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  • Spot These 5 Signs of a Bad Employer, During the Interview
    First things first: there's no way to tell, with absolute certainty, what it will be like to work for a company before you sign on the dotted line. That said, you can do your due diligence ahead of time to figure out whether the corporate culture is a good fit for you and up your chances of making the right choice. Research the company on the internet and pay attention to its interactions with employees and customers on social media -- but most of all, watch for these important signs when you meet with the hiring manager during your interview.
  • 3 Reasons Why Recruiters 'Heart' Passive Candidates
    It's a common dilemma, really. You're gainfully employed, but you also can't help but think that there are greener pastures with another employer. However, your current job isn't that bad, so you're not really an active job seeker -- it'd just be nice to know what career options are available. If this is you, then read on to see why you are a recruiter's dream come true. Here's why.
  • 5 Reasons to Quit Your Job
    No matter how many 200,000-plus job reports the Bureau of Labor Statistics cranks out, the economy is a long way from supporting the decision to quit your job on a whim. But, there are circumstances under which an accelerated plan of departure makes sense. If any of these conditions exist at your job, it's time to start buffing up your resume and calling old co-workers for coffee dates.
  • 8 Reasons Why Volunteering Is Good for You (and Your Career)
    Whether you are in-between jobs or looking to change your line of work, volunteering can be a good proposition to keep yourself engaged and busy. If you are considering entering the non-profit sector, what better way to break in than volunteering? (Especially if you didn't get the interview call, in spite of your resume updates.)
  • 9 Job Fair Tips to Get You Hired
    Job fairs don't end in offers, but they do help candidates get a foot in the door of their targeted organization. Depending on your experience level, a job fair maybe a good place to meet prospective employers, connect with HR personnel, and expand your network.
  • 8 Tips to Prepare for a Panel Interview
    The recruiter sounds very excited on the phone: "I've scheduled you for a panel interview with our managers next Tuesday a.m. I look forward to meeting with you. Do you have any questions for me?" You hear "panel interview" and you freeze. Handling one interviewer at a time is a task, so a panel interview is not exactly the best news. But hold on, before you sweat the phone out of your hand. Understand a bit more about panel interviews to know how to ace them.
  • Aim Higher, and Get the Job
    Are you going on a lot of interviews, but not getting any offers? The problem might be that you're setting your sights too low.
  • Fake These 5 Characteristics, and Seem More Confident
    When you feel confident, the people you interact with in your career are more likely to reward you with the things you want, whether it's a job or a promotion or a raise or a parking space closer to the front door. This is potentially pretty unfair, of course, since anyone who's worked with other humans for more than a day knows that confidence isn't always an indicator of competence. So what can you do, if you're deserving, but underappreciated -- and not burdened with an excess of self-regard? Game the system, and fake it until you make it.
  • How to Get a New Job, Without Changing Companies
    If you are looking for a change, it is often possible to look for a job within your company. A cross-functional exposure that enhances your skill-set, or even a move to a different team that performs the same job as you, could help your career. An internal transfer offers you the opportunity to network and work with various colleagues, clients, and partners. It also helps you learn and deal with various leadership styles and team dynamics.
  • 6 Reasons Why You Should Continue Your Job Search in December
    If you think that December is a month to slack on your job search, you may be seriously mistaken. Don’t lose out on what can be a great month to land an offer. Here, we give you six reasons to focus on your job hunt even while the year comes to an end.
  • Here's What Workers Cared About in 2014: 10 Most Popular Posts
    Humans are fascinated by the worst-case scenario -- the blown job interview, the botched salary negotiation, the bad college choice. It's not always schadenfreude, either. By analyzing the bad things that could happen, it's easier to prepare and avoid them. This year, PayScale's most popular posts were the ones that helped readers dodge disaster.
  • How Long Should You Stay at Your Job?
    Over a quarter of Millennials think that workers should stay in a role for less than a year before moving on, according to data collected from PayScale's employee survey, and compiled in the report Gen Y on the Job. Only 13 percent of respondents in the same age group thought employees should stay at a job for more than five years. That's a big shift from earlier generations, and sign that job hopping might be gaining in popularity -- at least among workers themselves. Given that companies pay to train and hire workers, however, and hiring managers probably don't want to see a checked employment history, how do you determine the perfect tenure?
  • Why You Should Never Lie During the Job Interview Process
    Whatever you do, don’t blatantly lie -- not on your resume, not in the interview. There are only two outcomes to lying for a job: you get caught and you don’t get caught. Either way, the impact of your lie can be long-lasting. It can surface at any point, during an investigation, a job promotion, even a transfer.
  • 3 Reasons to Show Gratitude in Your Career (Even When You'd Rather Skip It)
    Have your social media feeds been filling up with thankfulness over the past few days and weeks leading up to Thanksgiving? If these public statements of gratitude make you roll your eyes rather than count your blessings, never fear: we're not here to convince you to join a movement, or even start a journal or buy an app. However, focusing on the positive and remembering the ways in which you're lucky can be good for your career, if you go about things in a way that works for you.
  • Here Are the 6 Most Important Parts of Your Resume
    Recruiters spend about six seconds scanning through each resume they receive. Of course, this is assuming that your resume has the right keywords and has passed the test of the Applicant Tracking System (ATS), if the company you are applying to has one. So once the recruiter gets your resume, what is it that she looks at?
  • 9 Tips to Manage your Body Language at Interviews
    Whether you're going to your first job interview, you're out of practice, or you're generally nervous about interviews, make sure your body language doesn't give away your fear and apprehension. Stay aware of these general body language tips that can help you through your interview process.
  • How Long Will It Take You to Get a New Job?
    It's always nerve-wracking to contemplate making a leap to a new job. In today's market, however, where 770,000 American workers have been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer, it's especially scary to consider what could be an extended period of time out of work. Even if you're lucky enough to have a job, it's exhausting to think of pulling double-duty, as you surreptitiously interview around your regularly scheduled meetings. So how long can you expect to look, before you land something?
  • Do You Really Need a Cover Letter?
    For many job seekers, the worst part of the job application process is creating a cover letter. In this age of LinkedIn and online applications, it might seem like this part of the traditional procedure is out-of-date and unnecessary. So do you have to write a cover letter? The answer, as expected is, "It depends." More specifically, it depends on how you are applying for a role.
  • 3 Ways to Spot a Work-From-Home Scam
    Who wouldn't want to work from home, possibly in their pajamas, rather than deal with the stress of a commute and the inflexibility of a normal corporate schedule? Unfortunately, scammers know this, and create opportunities that are anything but. If you're interested in telecommuting full-time, but aren't lucky enough to have an employer who would consider a WFH arrangement, it pays to know how to spot the fakes and frauds among the genuine job listings.
  • Non-Compete Agreements: What You Need to Know
    You're excited about your new offer. It's with a good company and in your field of interest. You just need to sign a few documents here, a few contract forms there, and you're ready for a new beginning. But there's this one other document, a non-compete agreement, which you stumble upon just as you're getting ready to turn in all your forms. What does it mean if you sign, and what can you do to protect yourself?