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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: When the Micromanager ... Is You
    No one likes being micromanaged, but being a micromanager is almost worse: you know, on some level, that you're the problem, and yet you just can't stop nitpicking everything people do. In this week's roundup, career experts tackle breaking the micromanaging habit, learning how to fight productively, and beating the dreaded cover-letter writer's block.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Old School Skills, Salary Negotiation Don'ts, and Lies Happy People Don't Buy
    How can you tell a happy person from, well, everyone else? Often, it's that they spend less time tracking what other people think, and more time paying attention to their own goals. This week's roundup includes the false assumptions happy people don't make, plus a post on why we should thank our high school teachers for those classes we hated, and tips on what to avoid when negotiating salary.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Draft Your Team Like an NFL Manager, How Depression Affects Your Job, and Answering the Second Most-Awkward Interview Question
    Even if you're not into sports, you can learn a lot about leadership -- good and bad -- from watching the managers of professional sports teams. It all comes down to using data to help you make better decisions. Plus, also in this week's roundup: how depression affects working memory, and thus our productivity, and the best way to answer, "Why are you looking for a new job?"
  • 3 Ways to Magically Transform Yourself Into a Lucky Person
    Even if you're not superstitious, it's hard not to ascribe other people's good fortune to luck. Everyone knows that one person who seems to always be in the right place at the right time, getting more than their fair share of promotions, raises, and desks near the window. (Understanding, of course, that their fair share should be "equal to or less than you're getting.") So how do these folks do it?
  • What a Good Boss Does That Others Don't
    Bad managers are the No. 1 reason workers leave their jobs, so the importance of having (and being) and good boss can't be overstated. The problem, of course, is that it's difficult to arrive at a consensus of what this means. What is it, exactly, that good managers do and bad managers don't?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup:  Kickstart Your Workday, Career Lessons at Age 23, and Why Cover Letters Still Exist
    How do you start your workday? If you, like many of us, are generally a little bit late, it could be by grabbing the caffeinated beverage of your choice and hurriedly scanning your inbox. But maybe it's time for a reboot.
  • Is It Better to Stand Out at Work, or to Hide?
    So, you've got a job. You can breathe a sigh of relief. And, for some workers, just having a job is enough. You're hearing all that great news about the uptick in the economic projections, employment is up, and the job market in general looks more hopeful. But, here's the thing: Just because you have a job doesn't mean you shouldn't be consciously making an effort to improve yourself and your position. The question is, how to do that without sticking your neck out and courting disaster.
  • No One Listens to Chicken Little
    Want to ensure that none of your co-workers listen to a word you say? Be the office Chicken Little. While cautious skepticism definitely has its place in any team environment, consistently negative people are unlikely to be heard -- even if they have something important to say.
  • 5 Easy Ways to Be Happier at Work
    In a perfect world, we'd be able to walk away from less-than-awesome jobs, preferably after making a well-scripted scene that somehow has no lasting repercussions for our professional futures. In real life, however, being able to ditch an unwanted job at a moment's notice is as rare as a meet-cute on public transit with the love of your life. It's the stuff of romantic comedies, in other words. If you want to improve your life immediately, your best bet isn't ditching your job; it's learning how to make your life better while you sneakily make long-term plans to secure new employment.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Quit Your Job, Become a Social Introvert, and Change Your Attitude
    One of the toughest things about life, both personally and professionally, is that there's only so much you can control. You can't change your nature, for example, and become wildly extroverted if you're someone who draws her energy from within, and you can't necessarily make a bad job into a good one. You can, however, learn to make things better by cultivating certain skills and improving your attitude. And sometimes, you can quit your job and go on to another one -- if you go about things the right way.
  • 5 Inappropriate Workplace Touching Lessons From Joe Biden
    Maybe you're a hugger, or a back-slapper, or -- in your personal life -- a terrible flirt. Chances are, you know that none of this behavior will fly in the office, no matter how innocent your intentions. No one wants to be referred to HR for remedial training or, worse, lose their jobs because they didn't get the memo that it's 2015, and co-workers don't touch each other. In this, we are probably more with the program than many of our leaders in Washington. Take, for example, America's touchy-feeler-in-chief, Joe Biden.
  • 4 Things You Must Do After Your Annual Performance Review
    Your annual performance review is over. Hopefully, you have some new goals to work on and a few pats on the back to keep you motivated. Now what?
  • 10 Tips to Help You Succeed as a New Manager
    Maybe you've been a great individual contributor, and your stellar performance has made management realize your potential and promote you. Or, you just cracked the interview so well, your new employer was willing to take the risk of hiring you as a manager, even though you've not had any people management experience. Either way, you do want to excel in your new role. Here's how.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Wisdom From a Professional Matchmaker, Balancing Work and Marriage, and Learning to Love Yourself
    Wish you felt more passionate about your work? Maybe it's time to make Hallmark's favorite random holiday into a celebration of career love, instead. In this week's very special Valentine's Day edition of PayScale's blog roundup, we have insight into dealing with difficult clients (courtesy of a former professional matchmaker), the financial and emotional risks of starting a business with your own funds, and tips for defeating impostor syndrome.
  • How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love Failure
    Is there anything more useless than fear of failure? It's vestigial, like the tailbone or the appendix. And yet, humans seem to have an ingrained discomfort with the idea that their efforts won't succeed 100 percent of the time. Here's why you should keep fighting against your nature.
  • In Praise of the Office Frenemy
    If you're a reasonable person -- and let's assume that you are -- you probably don't expect to love every single one of your co-workers. On the other hand, unless you're a terrible pessimist, or having a really rough patch in your career, you probably also don't expect to hate them all, either. Now, a new study argues that perhaps your most valuable co-worker is the one who inspires both positive and negative emotions in somewhat equal measure: the office frenemy, if you will. Here's why you need the folks you (occasionally) love to hate.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Nice Guys Finish First, Fixing Work Mistakes, and TMI at Job Interviews
    If you've been on a few job interviews -- or even conducted them yourself -- you know that the most qualified candidate isn't always the one who gets the job. Sometimes, it's a matter of which applicant seems like they'll fit in the best, and sometimes it's just a question of who seems like the person who'd be the most pleasant to have around the office.
  • What We Can Learn From Pete Carroll: How to Explain a Bad Call on the Fly
    The sound you heard yesterday was a cry of anguish going up in the PayScale offices, as the Seahawks lost the Super Bowl at the last possible moment. Offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell called a slant pass that resulted in quarterback Russell Wilson throwing an interception, giving the game to the Patriots ... and spurring a lot of not-even-Monday-morning quarterbacking by critics eager to point the finger at coach Pete Carroll. Carroll's response shows us a lot about how to handle bad calls in our own working life.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Gen Y Can Learn From Farmers, How PT Workers Can Manage Expectations, and Finding Office Space at Home
    Sometimes, the best career advice comes from unexpected places. For example, most office workers wouldn't think to turn to agricultural experts for wisdom -- but maybe they should.
  • 5 Career Lessons From Marshawn Lynch
    The Seattle-based staff of PayScale is pretty excited about Sunday's big game, when the Seahawks will face off against the Patriots in Arizona. But even if you're not a Seahawks fan, chances are that you appreciate their running back, Marshawn Lynch, nicknamed "Beast Mode" for his aggressive style on the field. Off the field, he's become possibly the most quotable player of all time -- while insisting that he's boycotting media. Witness yesterday's press conference, where Lynch said nothing but "I'm just here so I won't get fined." Twenty-nine times.