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  • These Are the 5 Least Meaningful Jobs (According to the People Who Do Them)
    Even if your job is just for the paycheck, and you get most of your joy and satisfaction after work hours are over, you probably don't want to work at a totally meaningless gig. After all, if you're going to spend at least a third of your life – and most of your waking hours during your workweek – at your job, it'd be nice if you got something out of it besides the means to pay the rent. If meaningful work is important to you, you'll want to take a look at PayScale's latest report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs – special emphasis on these jobs, which workers say are least likely to make the world a better place.
  • What Does 'Job Meaning' Mean, Anyway?
    PayScale's latest report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, looks at which occupations are described by workers as making the world a better place. The jobs that make the list probably won't come as a surprise – surgeon is on there, as is English teacher and clergy member – but that doesn't mean that every high-meaning job looks exactly the same.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: The Case of the Singing Employee
    What's the weirdest thing you've ever seen at the office? For one manager, it's probably the time a report pulled out a harmonica and started singing his status update. The question, of course: is that OK? And if not, how exactly do you tell your subordinate that this is not the opera episode of Mr. Rogers? All that, plus avoiding student mistakes, and how to accept a job offer the right way, in this week's roundup.
  • These Jobs Make the World a Worse Place (Say the People Who Do Them)
    What did you want to be when you grew up? Chances are, it was along the lines of unicorn wrangler or astronaut/basketball player – just the sort of thing that's impossible find a major in, never mind a grownup job. That doesn't mean that all real jobs are boring or unsatisfying; during the compilation of PayScale's latest report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, workers with titles as diverse as English teacher and chiropractor told us that their jobs made the world a better place. And then were the other folks, the ones whose jobs made them long for the days when "vet who specializes only in kittens" seemed like a reasonable career path.
  • The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs
    Does your job make the world a better place? Some professions are more likely to answer "yes" to that question than others – and which ones might surprise you. PayScale's report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, looks at which occupations have high meaning, and which make workers feel like their job is hurting the world more than helping. If you're thinking about changing careers, or just want to see how your job stacks up, this report is for you.
  • Portland, Maine Accidentally Gives Tipped Workers a Raise
    Language matters, especially when it comes to legislation. Recently, we had proof of this when the Affordable Care Act nearly deflated thanks to an alternate interpretation of the phrase "established by the state." Now, city officials in Portland, Maine, find themselves in a similar bind: confusion over the language in a recent bill to raise the city's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour led city council to nearly double tipped workers' wages, from $3.75 to $6.35 an hour, as of January 1. The accidental raise was met with dismay from restaurant owners and delight from labor organizers. Both dismay and delight, however, might be short-lived.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Teachers Really Do With Their 'Summers Off'
    If you're a professor, teacher, or grad student, you're probably sick of hearing people say that you get the summer off. But for non-academic types, it seems like a sweet deal. This week's blog roundup looks at why those summer months aren't as much fun for teachers as they are for students; plus, insight into why feedback is so hard on so many of us, and what to do to really drive your co-workers crazy (if that's your goal).
  • Those Open-Plan Office Blues: 7 Horror Stories to Make You Long for Walls
    Ah, open-plan offices. Proponents say they can encourage creativity and collaboration among staff members, while allowing workers flexibility to decide where in the office inspiration is most likely to strike. Of course, open-office boosters generally have another reason to push for them: fewer walls can mean less square footage per person, which equals lower real estate costs. As commenter Meghan C. said, "What bugs me most about open floor plans is imagining The Powers That Be sitting in their @#$% offices saying how great open floor plans are." If you're not a fan of the wall-free office, these tales of woe, collected from Facebook users, will seem pretty familiar.
  • Ellen Pao's Reddit Resignation Reveals the Enduring Sexism of Tech
    Picture this: a new CEO makes a series of controversial changes to the company's hiring process, policies, and product. Eventually, a popular staffer is fired, and the community revolts, starting a Change.org petition, a hashtag campaign on social media, and even sending death threats. Sound surreal? It might be – if the CEO were male. As former Reddit CEO Ellen Pao's resignation demonstrates, it's not at all a strange set of circumstances for a woman in charge.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Interview Questions to Ask Your Interviewer
    For many of us, it's the one of the worst parts of a job interview – the part where the hiring manager asks you if you have any questions. If you say no, you sound like you don't care about the job, or will take whatever they give you when it's time to negotiate your salary. If you say yes, well, you better have some good questions in mind. This week's roundup looks at a few possible questions to ask the hiring manager, plus issues around figuring out coverage during vacation, and tips on how to build your personal brand.
  • Want a Raise? Have Some Wellness Perks, Instead
    Most of us would prefer a bigger paycheck to a couple of sessions with a lifestyle coach or some free yoga classes. After all, given enough of a raise, you could probably spring for that unlimited card, all by yourself. But given that it's cheaper to sponsor a fitness competition than it is to give everyone at the company a 3 percent pay increase – and that healthier employees equals lower healthcare costs for the employer – you can probably expect to see a lot more emphasis on wellness in years to come.
  • The PayScale Index, Updated: Wages Down for Q2, STEM Salaries Slowing
    The latest update to The PayScale Index, which measures the change in pay for all employed US workers, showed an overall decline in wages of -0.5 percent for the second quarter. This was greater than PayScale's prediction of a -0.1 percent decline. Annual wage growth was +0.3 percent. But not every metro area and industry took an equal hit. STEM-focused jobs, for example, once again saw an even bigger wage slowdown in Q2, despite constant news about growth in tech companies.
  • Let Donald Trump Teach You What Not to Do at Work
    Donald Trump is running for president, and much like your drunkest uncle at a holiday dinner, he's getting the festivities off to a start by insulting absolutely every person on the planet, one box on the census form at a time. His candidacy might inspire guffaws, but it's no joke: as of last week, he was No. 2 in the polls, behind only Jeb Bush, in the race for the Republican nomination. Of course, there are no silver medals in politics, and second in 2015 isn't first in 2016. Still, even if he never wins the nomination, he still has a lot to teach you about your career. Think of it as modeling by negative example.
  • 3 Career Lessons From the US Women's World Cup Victory
    What does a soccer game have to do with your career? If the soccer game in question is last night's World Cup clincher and you're a working woman, a lot. Most of us probably won't experience what it's like to be a world-class athlete fighting for dominance on a global playing field, but even if you're not a sports fan of any stripe, you can learn a lot from the US women's national soccer team.
  • Declare Your Independence From Your Employer (But Not the Way You Think)
    First things first: do not quit your job, without having another one lined up. No matter how lousy your current gig feels, being unemployed is almost certainly worse. However, if you really hate your job, and you're trying not to think about the horror show waiting for you back at the office on the other side of this lovely holiday weekend, we have a few tips to make things better today – no new gig required.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do I Get Paid Extra for Working on the Holiday?
    If you're headed into work this weekend instead of hanging around a barbecue, waiting for the fireworks to start, you're probably already a little annoyed. If you're not getting paid extra for it, you might even upgrade annoyed to downright mad. In this week's roundup, we look at expert advice on determining whether you're likely to get paid more for working holidays – plus, insight on goal-setting and how to redeem a job interview, once it starts going horribly wrong.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 223,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5.3 Percent
    Job growth slowed slightly last month, and the labor force shrank by 432,000 workers, offsetting similarly sized gains in May, according to this morning's Employment Situation Summary. In addition, the Bureau of Labor Statistics revised April and May's reports downward by 60,000 jobs.
  • 'The Best Leap I Ever Took': 10 Career Risks That Paid Off
    Due diligence is important, whether you're taking a new job, making a career change, or starting a business. Sometimes, however, you have to jump and hope for the best. (Hopefully, you know, after some careful planning and building up a cushion of savings to soften your landing.) We asked Facebook users to tell us about the biggest risk they ever took ... and how it made their careers.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 237,000 Jobs in June
    Private payrolls added 237,000 jobs last month, according to The ADP National Employment Report, the most in six months.
  • Obama Will Expand Overtime to 40 Percent of Salaried American Workers
    Yesterday, President Obama announced a rule change that will expand time-and-half eligibility to around 5 million Americans. By raising the overtime threshold from $23,660 a year to $50,440, the president will grant overtime to workers who were previously ineligible for overtime pay, despite earning low wages and working more than 40 hours a week.