• Gaming, Craft Beer, and Cannabis Cultivation – 3 New Fields of Study for College Students
    Our economy is changing. The idea that many of the jobs that will be available 10 years from now don't exist today, is more true now than it has ever been. But, it's not just the tech industry that's moving our culture along. Many new professions await today's students, and universities are always trying to anticipate, and prepare for, these future opportunities. In response to the growth of some surprising industries, colleges are offering more and more outside-the-box fields of study that might be a little more than tempting to today's students. Come to think of it, many of yesterday's college students might have enjoyed them as well....
  • 3 Tips for Meeting With a Career Coach
    At any point in your career, meeting with a career coach could be beneficial. But, most people hire one when their professional lives reach a critical juncture. When you are changing positions, working toward different goals, making a geographic change, or switching industries or professional direction, a career coach can provide valuable insights and strategies that help you get where you'd like to be.
  • The Art of the (E-mail) Close
    Signing off as "Salty" instead of "Sally." Including 18 line items in your signature block, including your parents' home number. Forgetting that you already pushed "send" on your daily e-mail to your mom, and closing the subsequent e-mail to your boss with, "Love, Sean XOXO." Realizing that upon sending said e-mail to your boss, you accidentally hit "reply all" and thus also sent your hugs and kisses to your entire team. The ways we can bungle a professional e-mail are endless and there is arguably no worse way than how we sign off.
  • 4 Jobs for Sociology Majors, Other Than Social Worker
    First things first: most sociology majors won't earn as much money as STEM majors, post-graduation. But when you're choosing a major, it's important to follow your interests as well as considering money. The study of human behavior, how people interact within different structures, and how people relate to each other, is utterly fascinating to many people. If this rings true for you, than majoring in sociology could be a path to consider.
  • How Long Should You Stay at Your Job?
    Over a quarter of Millennials think that workers should stay in a role for less than a year before moving on, according to data collected from PayScale's employee survey, and compiled in the report Gen Y on the Job. Only 13 percent of respondents in the same age group thought employees should stay at a job for more than five years. That's a big shift from earlier generations, and sign that job hopping might be gaining in popularity -- at least among workers themselves. Given that companies pay to train and hire workers, however, and hiring managers probably don't want to see a checked employment history, how do you determine the perfect tenure?
  • 3 Ways Learning a Language Could Boost Your Career
    The world has changed so much in the last couple of decades. Technology has shifted the way we work in fundamental ways. As a result, skills that used to be highly valued in a professional context have become less important, and other skills and talents are coming into sharper focus. Professionals need to bring something to the table that can't be achieved by a machine. Traits like creative talent, an ability to multitask, and excellent interpersonal skills are becoming increasingly important. Learning a new language might give you that extra edge you've been searching for.
  • 5 Reasons You Need a Mentor – and How to Find One
    After years of training and education, you've finally landed a great position in your field. But no matter how much preparation you've done, a mentor could help your career, and assist you personally, in profound ways.
  • 4 Tiny Changes That Will Help You Work Smarter, Not Harder
    Many of us live to work, rather than work to live. According to the Department of Labor, the average American between the ages of 25-54 with children spends a whopping 8.7 hours on "working and related activities" each day, but only one hour on "eating and drinking" and two-and-half on "leisure and sports." While you're unlikely to convince the boss to let you cut your day short in favor of spending more time watching TV, you might be able to make a few small changes that boost productivity and get you out the door as soon as possible. Plus, if you take care of yourself, your time at work will be more pleasant.
  • 3 Reasons to Show Gratitude in Your Career (Even When You'd Rather Skip It)
    Have your social media feeds been filling up with thankfulness over the past few days and weeks leading up to Thanksgiving? If these public statements of gratitude make you roll your eyes rather than count your blessings, never fear: we're not here to convince you to join a movement, or even start a journal or buy an app. However, focusing on the positive and remembering the ways in which you're lucky can be good for your career, if you go about things in a way that works for you.
  • Want Your Own Place? Avoid These 5 Jobs
    It's a hard world out there for young workers. PayScale's latest data package, Gen Y on the Job, shows that 24 percent of Millennials have to move home at some point after starting their career. Those numbers are worse if you're a woman: 28 percent of female Gen Y workers have to move in with Mom and Dad. While the economy is obviously a major factor in whether or not you can afford your own place, job selection also makes a difference.
  • The Best Way to Stay Excited About Your Work: Take a Job You're Not Quite Qualified For
    We spend so much of our lives at work. While making money, having good benefits, and experiencing marked success are important, it might also be nice to actually be excited about the job you do. The benefits of having enthusiasm about your work, and passion for your job, are not to be underestimated, and staying challenged and stimulated by your occupation might just be the key.
  • 3 Reasons Not to Major in Business
    Business administration has long been the most popular undergraduate major in American colleges and universities. There is no doubt that students acquire valuable skills, such as leadership and decision making, through the coursework. However, that doesn't mean it's a sure path to a successful career.
  • Many Americans Would Improve Their Career Before Health or Relationships [Infographic]
    A new survey from Huffington Post reveals some surprising results about what makes Americans happy. Namely, nearly one-third of those surveyed would choose to improve their career or finances over their health or their relationships.
  • Study Reveals the 5 Scariest Jobs this Halloween
    Just in time for Halloween, CareerBuilder has released the results of a study that surveyed over 3,000 American workers about the jobs they fear most. If you’re looking for a good scare this season, just imagine yourself in one of the following positions.
  • 3 Reasons You Didn't Get the Job
    Every job interview, even a bad one, is an opportunity to learn something about how to pitch yourself to companies, and figure out what a given job entails and what the corporate culture has to offer. The problem, of course, is that hiring managers don't always tell you why the company opted to pass, which makes it harder to learn from your mistakes. Here's what might be holding you back, and how to tweak your approach to improve your chances in the future.
  • At Work, It's Better to be a Father Than a Mother
    While working mothers struggle with decreased pay and lack of status in a workplace that sees them as unreliable, working fathers enjoy improved status, pay, and benefits that help a growing family survive.
  • Why Millennials Shouldn't 'Do What They Love'
    These days, it seems like the most popular career advice -- especially for the younger generation -- is not to just find a job. Instead, everyone from thought leaders to popular bloggers are advising recent college graduates to ditch the traditional hunt for high-paying dream occupations (such as doctor and lawyer) and instead “do what you love.”
  • How to Get the CEO to Respond to Your Email

    Would you email Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg, or Marissa Mayer? If the answer is no -- and you have something to say -- maybe it's time to ask yourself why.

  • When to Quit a Job You Love

    Last week, we talked about how to tell when your body is telling you you need to quit your job. Sometimes, however, you might feel great about your job -- or at least, like it just fine -- but still need to quit for various reasons. It's not always obvious; learn to spot subtle signs and the writing on the wall.

  • 5 Ways to Change Careers Without Starting From Scratch

    When we talk about career changes, we often speak in leaps, e.g. lawyers who become history teachers or executives who leave big business to start their own mom-and-pop shops. But what about the smaller career evolutions, the kind that don't require a lot of extra education or training to effect? Here's how to make a career change that's a lot easier and less frightening than jumping into a strange new occupation.