• Surprise: The US Is Terrible at Work-Life Balance
    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development recently released its biannual report ranking its member countries for work-life balance. Out of 34 countries, the U.S. came in 29th, beating Australia but trailing Poland. Turkey came in last, with 45 percent of workers pulling 50-hour weeks, and Denmark first, with about 2 percent doing the same. Get out your giant foam fingers and start up the chant: We're 29! We're 29!
  • These Are the 7 Worst Things Readers Have Seen at an Office Holiday Party
    What is it about holiday parties that makes people think they should reenact their college keggers? Perhaps it's dealing with a number of different stressors all at once, from pre-travel work deadlines to holiday shopping to coordinating with teammates who are increasingly checked out. Then, of course, there's the bad-decision potentiating power of alcohol. If there's one thing the following stories have taught us, it's that everyone would be better off starting their January cleanse a few weeks early. Certainly, their careers would thank them.
  • Do Male Managers Really Need a Guide to Working Women?
    This weekend, Joanne Lipman, former deputy managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, offered a slightly different spin on the usual career advice for women hoping to finally achieve pay equity and equal opportunity in the workplace: namely, she focused on men, specifically male managers. Some commentators were less than thrilled.
  • Here's What Workers Cared About in 2014: 10 Most Popular Posts
    Humans are fascinated by the worst-case scenario -- the blown job interview, the botched salary negotiation, the bad college choice. It's not always schadenfreude, either. By analyzing the bad things that could happen, it's easier to prepare and avoid them. This year, PayScale's most popular posts were the ones that helped readers dodge disaster.
  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Hilarious Holiday Tantrums and December Job Searching
    The holidays are a challenging time to be a working person. Half the people you need to talk to seem to be on vacation, or at least mentally checked out, your office is filling up with sugary treats you don't want, but can't stop eating, and the nonstop social whirl seems to bring out the worst in your co-workers. Fortunately, some of PayScale's favorite bloggers and writers have tips on staying healthy and sane during the season -- while maintaining your sense of humor, to boot.
  • Once Again: It's a Bad Idea to Talk About Sensitive Subjects at Work
    How is your workplace similar to your aunt's house during a holiday celebration? Both are bad places to talk about politics, religion, or anything that's liable to get people riled up. Of course, knowing better doesn't necessarily mean doing better.
  • What Code Should You Learn? [infographic]
    Learn to code. It's the advice of career experts everywhere, from high school guidance counselors to mid-career job coaches. But with literally hundreds of languages to choose from, you might find yourself a bit lost as to which language to focus on first -- especially if the goal isn't to become a computer programmer, but rather to boost your career in your current (non-programming) field.
  • Congress Considers Drastic Cuts to Pension Plans
    For the first time ever, Congress may move to cut pension benefits to current retirees. Proposed legislation, which would take the form of an amendment to a $1.1 trillion spending bill, would cut benefits for multiemployer plans, common in the grocery, trucking, and construction industries, and often managed jointly by employers and unions.
  • How Long Should You Stay at Your Job?
    Over a quarter of Millennials think that workers should stay in a role for less than a year before moving on, according to data collected from PayScale's employee survey, and compiled in the report Gen Y on the Job. Only 13 percent of respondents in the same age group thought employees should stay at a job for more than five years. That's a big shift from earlier generations, and sign that job hopping might be gaining in popularity -- at least among workers themselves. Given that companies pay to train and hire workers, however, and hiring managers probably don't want to see a checked employment history, how do you determine the perfect tenure?
  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Better Networks, Freedom From Email Slavery, and Early Retirement
    Which stories shaped your career this week? The big headline is obviously the jobs reports. The ADP report, which is based on payroll data from private employers, showed gains of 208,000 jobs for November. The news from the Bureau of Labor Statistics was even better: non-farm payrolls added 321,000 jobs last month. For workers, this is good news -- but it's not the whole conversation. To see what else is working Americans' minds this week, we turn to some of the most popular career bloggers on the internet.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 321,000 Jobs Added, Beating Expectations
    Prior to this morning's report from the Labor Department, economists were predicting gains of 230,000 jobs for November. Instead, The Employment Situation Summary reported the addition of 321,000 jobs to non-farm payrolls last month. This marks the tenth straight month of 200,000-plus job gains. Unemployment held steady from last month's report at 5.8 percent.
  • 3 Insights for Millennial Workers, From Anne Krook
    There's plenty of handwringing when it comes to the fate of younger workers, but precious little in the way of actual advice on the way to build a career in a tough economic environment. For PayScale's latest data package, Gen Y on the Job, we sat down with Anne Krook, author of "Now What Do I Say?": Practical Workplace Advice for Younger Women, to get actionable insight into how Millennials can make the most of their strengths.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 208,000 Jobs in November
    Private companies added 208,000 jobs to their payrolls last month, according to The ADP National Employment Report. This was lower than economists' predictions of 220,000 jobs, but still in line with the previous six months.
  • This Is What Millennials' Dream Job Looks Like
    What makes a good job great? Well, excellent pay, for one thing. PayScale's various data packages show that money almost always wins, when it comes to workers' priorities -- or, at least, their stated values. Beyond pay, however, there are other job attributes that appeal to workers. Gen Y on the Job looks at what Millennials want most at work, and what they're prepared to compromise on, in order to get it.
  • 3 Ways to Get Ready for Your Year-End Review
    Ninety percent of companies do annual reviews, according to the Society for Human Resource Management, despite the fact that at least 60 percent of workers -- including managers -- dislike the review process. Many organizations compound the problem by having their evaluations at the tail-end of the year, when workers are feeling their least productive and focused. Of course, if your company does things this way, it's unlikely that you'll talk them out of it, no matter how solid your arguments are for change. The best you can do, as a worker, is to prepare.
  • You Sit Too Much; Here's What to Do About It [infographic]
    American workers spend 21 hours a day being sedentary, and only three hours being active, according to research from Ergotron and research firm Research Now. In fact, 86 percent of respondents said that they sit "all day, every day," despite the fact that 70 percent said they hate sitting. Worst of all, more than half of those surveyed said that when they do get up, they use "getting food" as an excuse. Given that most companies aren't going to shell out for treadmill desks for everyone, is there any way to minimize the amount of sitting we're doing?
  • 3 Reasons to Show Gratitude in Your Career (Even When You'd Rather Skip It)
    Have your social media feeds been filling up with thankfulness over the past few days and weeks leading up to Thanksgiving? If these public statements of gratitude make you roll your eyes rather than count your blessings, never fear: we're not here to convince you to join a movement, or even start a journal or buy an app. However, focusing on the positive and remembering the ways in which you're lucky can be good for your career, if you go about things in a way that works for you.
  • Want Your Own Place? Avoid These 5 Jobs
    It's a hard world out there for young workers. PayScale's latest data package, Gen Y on the Job, shows that 24 percent of Millennials have to move home at some point after starting their career. Those numbers are worse if you're a woman: 28 percent of female Gen Y workers have to move in with Mom and Dad. While the economy is obviously a major factor in whether or not you can afford your own place, job selection also makes a difference.
  • Build a Perfect Boss: Here's What Every Generation Wants in a Manager
    What makes a great boss? PayScale's latest report, Gen Y on the Job, asked respondents to rate various managerial characteristics, including the ability to motivate, setting clear directions, organization, friendliness, ambition, and tendency to keep it professional. We learned that regardless of generation, workers want -- and perhaps more significantly, don't want -- similar things from their bosses.
  • How to Be Productive When You'd Rather Be Hibernating
    Having trouble getting out of your own way at work since the days got shorter and colder? The bad news is that spring is a long way off. The good news is that at least you're not alone. Lots of people find it harder to be productive and happy, both at work and at home, during the winter.