• Want a STEM Job? Write Your Resume Like a Man
    Women continue to chip away at the glass ceiling, slowly but surely, but gender bias can hold them back in lucrative fields like STEM. Some analyses of men's and women's resumes offer clues for women to help themselves break into that science-based dream job. Consider writing your resume "like a man."
  • Who Are the Shrinking Middle Class?
    The PEW Charitable Trusts defines middle class households as "those making between 67 percent and 200 percent of the state's median income." There is a lot riding on that definition, however. If the state's median income is low and the cost of living is high, many families who fit the definition of "middle class" may not have access to things we often associate with being middle class, including education, owning a home, or even just a savings account. The bad news is that, by various measurements, the middle class in every state is shrinking.
  • Good News for College Grads: More Real Jobs
    Wondering about whether to go back to school to finish (or start) your bachelor's degree? You might not have to worry quite as much about whether you'll have a job after graduation, at least compared to grads from the past few years. The latest research shows that full-time, permanent jobs for college graduates are on the rise.
  • 3 Ways to Stay Productive and Happy While Working From Home
    The opportunity to work from home can be a dream come true: no time spent commuting, no sitting in traffic, and the flexibility to work wherever and maybe even whenever you want. However, some people find it difficult to maintain a high level of productivity while working at home, and others find that the isolation causes depression, which is bad for both their personal and professional life. The following tips are proven to help people who work from home maintain their sanity, their happiness, and their productivity.
  • Does Teamwork Make Us More Effective as Individuals?
    Prefer to work alone? The modern workplace is probably pretty hard on you. Most companies emphasize teamwork these days, as requiring employees to work together is believed to encourage collaboration and increase efficiency and creativity. The good news is that you don't have to a natural team player to see some benefits from (occasional) teamwork.
  • Why Emotional Intelligence Matters in the Workplace
    What makes a person successful? A variety of factors help, including a good academic record, solid work experience, and networking connections who are willing to help open doors. But when it comes to really making your mark in your chosen field, you'll need more than that. Emotional intelligence can make all the difference.
  • NYU Student Starts Petition to Combat Rising Tuition
    Nia Mirza is a future college student who should be happy, proud, and excited to be accepted into New York University's (NYU) freshman class in the fall. Instead, she is reeling from the most recent tuition hike that will cost Mirza and her family $71,000 for just her first year. In exasperation, she started a petition on to pressure NYU to roll back the increase.
  • Rich Kids Graduate From College, Poor Kids Don't
    Getting a college education increases a person's income earning potential. In 2013, Americans whose households made over $108,650 in 2012 were more than eight times more likely to have graduated from a bachelor’s-degree program than Americans whose households made less than $34,160. Go back to 1970, and the higher-income group was five times more likely to have earned a bachelor's degree. The trend indicates that a college education has become more and more important to financial health and success. The problem is that the high cost of education makes finishing a bachelor's degree much harder for the nation's poorest students.
  • How to Handle Your Intra-Office Crush
    That new person in the office is cute, has a great sense of humor and is just all-around somebody you'd like to get to know better. And that may be the key about crushes -- we can develop crushes on people we don't know very well, and true romantic relationships require a deep understanding of each other. Intra-office crushes are normal but can have negative impacts upon productivity and office life. Here's how to handle the situation.
  • Why You Should Socialize With Your Colleagues
    Sometimes, workplace social events feel like a chore. Management may not want to "waste" time sponsoring fun during the workday, and not all employees are thrilled about spending their free time on the weekend at the company picnic. However, that social time among staff can boost productivity and increase morale and quality of life at work. Here is why you should encourage social events at your workplace.
  • Relax! Alleviate Your Anxiety Before a Job Interview
    You polished your resume and got a job interview. You researched the company. You practiced answering questions about your experiences in front of a mirror. You really want this job, and you do possess the qualifications necessary to do it. But you still can't shake that feeling of nervousness or get rid of the butterflies in your stomach. You are not alone; many of us feel anxiety before interviews, especially in today's competitive job market. Here are ways you can alleviate your anxiety and have a good interview.
  • Why Psychologists Like the Term 'Mansplaining,' and You Should, Too
    If you've spent any time at all in the blogosphere lately, you've probably heard the term "mansplaining." Even if portmanteaus make you cringe, this one is worth dealing with. Psychologists and sociologists believe that by embracing incendiary language we can, over time, successfully combat pervasive, sexist attitudes in the workplace and everywhere else.
  • Too Much Work Is Making Us Sick
    A recent report found that increasing workloads for employees puts their health at risk in a variety of ways. While the report examined workers in Germany, the results are relevant to workers in both Europe and North America, because we are seeing the same trends in so many of the world's developed countries. Too much work is making us all sick.
  • How the Hazards of 'Clopening' Affect You
    "Clopening" is the newest trend in the service industry. In order to shave costs by relying on fewer employees, many employers are scheduling the same person to close up a restaurant at midnight, only to return in seven hours to open. Clopening exists in more industries than just hospitality: retail, security, construction, and nursing are using the practice, as well. The harsh consequences of clopening affect more than just the weary service worker; they affect us all in detrimental ways.
  • Warning to Job Seekers: The Commuter You Just Flipped Off Might Be the Hiring Manager
    It's every job seeker's worst nightmare. A man is running late on the way to a job interview, nervous, and he bumps into some guy boarding a crowded commuter train. He blows up, uses an incredibly rude expletive, and spends the rest of the time on the commute trying to calm down. Upon arriving at the interview, he and the hiring manager recognize each other -- the hiring manager is the guy he insulted earlier this morning.
  • Teeny-Tiny Is the New Trend in Office Space
    It seems that if you want some room to stretch while you work, you may be better off in a prison cell than a modern workspace. Mother Jones reports that, soon enough, supermax prisoners will have more leg room that office workers.
  • 5 Things Recruiters Won't Tell You (But Should)
    It's a tough job market out there, and trying to get noticed and remembered may seem a daunting task. Recruiters and job interviewers seldom give feedback to those who don't make the grade. Here's what you need to know.
  • 3 Things You Can Negotiate Besides Money
    Deserve more money? The first step is negotiating a higher salary, either after receiving a new job offer or during the annual review. However, sometimes employers can't pay more. This does not mean that they can't afford to help by offering a better benefits package. Benefits packages are more than healthcare and a retirement plan; be creative and ask for what you want.
  • Who Is Late to Work and Why?
    In a recent self-reported survey, 19 percent of Americans admitted to being late for work at least once per week, if not more often -- that is almost one in five working people. Forty-eight percent, or just under half, claimed to never be late for work. The question is, who are the chronically late folks, and why do they have so much trouble getting into the office?
  • Why Women Don't Negotiate Salary, and What to Do About It
    We've all heard about the gender wage gap, and experts love to wax eloquent on the reasons why women make less money. Some say that women tend to choose occupations that pay less, others blame women for taking time out to raise children. There is plenty of evidence pointing to another reason, however: research shows that women make less money than men for performing the same work because of societal expectations of behavior for men and women. Women likely fall victim to these expectations even if we don't realize it; we can counter these deep-seated cultural norms to our own benefit.

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)

Comp Managers: Start Here »