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  • Interactive Map Shows the Location of Most Jobs in the US
    Robert Manduca, a PhD student studying sociology and social policy at Harvard, has created an interactive map that plots 96 percent of the jobs in America according to category and location.
  • The Cardinals' New Hire Can Teach Managers All Something About Good Candidates
    "Fifteen years of experience playing football, first woman to play with men, and doctorate in psychology — I hope I can figure out something to contribute in there." That's what Dr. Jen Welter had to say when a reporter asked the new Arizona Cardinals assistant coaching intern, "What can you offer?" It's the kind of question managers should be asking every candidate up for a new job — but her answer, power-packed as it is, really only scratches the surface.
  • 10 Things to Do When You Get the Silent Treatment After a Job Interview
    Job interviews can be a lot like blind dates. You walk out of an awesome date thinking that this person is THE one. You've never felt more confident about anything in your life. Then, a couple of days turns into a week without you hearing back from that person, and you find yourself in a dumbfounded, anxiety-ridden tailspin, because you swore it was meant to be. The only thing you can do now is regain composure and figure out how to make sense of all this. Here are a few things to consider so that you can move on from this situation with more confidence and clarity, regardless of the outcome.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Kill the Vocal Fry, Get the Job You Deserve?
    There's plenty of debate about whether or not vocal fry, that Kardashian-esque speaking affectation, is bad for you, professionally. Some experts claim that talking like a reality TV star will permanently cripple your career, while others note that even high-level financial executives now embrace the professional equivalent of baby talk. Regardless, having more awareness of and control over your public image is always a good thing. This week's roundup covers how to manage vocal fry, plus networking without feeling phony, and staying productive during the lazy days of summer.
  • Can You Guess How Many Female CEOs There Are in the World?
    If you can't name the right number, don't worry: neither can executives. The 1,700 participants of a Weber Shandwick study guessed that 23 percent of CEOs at large companies were women. Take a look at the embarrassing results of the study and the shocking truth of how few female CEOs actually exist today.
  • Key & Peele Asks, 'What If We Worshipped Teachers Like We Do Pro Athletes?'
    Imagine a world in which teachers are hired via a draft broadcast live from Radio City Music Hall, do commercials for major brands, and scoop up contracts worth tens of millions of dollars. Or, you know, just watch Key & Peele's latest sketch, TeachingCenter, which does it for you.
  • 8 Things I Wish My High School Counselor Told Me About Applying to College
    Being a high school senior is tough. With the competitive nature of college admissions these days, balancing academics, extracurricular activities, family commitments, and applications is truly a feat. While high school counselors are at their disposal during the crucial months of October through December, seniors are tirelessly scouring college confidential forums, messaging alumni, and hacking into college admissions databases simply because they aren't getting the information they want and need. So here's the million-dollar question: What questions do 12th graders have that aren't being answered by the school counseling department?
  • How to Stay Healthy During a Conference
    Whether you're still recovering from Comic-Con a few weeks ago, or you're gearing up to take a few of your colleagues out to NYC for LeadsCon at the end of August, you're probably well aware of how exhausting conventions and conferences can be. Swarms of people, reams of business cards, and a whole lot of handshakes — sounds like you need a battle plan.
  • What's Your Employer's Philosophy: Work to Live or Live to Work?
    In 2006, Treehouse CEO Ryan Carson decided to give employees of the Portland, Oregon-based technology education company three-day weekends every week, arguing that living to work instead of working to live is not the best (or at least only) key to a company's profitability and overall success. But, that doesn't mean that his decision was motivated solely by a desire to be a more humane boss. Employers making similar decisions are just as interested in the bottom line as they are in making workers' lives better. It turns out, working less sometimes means producing more – and better – work.
  • 5 Ways to Boost Productivity on Your 15-Minute Break
    Is your brain saying "Friday," while the calendar insists it's Wednesday? The monotony of the day-in and day-out of your job can cause your productivity to come to a screeching halt long before the workweek is over. These 15-minute productivity boosters will help you get back on track, so that you can clock-out with confidence.
  • Stop Wishing Your Job Was More Creative and Make It So
    Did you ever wish you had a job that allowed you to exercise more creativity? You're not alone. Today's workers crave opportunities to exercise creativity, and they want to work for a company that allows them to take creative risks. But, it's not all up to your employer. Here are some tips for being more creative at work, no matter what you do for a living.
  • Need to Vent? BetterCompany Lets You Talk Anonymously About Work
    One of the trickiest and most annoying things you'll have to deal with in your career is office drama. One app aims to combat office politics by creating a "safe place" for co-workers to discuss work matters openly and honestly with one another, all while remaining anonymous. Read on to learn more (and where you can sign up).
  • These Are the 5 Least Meaningful Jobs (According to the People Who Do Them)
    Even if your job is just for the paycheck, and you get most of your joy and satisfaction after work hours are over, you probably don't want to work at a totally meaningless gig. After all, if you're going to spend at least a third of your life – and most of your waking hours during your workweek – at your job, it'd be nice if you got something out of it besides the means to pay the rent. If meaningful work is important to you, you'll want to take a look at PayScale's latest report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs – special emphasis on these jobs, which workers say are least likely to make the world a better place.
  • 10 Female STEM Stars Under 30
    Women make up only 24 percent of the STEM workforce in the US, according to the Department of Commerce, and some fields are worse than others. Women represent only 14 percent of the country's engineers, but make up 47 percent of mathematicians and statisticians, 47 percent of life scientists, and 63 percent of social scientists. But as these rising stars of the tech industry show, women are making an impact on STEM. Given the impressive laundry list of accomplishments already made by all of the women on our list at such a young age, it's safe to say that both they and their careers are something to watch.
  • Programs That Promise Jobs for Grads Remind Us That a Degree Isn't a Guarantee
    Much of the next election will be centered around which candidate can provide the best path for new jobs and a growing economy. Some candidates have promised 4 percent growth every year. Others say the answer lies in massive government spending on infrastructure repair. Now, a group of U.S. companies has decided not to wait for the next president: they call themselves the 100K Opportunities Initiative.
  • Does the Boss's Gender Change How Men Negotiate Salary?
    Salary negotiation is important. The salary you command at the start of a new job impacts your pay for the remainder of your time with the company, and possibly beyond. Over time, not negotiating can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost pay. Furthermore, people who ask for raises earn more than those who don't. We know that women are less likely to negotiate than men, but gender can also impact negotiation from the other side of the table. Recent research suggests that men negotiate differently when their boss is a woman.
  • No, Millennial Women Aren't Taking a 'Career Pause'
    We've all heard the myth of the "career pause" – it's used as an excuse when bosses decide not to hire young women. To explain it in the simplest terms, it's the idea that a woman will plan to take time off from her career to raise a family, in some modern iteration of the cult of domesticity. After all, bosses (and journalists) claim, young women will just get pregnant, and go on leave. Then, they'll stay home, need a flex-schedule, choose a lesser job, or in other ways divert from what could be considered a standard career path.
  • Don't Dismiss Small Talk; Use It for Big Talk
    Small talk exists in nearly every language. In Japan, it comes in the form of short grunts and nods called "aizuchi." In Persian culture, they're "taarof." In his 1923 essay, The Problem of Meaning in Primitive Language, Polish anthropologist Bronisław Malinowski coined the term "phatic communion" to describe small talk as "language used more for the purpose of establishing an atmosphere or maintaining social contact than for exchanging information or ideas." Whatever you call it, small talk plays a role in most cultures. And for most people, it either comes naturally or it doesn't. In fact, many of us hate it, particularly in a career context.
  • More Summer Jobs for Teens, But Do They Want Them?
    The impact of the Great Recession was far-reaching. Although the economy has started to improve in recent years, things aren't the way they used to be. This is true for teens as well as adults. The teen labor force is a complicated matter, with a lot of different factors contributing to the current summer employment reality. Let's take a closer look at a few facts pertaining to summer jobs for teens in 2015.
  • 5 Reasons Millennial Women Are Saying 'I Do' to Their Careers Instead of Marriage
    Did you know that 25 percent of today's young adults will likely never have been married by the time they reach their mid-40s to mid-50s? We'll take a look at why so many millennials prefer to marry their careers rather than their significant others.