• Why Your Employer Probably Didn't Have a Super Bowl Ad
    Well over 100 million people watch the Super Bowl each year, and not all are football fans. Some of us are just there for the dip, the excuse to have a party, and yes, the commercials. But, at up to $5 million for a 30-second spot, air time during the big game isn't exactly cheap. As a result, we see a lot of commercials from mega-companies selling soda and beer and pharmaceuticals, and not much from small businesses. (Fun exception: Death Wish Coffee, the nine-person coffee company that won Intuit's Small Business Big Game contest.) What does this mean to you? Well, for one thing, you probably won't see your employer's logo pop up during the Super Bowl, unless your bosses get tickets, deck themselves out in corporate swag, and photobomb the TV cameras.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: To Be a Strong Leader, Embrace Vulnerability
    When is strength actually a weakness? When it's a facade of toughness, rather than the real deal. This special kind of workplace machismo can keep leaders from asking questions, and when it does, real problems result, both for companies and for the individual who's trying so hard to project strength. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to embrace vulnerability, plus how to get along better with co-workers, and the big mistakes you're probably making on social media, right now.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 151,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Dips to 4.9 Percent
    The monthly Employment Situation Summary, released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed the addition of 151,000 jobs to public and private, non-farm payrolls, and an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, the lowest in eight years. Prior to the release, economists were predicting the addition of 190,000 jobs. In a mixed report, however, the real good news is wage growth.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 205,000 Jobs in January
    The ADP National Employment Report beat expectations again this month, reflecting the addition of 205,000 jobs to private payrolls from December to January, according to the payroll processor. Prior to the release of the report, economists polled by Reuters were predicting average gains of 195,000 jobs.
  • How to Escape Your Own Personal Career Groundhog Day
    Punxsutawney Phil says it's going to be an early spring, and if you heard that in Bill Murray's voice, you are old. Just kidding, youthful Bill Murray superfans – you don't need to have seen Groundhog Day in the theater to appreciate its message. In fact, the movie is such a classic, it was deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant by the United States National Film Registry in 2006, and selected for preservation. What about the film strikes a chord, even 23 years after its release? Well, if you've ever had a terrible job, you probably relate to Murray's character, Phil Connors, a self-absorbed weatherman who's stuck repeating the same day over and over again.
  • #MondayMotivation: 5 Quick and Easy Changes to Boost Productivity This Week
    Last week, you said you'd do everything differently, starting today – start exercising before work, cross those lingering to-dos off your list for good, begin learning that new skill that will take your career to the next level. Now it's Monday, and you're thoroughly unprepared to do any of those things. What happened? Well, for starters, you might be thinking too big, especially for a Monday.
  • Obama Plans to Fight the Gender Pay Gap With Data
    Exactly seven years ago today, President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, amending the Civil Rights Act to alter the statute of limitations for discrimination claims. It was the first bill he signed into law as president, and an important tool for women fighting to close the gender pay gap. Today, Obama extends those protections by announcing a new rule to require companies with 100 or more employees to furnish the government with pay data on gender, race, and ethnicity.
  • Is Obamacare 'the Biggest Job-Killer in This Country'?
    During last night's seventh Republican debate, Sen. Ted Cruz said: "... we have seen now in six years of Obamacare that it has been a disaster. It is the biggest job-killer in this country. Millions of Americans have lost their jobs, have been forced into part-time work, have lost their health insurance, have lost their doctors, have seen their premiums skyrocket." If elected, he said, he would "repeal every word of Obamacare" – which would be a worthy goal, if Obamacare were really the job-killer Cruz claims it is. But is it?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is Your Phone Hurting Your Career?
    Picture your last meeting: it probably involved a lot of people staring at their mobile devices, and not many people engaging with the speaker. Worse, our device addiction has spread outside the confines of the conference room. People now look at their phones while they're supposedly having conversations with clients and colleagues. All of this is rude, of course, but more importantly, it's an attention-killer. After a few years of checking your phone every couple of minutes, it's hard to even remember how to entertain yourself or focus on anything. In today's roundup, we look at a few rules to keep your smartphone and other devices from taking over your life; plus, why someone else got promoted instead of you, and 20 affirmations that will appeal even to people who hate affirmations.
  • The Top 10 Employers for Work-From-Home Jobs
    Last year was a big year for would-be telecommuters, according to job search site FlexJobs: from 2014 to 2015, the site found a 36 percent increase in job listings that offered some telecommuting option, either part- or full-time. If you're hoping to make the transition to working from home this year, the company's latest list will be of great interest: 100 Top Companies With Remote Jobs in 2016 ranks the employers that offered the most work-from-home jobs in 2015.
  • What You Need to Know About Obama's Wage Insurance Proposal
    In his State of the Union address earlier this month, President Obama called for "a system of wage insurance" to make sure that Americans who lose their jobs and take new ones for lower wages can still pay their bills. Here's how this plan, should it come to fruition, might affect you.
  • The 10 Best Jobs for 2016 Are Mostly in Healthcare
    What makes a job good? According to U.S. News and World Report, which just put out its list of The 100 Best Jobs for 2016, it's a mixture of factors like salary, occupational outlook, and work-life balance. There's also, as the editors point in out in the methodology, the all-important personal preference. That last factor is important, if impossible to weight: there's no point in contemplating a career change to a job you'll hate, no matter how many openings there are or what kind of salary you can expect to pull down once you make the transition. That said, one thing immediately becomes clear perusing U.S. News's list: if you want one of the top-ranked jobs, it will help if you're interested in entering a healthcare profession.
  • Democratic Town Hall in Iowa: The Candidates' Answers to Questions on Jobs
    As we get closer to the election, the primary races start to feel more like a boxing match. The Democrats are less likely to throw blows at one another than the candidates in the wider Republican field, but they do fall into the kind of media caricatures that feel more appropriate for professional athletes. You can even imagine what would be painted on their boxing robes: Bernie Sanders, the Heart; Hillary Clinton, the Head; Martin O'Malley, the Dark Horse. Last night's CNN Iowa Democratic Presidential Town Hall allowed the candidates to speak slightly more in depth, and try to get beyond the sound bites by answering voters' questions directly.
  • Too Scared to Negotiate Salary? Try These 3 Things
    Along with strategic advice on getting paid what you deserve, PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide offers insight into why you're not already commanding a salary that's commensurate with your skills and experience. For example, if you're like many people, you might be too scared to ask. Of the 57 percent of respondents to PayScale's survey who said that they had never negotiated salary, more than half refrained for reasons that boiled down to fear. Twenty-eight percent of non-negotiators said they were afraid to negotiate salary, while 19 percent didn't want to be perceived as pushy, and 8 percent were afraid of losing their jobs.
  • #MondayMotivation: 10 Tweets to Inspire Productivity (While You're Wasting Time on Twitter)
    It's Monday, and for those of us engaged in post-blizzard cleanup, work is about the furthest thing from our minds. Of course, the difference between a professional and amateur is that professionals show up even when they don't wanna. (Also: money. But showing up is definitely important.) If you're feeling spectacularly unmotivated today, the good citizens of Twitter have your back. These are some of the most inspiring tweets and useful advice at today's #MotivationMonday hashtag party.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do I Get Paid for That Snow Day?
    Snow days aren't as much fun for adults as they are for kids, especially if you're not quite sure what inclement weather means for your paycheck. In this week's roundup, we look at who gets paid during snow days and other days off due to inclement weather, plus how to protect yourself from age discrimination on your resume and what to do right after a networking event.
  • PayScale's Salary Negotiation Reddit AMA: What to Do When Your Employer Says, 'This Is All You Get'
    What would you ask a salary negotiation expert, if you had the chance? Earlier today, PayScale's salary data wizards stopped by Reddit to answer tough questions about the gender pay gap, negotiating starting salary, and what to do when the company says there's no room to negotiate. Here are a few of the highlights from the discussion.
  • Negotiating While Female: How to Get the Salary You Deserve
    First things first: despite what you might have heard, women are not worse negotiators than men. They're not even that much less likely to ask for a raise. Data collected for PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide showed that women reported negotiating salary nearly as often as men: 42 percent of women and 45 percent of men said they'd asked for a raise in their current field. However, research has shown that women are penalized more severely in terms of social costs when they engage in behaviors that appear "aggressive" or "unlikeable" – such as, for example, asking for more cash.
  • 3 Real Ways to Honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at Work
    Starting in the mid-1950s, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s activism set the stage for desegregation, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, but we still haven't reached true equality in the United States, either in private or professional life. For example, African-American workers still earn less and have higher unemployment rates than white workers. But you can help to change that. Here's what you can plan to do at work, starting tomorrow, to honor Dr. King and further his legacy.
  • Fair Pay and Healthcare: 4 Takeaways From the 4th Democratic Debate
    Watching the latest Democratic debate less than a week after the Republican debate, you're immediately struck by the differences between the two parties' events at this stage of the election cycle. It's not just the unsurprising fact that conservatives and liberals disagree on the major issues; it's that the Democrats, who have only three candidates vying for the nomination, have enough time to get into (slightly) more in-depth discussions about their proposals. Barring that, they've at least got more room, both metaphorically and physically on the stage, to argue with one another.

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