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  • Want Your Kids to Be Successful? Don't Quit Your Day Job, Says Harvard Study
    Listen up, working moms. It's time to put your guilt-ridden thoughts aside and start celebrating the fact that you are a mother with a thriving career, because children of working moms are more successful than their peers. Says who? Harvard Business School, that's who. Here's what you need to know.
  • 'The Best Leap I Ever Took': 10 Career Risks That Paid Off
    Due diligence is important, whether you're taking a new job, making a career change, or starting a business. Sometimes, however, you have to jump and hope for the best. (Hopefully, you know, after some careful planning and building up a cushion of savings to soften your landing.) We asked Facebook users to tell us about the biggest risk they ever took ... and how it made their careers.
  • LinkedIn Is Being the Change It Wants to See for Women in Tech
    The bad news is that STEM has a woman problem. The good news is that everyone is pretty aware of it now and some companies are trying to fix this problem. Last year, LinkedIn announced its Women in Tech (WIT) initiative, which aims to empower the women in tech roles at the company to transform themselves, their careers, and the company – and, by golly, it seems to be working! We'll take a look at how LinkedIn is "tackling this imbalance head-on" and making a difference for women in tech, now and in the future.
  • Let's Stop Asking Kids What They Want to Be When They Grow Up
    If you stop and think about it, it's pretty amazing how early we start talking with children about their future career choices. Although we don't really take the question seriously (and our kids are most likely just playing along) the tried-and-true kid conversation starter, "What do you want to be when you grow up?" is asked, often, to even our youngest children. By age 3 or 4, a lot of kids have even worked out a pat response.
  • Liberal Arts Proponents Fight Back Against the Haters
    The number of graduates majoring in the humanities and social sciences in the U.S. has declined in recent years, and liberal arts institutions are making a concerted effort to change the perception that humanities and social science degrees cannot lead to profitable careers.
  • What Nasty Gal Can Teach Us About the Importance of Corporate Culture
    If there's anyone who understands the term "rags to riches," it's Nasty Gal founder Sophia Amoruso, who built an online apparel empire from the ground up. However, according to some current and former Nasty Gal employees, the company's once-vibrant corporate culture isn't what it used to be, thanks to layoffs and restructuring. We'll examine how a company's culture can quickly go south and how to protect yourself from being blindsided in your career.
  • Queen Bee Syndrome Is Not a Thing
    Women, amirite? When they're not weeping or scheming, they're tearing each other down at work. Or, at least, that's how the theory goes. It's called Queen Bee Syndrome, and it's occupied a place in workplace lore for as long as women have been represented in the labor force. There's just one problem. A recent study shows that it's probably not true.
  • Pay It Forward: The CEO Giving Employees' Kids a Full Ride to College
    One CEO is taking employee benefits to the next level – the next generation, to be exact. Boxed CEO Chieh Huang is offering to pay college tuition for all of his employees' children as an incentive to remain loyal to the online wholesaler. Seem too good to be true?
  • STEM Is Important, But Let's Not Forget About the Humanities
    There's no doubt that advanced technology is the future, but just because studying STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) can lead to lucrative careers, doesn't mean that business no longer has any use for the humanities. We'll take a look at why society's obsession with STEM is blinding us to the importance of the more human side of business now and in the future.
  • Tweet Like a Man, and Get More Retweets
    A recent study showed that men get retweeted more than women. The question is, why? We'll examine the science behind why tweets published by men are, on average, more popular than those by women and how professionals can apply this knowledge to their enhance their career potential, regardless of gender.
  • This Is Why So Many New Teachers Quit
    Teacher retention has been a big problem in education for quite some time. Roughly half a million U.S. teachers leave the profession each year, and faculty attrition costs the United States up to $2.2 billion annually, according to a report from the Alliance for Excellent Education. So, why is teacher retention such a persistent and pervasive problem?
  • Slack's New Podcast: Stories About Work
    The Silicon Valley company, Slack, which is led by Flickr cofounder Stewart Butterfield, aims to change the way teams communicate in these here modern times. Their app, which makes work more fun (but might keep you there), is gaining popularity in workplaces, and alternative work spaces, across the county.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Quiz – Are You Living Up to Your Full Potential?
    When we were in school, guidance counselors checked in with us to see how we were progressing. As adults, well, let's just say we could go a long time without thinking about whether we're still headed in the right direction. This week's roundup looks at a simple quiz to help workers be their own guidance counselors. Plus: how to kill collaboration, not that you'd want to, and how to work with those co-workers you wish would find another job.
  • 5 Tips for Graduates From Economists
    Graduating from college is an exciting, and simultaneously scary, time in one's life. The future feels open and vast, and the opportunities seem endless yet somehow also slightly out of reach. It's a great time to look to others for advice and guidance in order to make good decisions and move toward a positive next step.
  • The 5 Best States for Teachers
    Teaching is difficult work. However, some factors (such as compensation and teacher/student ratio) can make a big difference. Recently, WalletHub examined 50 states plus the District of Columbia using 18 metrics in order to determine the best and worst states for teachers.
  • Why 'Do What You Love' Is Bad Advice
    With just about every presidential candidate's campaign in full swing, one group we keep hearing about (and will continue to) is all of the ordinary, everyday Americans: The ones who are taking the brunt of the economic downturn, the ones who need someone to stand up for them, and the ones who need decent paying jobs to provide for their Norman Rockwell, picture-perfect American families. So what's the most popular suggestion for what these everyday Americans should do for work? DWYL – "do what you love."
  • Jon Stewart Comes Clean About His Top-Secret Bootcamp for Vets
    Jon Stewart has long showed his support for soldiers and veterans, even as he's been a vocal critic of the Iraq War. So, it's not a surprise that he's now being credited for a training program to help veterans break into the entertainment industry.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Find Meaning at Work
    A 2014 survey by The Energy Project found that workers who find meaning in their work have 1.7 times higher job satisfaction, are 1.4 times more engaged in their jobs, and are three times more likely to stay at their employer. In short, if you want to enjoy what you do – and keep doing it – the most important factor may well be whether or not you find meaning in it. But what if, like many recent grads and newly minted professionals, you don't find much purpose in your 9 to 5? Then, it's time to get creative.
  • 5 Things Working Mothers Really Want in Their Careers
    Women comprise nearly half of today's workforce. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 47.7 percent of households are dual-income, with both the husband and wife working. What's more, approximately 70 percent of these women are also mothers, who handle a vast majority of the household responsibilities along with their careers. It's not surprising, then, that working mothers are struggling to keep up with the high demands of juggling their personal and professional lives simultaneously. Here's what working mothers need in order to get a fair shot at attaining their goals in and out of the workplace.
  • 6 Things to Do When You Make a Mistake at Work
    We all make mistakes. It's part of life. But, that doesn't make it any easier to recover (in the eyes of others and within yourself) when you misstep at work. We're not talking about navigating a difference of opinion here, but rather an actual error that's plain as day for all to see and know. It can be hard to move through a time or situation where you've fumbled, but it's really important to recover and handle your mistakes in a positive way. Here are some tips.