to prepare. Does the thought of 45 minutes of unfettered questioning send you into a cold sweat? Are you a shoe-in on paper and a mush-mouth in person? It's OK: most people are. In fact, 92 percent of Americans are stressed about at least one aspect of their upcoming job interviews. Tied for second place was the fear of not being able to answer a specific question.
  • Hot Desking Seems Like a Terrible Idea. Is It?
    Hot desking isn't a new idea, but it may be one picking up steam, especially as big corporations with big footprints try to squeeze the dime out of every dollar of floor space. Imagine this: you show up to work and plop your laptop just anywhere there's room. From day to day, your spot might be all over the floor or building, depending on available space and maybe even your mood. Is having an unassigned desk really a good thing for those who need to work?
  • LinkedIn Sent Your Friends Too Many Emails, and All You Got Was $1,500 (Maybe)
    Whether it's the canned kind or the sort that involves male enhancement products, spam is generally worthless – unless the spam in question came from LinkedIn, and arrived in your potential connections' inboxes repeatedly, with your name and without your consent. In that case, it might be worth a share of a recent $13 million settlement.
  • How to Make People Want to Do What You Tell Them to Do
    Does your job feel like it should include "herding cats" in the description most of the time? How do you get people you manage to actually want to do what you tell them? Unless you're a pre-school teacher, you're likely dealing with a gaggle of adults, but sometimes it's next to impossible to get them to operate like a team, all working for the same common goal. So here are some ideas that are so simple, they just might work (and no, they don't involve pointy sticks).
  • 10 Creative Out-of-Office Replies You Can Use Right Now
    We're a full step into fall, which means if you're not drowning in leaf piles, you're probably drowning in work. You know what you deserve? That's right, a mental health day. The problem for most of us, however, isn't being able to take the time off. It's being able to unplug for more than 12 hours. According to one study, nearly 50 percent of respondents admitted to checking email while on vacation. It's time to put your OOO on, and put your phone away.
  • Is a 6-Hour Workday Right for You?
    The 40-hour work week is relic of the past, and some employers in Sweden are looking to the future. Companies as diverse as automobile manufacturers and nursing homes have transitioned to a shorter work day, some of them as far back as a decade ago. Those that have made the change report increased productivity, as well as better work-life balance for their employees.
  • How to Recover From Embarrassment at Work
    Even if you're a pretty mellow person, you probably still have that cache of "ugh" moments stored in the back of your brain. Since most of us spend the bulk of our waking moments at work, it's not a surprise if a lot of them feature TPS reports and accidental CCs. No matter what it feels like, however, embarrassment isn't forever – or at least, it doesn't have to be.
  • Peeple Might Be a Hoax, But You Can Learn From It Anyway
    Imagine a world in which every former boss, bad first date, or disgruntled colleague could complain about you online – and it would have the weight of a LinkedIn recommendation or a Yelp review. That's the dystopian future seemingly promised by Peeple, the as-yet-unlaunched app that would allow users to rate people as if they were restaurants or movie theaters. As you can imagine, the internet burst into flames, hounding the founders on social media until they took down their feeds, accounts, and even the company site itself. There's just one problem: some savvy watchers of internet brouhahas are now asking if the the whole thing is a hoax.
  • You're Probably Not Getting a Big Raise Next Year
    There are a handful of times in life that a single percentage can make a big difference: that calculus final you forgot to study for, the Olympic trial event you're watching on TV, and the rate of your salary increase. In this case, we're talking about salaries, and the difference between the difference between 4.1 percent and 2.8 percent — and why you may need to get used to the latter.
  • 4 Reasons Humility Is a Virtue Worth Embracing
    It's often said that, in business, confidence is king. In fact, it is good to project confidence at work – or rather, timidity and lack of confidence can really hold you back. But, ego and hubris can do damage, too. Perhaps it's time to take a good hard look at the value of humility and try to understand how cultivating and expressing it could help you professionally. Here are a few reasons humility is a virtue worth embracing.
  • From /r/CareerGuidance: How Do I Apply for an Entry-Level Job ... Before Graduation?
    Picture this: You're in your junior year of pursuing a computer science degree. And one day, while your working your crappy college retail job, it hits you. It's time to get super cereal about your career. But where do you start? How do you apply for an entry-level position? Allow us to explain.
  • 5 Salary Negotiation Lessons From Amy Schumer
    Unless you're a huge standup comedy nerd – the kind who can justifiably brag that you've seen everyone "before they were cool" – you probably hadn't heard of Amy Schumer as recently as five years ago. Today, Schumer's everywhere, winning an Emmy for her sketch show Inside Amy Schumer and writing and starring in Trainwreck, which was directed by Judd Apatow. Oh, and also: she just negotiated an $8 to $10 million book deal, after canceling an earlier deal for $1 million – as Vulture put it, like a boss.
  • 3 Ways to Prevent Bad News From Ruining Your Productivity
    It seems everywhere you turn, something terrible is happening in the world and you can't help but let it affect you. What was once curiosity has now turned into full-fledged ruminating and you start feeling powerless and sad about the tragedies occurring around the world. Not only is your mood shot, but the bad news is making your performance at work go downhill, too. Don't worry, because there is hope. We'll discuss three techniques to help you deal with bad news more constructively so that it doesn't ruin your mood or, worse, your career.
  • Big Meeting? Here's How to Pick the Right Time for It
    Imagine this: you're in charge of planning exactly when to present the Big Proposal to the boss, and you have to pick the location, day, and time for the meeting. You've got a slot on Tuesday at 10 a.m., 3 p.m., or 4 p.m. Which do you choose so that the boss is the most receptive to your ideas?
  • How to Keep Your Helicopter Parents From Ruining Your Career
    Helicopter parents are usually the province of parenting blogs and editorials, not so much career blogs like ours. But, the micromanaging doesn't necessarily stop when kids are small – or even when they graduate from college and go out into the world to get a job. If your parents are the helicopter variety, you're probably kind of embarrassed and confused about how to get them to lay off and let you make your own decisions. Worse, you might find yourself without the kind of real-life skills it takes to build your career, manage your finances, and just plain survive. If this is you, don't despair. You can escape the meddling and become independent. Here's how.