• Why You Get Stuck in Conflicts at Work, According to a Harvard Negotiation Expert

    Why do even rational people get embroiled in conflicts they can't solve? The root cause, says Daniel Shapiro, founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program, is an adversarial mindset called the Tribes Effect, in which conflicts turn into "me versus you, us versus them."

    "People think, 'Let's just be rational and we can resolve our differences, we can resolve our conflict,'" Shapiro says. "Not true. Unless you deal with the core psychology to the conflict, the mindset that's driving you and the other side in the conflict, unless you deal with that, the conflict will persist."

  • When You Can't Quit Your Horrible Job, Do These 5 Things
    Short of living with someone you can't stand – sorry, parents of surly teenagers and people with weird Craigslist roommates – there's nothing that will make you unhappier than hating your job. That's partly because most of us spend the bulk of our waking hours at work, and partly because work provides us with a sense of identity. What's the first question you ask someone at a party? Often, it's: "What do you do?"
  • The 5 Best High Schools in the U.S., According to U.S. News
    High school students in the U.S. have a college readiness problem. According to a report from testing organization ACT, only 40 percent of students taking the ACT met three or four college readiness benchmarks, which correlate with stronger likelihood of success in postsecondary education. However, taking college preparatory core curriculum classes increased students' chances of meeting these benchmarks; 49 percent of "core-taking" students met the math benchmark, for example, compared to 27 percent of non-core-taking students. In short, academic preparation in high school is essential to a good college experience – and a successful career after graduation.
  • #MondayMotivation: 5 Ways to Work in Sprints and Rescue Your Productivity
    If you pride yourself on being able to keep a lot of plates spinning at the same time, I'm about to blow your mind: you probably aren't a good multitasker. That's nothing against you. The fact is, most people can only do one thing at a time. The folks who seem to be managing it are really just switching tasks quickly. But, even those super-productive people would be better off focusing. In fact, research shows that task switching could cost up to 40 percent of a worker's productive time.
  • 3 Fast-Growing Green Jobs
    Want to help the environment and your career at the same time? This Earth Day, do more than recycling your disposable coffee cup and heeding your environmentally conscious co-worker's admonition to think twice before you print out emails. Consider a career change to a green job, and give yourself a better shot at job security while saving the planet at the same time. You'd be surprised at how relatively little specialized experience or education you need to change to some (although of course not all) greener occupations.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Does Your Cover Letter Make You Sound Like a Robot?
    Strange as it might seem to most of us, there are people out there who love various parts of the job search process. Some like meeting new people, or feel energized by the interview process; others see exciting new potential in every networking connection or job posting. But even those job-searching Pollyannas would be hard-pressed to find an upside to one part of the process: writing a cover letter that grabs readers' attention, expresses their qualifications, and doesn't mindlessly repeat the same material as their resume. In this week's roundup, we look at one expert's advice on writing a cover letter that reads as if it's written by a human, plus a few reasons why your job hunt is stalled, and tips to make your resume stand out ... even when the hiring manager only takes eight seconds to skim it.
  • #WednesdayWisdom: 3 Salary Negotiation Tips From Self-Made Billionaires
    Take a look at Forbes' World Billionaires list, and one thing becomes apparent: the best financial advice is to be born into wealth. Nearly a third of the world's billionaires come from money, even if they've managed to boost the family fortunes by dint of hard work. If you've neglected to choose your parents well from a financial perspective, the good news of course it that two-thirds of today's billionaires were not born with a Black Amex burning hole in their wallet. Those are the folks to look to, for inspiration in your next salary negotiation (even if you never quite make Facebook-money).
  • Elon Musk's Annual Salary Is Less Than $40k, But Don't Lose Sleep on His Behalf
    According to a recent filing, Tesla CEO Elon Musk was entitled to a $37,584 salary last year. As usual, he didn't take it. (The Wall Street Journal reports that Musk never takes his salary.) However, lest you worry that everyone's favorite real-life Bond villain/superhero is going to have trouble making ends meet, rest assured that he'll probably be able to keep himself in video games; according to the same filing, Musk has achieved 50 percent of the goals required to earn him a $1.6 billion payday by 2022.
  • Is College Still Worth the Money?
    From 2004 to 2014, the average debt for graduating college seniors who took out loans rose at twice the rate of inflation. Meanwhile, the real value of workers' wages is 6.5 percent lower today than it was in 2006, and recent college graduates are more likely to be unemployed or underemployed than they were prior to the recession. It's not unreasonable to look at the data and ask, "Is going to college a good investment for today's young workers?"
  • #MondayMotivation: 10 Quotes About Succeeding Despite the Odds
    Even if you love your job, Monday morning probably isn't your favorite time of the week. For those who supposedly work Monday through Friday, the first morning back after a weekend feels like an abrupt shift, sort of like a miniature version of returning to work after vacation, only without the Instagram-worthy memories. If you're having trouble envisioning success this morning, these quotes will inspire you to turn your thoughts in the right direction.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do I Have to Disclose That I Was Fired?
    Even if you're the best employee in the history of paid work, you might get fired at some point in your career. Sometimes, it's no one's fault: you turned out to be a bad fit for the role and vice versa. Other times, you might have made a mistake, and paid a steep price for it. But the worst scenario is the one that's not your fault at all – but that still potentially haunts your job search afterward. In this week's round-up, we look at what one career expert advises job seekers who've been fired, plus how to repair a damaged professional relationship and how to give tough feedback.
  • How to Quit Your Job Without Making Everyone Hate You
    The average worker has 12 jobs in the course of a career, which means that you can count on leaving a position about 12 times between the start of your working life and retirement. Ideally, most of those job changes will be voluntary, involving a jump to a better gig, with interesting new challenges and a bigger paycheck. But even if everything goes according to your best-laid plans, there's one hurdle you'll have to cross again and again in order to get to where you want to be in your career: you're going to have to quit your job.
  • College ROI Report: Highest Student Loan Payments Made By Those Who Can Least Afford Them
    College may be more expensive than ever before, but the cost of not going to college is pretty steep, as well. For the most part, college graduates earn more, have lower unemployment rates, and are less likely to live in poverty than their less-educated peers. But that doesn't mean that it's easy to pay student loans with a recent graduate's salary (or potential lack thereof, depending on the job market upon graduation). In fact, PayScale's College ROI Report shows that the highest college loans are likely to be held by the borrowers with the lowest income.
  • Yes, the Gender Pay Gap Is Real, and No, It's Not Women's Fault
    Women don't ask, so they don't get. Or: women should wait their turn, and let karma sort it out. Or: women choose low-paying jobs, and/or work fewer hours, so they shouldn't expect to be paid as much as a man. There's just one problem with all of these explanations for why the gender pay gap isn't real, or at least, isn't really an issue that needs solving: they're all nonsense.
  • The Gender Pay Gap Is Worse for Women of Color
    When we talk about pay inequity, especially on Equal Pay Day, we generally talk about the differences between men's earnings and women's earnings – meaning all men and all women, without regard to race. To really unpack the problem, however, we need to dig further into the data and look at how race and ethnicity impacts earnings. Bottom line: the gender pay gap is particularly bad for women of color.
  • #EqualPayDay: 10 Quotes to Inspire You to Fight for Pay Equity

    Equal Pay Day is the date when women's pay symbolically "catches up" with men's earnings from the previous year. This year, April 12 is the big day: the average woman has now made as much money, from Jan 1, 2015 until today, as the average man did by New Year's Eve 2015.

    There are a lot of reasons why women earn less than men. PayScale's report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap, show that even in similar roles, controlling for education, experience, and hours worked, women make less money than men. Unconscious bias is a factor, as is "job choice"; women are more likely than men to work at low-paying jobs, and less likely than men to be in leadership roles.

  • #MondayMotivation: 5 People Who Found Success After 40
    It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking that career success strikes either early or not at all. The media loves stories about wunderkinds who make their mark (and their fortune) when they're barely old enough to rent a car. But your career doesn't stop when you turn 30, or 40, or 50. If you've been putting off following your dreams because you think it's too late to change careers, take inspiration from these famous folks – none of whom were a household name until middle age.
  • College ROI Report: These 5 Schools Offer the Highest Return on Investment

    Money might not buy happiness, but lack of money can sure set you up for a world of misery. Just ask any of the 6.9 million Americans – as of July, 2015 – who hadn't made a payment on their federal students in 360 days. In fact, about 17 percent of all borrowers were severely delinquent in paying their student loans last year. Why? Well, for one thing, it's hard to stay on top of your loans if you can't get a job with a salary high enough to pay them.

    For this reason, PayScale's College ROI Report is a valuable tool for entering students. While of course college choice needs to be based on a variety of factors like career goals, interests, and aptitude, thinking about life after graduation, professionally and financially, is also key. College isn't just vocational training, but if you're going to get into debt, you need to set yourself up to get a job that will allow you to pay off those loans.

  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Master the Sneaky Job Hunt
    The best time to look for a job might well be when you have a job, but that doesn't mean it's easy to engage in a lengthy interview process while you're still employed. This week's roundup looks at ways to do that without tipping off the boss – or at least, without alienating him or her. Also in the roundup: the never-fail job search tips you're probably ignoring, and ways to include testimonials on your resume, so there's no way hiring managers can miss how impressive you are.
  • 2016 PayScale College ROI Report Shows How Household Income Affects Earnings After Graduation
    The poor often stay poor – even if they're college graduates. This year, for the first time, PayScale's annual College ROI Report looks at how household income prior to attending college relates to income after graduation. In short, students who enter college from lower-income households don't see the same return on their tuition investment as students who start off with more money in their pockets.

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