• 5 Ways to Take Back Your Commute
    The popular wisdom is that commuting makes workers unhappy and unhealthy -- even unproductive. But knowing that a shorter commute would make your working life better isn't really helpful if you don't have the option to work closer to home. So how can you make the best of a bad situation?
  • 10 Signs You're Facing Job Burnout
    Did you drag yourself into the office today? Maybe it's just the normal Monday morning gear-shift -- or maybe it's a sign of a bigger problem. If it's getting harder and harder to go to work, and you're getting less done while you're there, it's time to consider whether you're dealing with job burnout, and not just normal day-to-day stress.
  • 5 Tips for Managing an Introvert
    Introverts sometimes get a bad rap in today's business world, portrayed alternately as antisocial types who can't work on teams or reclusive geniuses that are best used in moderation. In fact, successful teams are often a mixture of extroverts and introverts. The key to supporting your more inner-directed reports is understanding what makes them tick and how to give them the best shot at success, both for their own sake and that of the company.
  • 5 Ways to End Your Workweek on a High Note
    What do you do at work on Friday afternoons? Mobile devices and online access to the tools we use to do our jobs have made it harder to hide out under our desks and wait for the factory whistle to blow. Still, after a long, hard week, it's easy to let burnout overwhelm you. Don't just coast through the last minutes and hours of your workweek. Use your time wisely, and you'll have a more pleasant weekend, and start next week off fresh and ready to work.
  • In Praise of the Office Eeyore
    Given their druthers, many would prefer to work with a moderately cheerful colleague, instead of someone who tends to see the dark side of a situation, but maybe they should reconsider. Studies suggest that our gloomier colleagues might have a valuable perspective to offer -- one that relentlessly positive types might not be able to duplicate.
  • Beyond Good Luck: A Sense of Control Increases Motivation, Productivity, and Achievement
    As long as workers can attribute their wins to luck, they don't have to feel bad about their losses. Of course, the downside to that is that they also don't get to take credit for their success. If you want to motivate your team to take responsibility, learn from their mistakes, and excel in their work, you might consider applying attribution theory.
  • What Really Makes Us Love Our Jobs
    If your boss has seemed more than usually solicitous of your happiness on the job over the past few months, you might have Gallup to thank (or blame, depending on your point of view). The organization released research late last year that showed that only 29 percent of US employees were engaged at work. As a result, some organizations panicked, worrying that disengaged workers wouldn't produce, and began to focus on making employees happy. There's just one problem: according to Gallup's CEO, focusing on making workers happy doesn't improve productivity or make them enjoy their jobs more.
  • 3 Ways to Get Along With Your Least Favorite Co-Workers
    Don't burn your bridges, the advice goes. There's just one problem: over the course of a career, even the most cautious and honorable professional is bound to leave a few behind them. So what can you do to rebuild a relationship, once it's damaged?
  • How to Apologize the Right Way
    Have you ever worked with someone who absolutely will not apologize, no matter how clearly he or she was at fault? It might not be stubbornness. Many people avoid saying they're sorry at work, working under the assumption that their mea culpa will come off as an admission of weakness. The tricky thing is, they're not entirely wrong.
  • How to Stop Beating Yourself Up for Mistakes at Work

    What's the most stressful thing that ever happened to you at work? If you're like most of us, making a mistake is at least in the top five. The problem, of course, is that there's no way to avoid messing up at some point. As the saying goes, if you never make mistakes, you're not working hard enough. The real challenge is to learn how to be kinder to yourself afterward, and set yourself up for future success.

  • Are Activity Trackers Any Match for Slouchy Office Workers?

    Chances are, you know at least one person who's in love with her Fitbit or Fuelband, and its calorie- and step-counting assistance -- especially if you work in an office, where workers spend more time sitting than improving their health. Now, one company is offering an activity tracker that measures an additional element of fitness: good posture.

  • 3 Ways to Negotiate Your Way to a Happier Job

    Once you make enough money to pay the bills, a bigger salary won't necessarily buy you happiness. But if you can arrange your job so that you have more autonomy and purpose, and better work-life balance, you just might feel a little bit more cheerful about heading off to work in the morning.

  • When You Need to Tell the Boss Something She Doesn't Want to Hear

    No one wants to be a yes man or woman, but after a couple of years of post-recession economic gloom and job instability, it's hard to feel comfortable telling the boss bad news. Unfortunately, in order to do your job well, you'll have to learn how to discuss tough topics with your manager. Here's how to do it.

  • 8 Things New Hires Should Do in the First Few Weeks
    You might assume that the first few days and weeks at a new job are pretty much a loss, in terms of productivity. Other than filling out paperwork, attending whatever training your organization provides, and meeting your co-workers, there's not much you can do to hit the ground running, right? Not necessarily. If you make the most out of those first few weeks on the job, you can set yourself up for success later on. Here's how.
  • 5 Success Tips for Introverts

    Most workplaces are pretty much nightmares for introverts. From open plan offices, to collaborative corporate cultures, to endless meetings and team projects, it's pretty clear that the modern world of work was designed with extroverts in mind. If you're introverted, making your mark at work will take a little creative thinking.

  • 5 Tips to Sharpen Your Focus and Boost Productivity
    In today’s information-overload age, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to maintain focus on everyday tasks, which can be detrimental to your productivity. Here are a few proven ways to help find your concentration throughout the day.
  • How to Love Giving Presentations (Yes, Really!)

    In a perfect work world, we'd only have to do the things we're good at and enjoy. Introverts would be left alone to work on one-person projects, and only professional actors and PowerPoint enthusiasts would ever have to give a presentation. No surprise: we don't live in that perfect world. But that doesn't mean that every public speaking situation has to be a nightmare for you or your career.

  • 6 Questions to Ask Yourself Before You Say, 'I Quit!'
    You desperately want to move out of your current job, but you don’t have a strong enough reason to justify it. You just very strongly feel it’s time to use your "I Quit" card. Before you take the plunge, hold onto that card just a while longer, as we help you through your decision.
  • 5 Career Lessons From Joan Rivers

    Yesterday, Joan Rivers passed away at the age of 81. Celebrities remembered her on Twitter as a comedy icon, but most importantly, as one of the hardest working comedians in the business. Here's how her career can inspire you, no matter what you do for a living.

  • 5 Management Tips: How to Encourage a Better Attitude in Your Reports

    There's a difference between constructive criticism and, well, whining. If your team is doing more of the latter these days, you don't have to stand by and let negativity take over. There are steps you can take to make sure that you still hear feedback but don't encourage aimless complaining.