• What to Do When You Are Stuck in a Career Rut
    There could be several reasons you feel you're stuck at a dead-end job – your career is not going anywhere, you no longer feel motivated to do your job, you don't feel this is the field you want to be in, you've reached a career ceiling and so on. If you're struggling to make a decision about your next step, here are some tips that can help.
  • 6 Tips to Climb the Corporate Ladder
    Want to be the boss someday? In addition to gaining experience and building skill sets, you'll need to take on new responsibilities and rise to the level of your next job. While ambition is key, there is more to proving that you are ready for the next level, if you want to make it big in the corporate world.
  • Women, Here Are 4 Ways to Stop Giving Away Power
    We're taught from a young age that "femininity" is synonymous with being demure, quiet, pleasing, and friendly. But bosses often need a kind of take-charge attitude that maintains your powerful role as a knowledgeable person. So how do you keep the power and your upward mobility as a woman in the workplace? How do you avoid being stuck between a rock and the glass ceiling? Here are some tips:
  • 5 Pieces of Career Advice from /r/CSCareerQuestions
    If you're on Reddit and you're a techie, you might already know about the popular subreddit, CS Career Questions. If you're not familiar, it might be worth it to stop by this community of 55,000 readers and check out what these pros have to say about careers and degrees in the computer science field. Here's some of the best recent advice from the experts.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Kill the Vocal Fry, Get the Job You Deserve?
    There's plenty of debate about whether or not vocal fry, that Kardashian-esque speaking affectation, is bad for you, professionally. Some experts claim that talking like a reality TV star will permanently cripple your career, while others note that even high-level financial executives now embrace the professional equivalent of baby talk. Regardless, having more awareness of and control over your public image is always a good thing. This week's roundup covers how to manage vocal fry, plus networking without feeling phony, and staying productive during the lazy days of summer.
  • Queen Bee Syndrome Is Not a Thing
    Women, amirite? When they're not weeping or scheming, they're tearing each other down at work. Or, at least, that's how the theory goes. It's called Queen Bee Syndrome, and it's occupied a place in workplace lore for as long as women have been represented in the labor force. There's just one problem. A recent study shows that it's probably not true.
  • Horrible Table Manners Might Be Ruining Your Career
    Bad table manners are like any lapse in etiquette – when the problem is coming from someone else, it's immediately apparent, but if you're the offender, you probably don't even realize it's an issue. (This explains such mysteries as why there are still people who belch in public or trim their nails on public transit.) If you are an unseemly eater, you could be damaging your career and not even know it.
  • Survey: Would You Wear Sweatpants to Work?
    Want to make your parents (or grandparents) roll their eyes all the way back into their heads at your next family gathering? Tell them that it's now OK – at a few companies, at least – to wear sweatpants to the office.
  • 6 Tips for Looking Like Management Material
    Hollywood would like us to believe that everyone goes to school, works hard, and quickly winds up in their dream job. From pauper to Wall Street, shy guy to leading man, or mailroom clerk to CEO, it's all about that fairytale ending. Now brush the popcorn from your lap and let your eyes readjust to the light, because the movie's over and we're heading back to reality.
  • Is It Better to Stand Out at Work, or to Hide?
    So, you've got a job. You can breathe a sigh of relief. And, for some workers, just having a job is enough. You're hearing all that great news about the uptick in the economic projections, employment is up, and the job market in general looks more hopeful. But, here's the thing: Just because you have a job doesn't mean you shouldn't be consciously making an effort to improve yourself and your position. The question is, how to do that without sticking your neck out and courting disaster.
  • 4 Things You Must Do After Your Annual Performance Review
    Your annual performance review is over. Hopefully, you have some new goals to work on and a few pats on the back to keep you motivated. Now what?
  • 21 Pieces of Career Advice We'd Give Our Younger Selves
    If you could go back in time and give your younger self career advice, what's the one thing you'd say? For some, it would be to negotiate a higher salary or start investing more heavily in a 401k. Others might go all the way back to college and follow their dreams -- or pick a career with a better occupational outlook, and fund their personal projects that way.
  • Fake These 5 Characteristics, and Seem More Confident
    When you feel confident, the people you interact with in your career are more likely to reward you with the things you want, whether it's a job or a promotion or a raise or a parking space closer to the front door. This is potentially pretty unfair, of course, since anyone who's worked with other humans for more than a day knows that confidence isn't always an indicator of competence. So what can you do, if you're deserving, but underappreciated -- and not burdened with an excess of self-regard? Game the system, and fake it until you make it.
  • Here's What Workers Cared About in 2014: 10 Most Popular Posts
    Humans are fascinated by the worst-case scenario -- the blown job interview, the botched salary negotiation, the bad college choice. It's not always schadenfreude, either. By analyzing the bad things that could happen, it's easier to prepare and avoid them. This year, PayScale's most popular posts were the ones that helped readers dodge disaster.
  • How Long Should You Stay at Your Job?
    Over a quarter of Millennials think that workers should stay in a role for less than a year before moving on, according to data collected from PayScale's employee survey, and compiled in the report Gen Y on the Job. Only 13 percent of respondents in the same age group thought employees should stay at a job for more than five years. That's a big shift from earlier generations, and sign that job hopping might be gaining in popularity -- at least among workers themselves. Given that companies pay to train and hire workers, however, and hiring managers probably don't want to see a checked employment history, how do you determine the perfect tenure?
  • 3 Insights for Millennial Workers, From Anne Krook
    There's plenty of handwringing when it comes to the fate of younger workers, but precious little in the way of actual advice on the way to build a career in a tough economic environment. For PayScale's latest data package, Gen Y on the Job, we sat down with Anne Krook, author of "Now What Do I Say?": Practical Workplace Advice for Younger Women, to get actionable insight into how Millennials can make the most of their strengths.
  • 3 Ways to Get Ready for Your Year-End Review
    Ninety percent of companies do annual reviews, according to the Society for Human Resource Management, despite the fact that at least 60 percent of workers -- including managers -- dislike the review process. Many organizations compound the problem by having their evaluations at the tail-end of the year, when workers are feeling their least productive and focused. Of course, if your company does things this way, it's unlikely that you'll talk them out of it, no matter how solid your arguments are for change. The best you can do, as a worker, is to prepare.
  • 3 Reasons to Show Gratitude in Your Career (Even When You'd Rather Skip It)
    Have your social media feeds been filling up with thankfulness over the past few days and weeks leading up to Thanksgiving? If these public statements of gratitude make you roll your eyes rather than count your blessings, never fear: we're not here to convince you to join a movement, or even start a journal or buy an app. However, focusing on the positive and remembering the ways in which you're lucky can be good for your career, if you go about things in a way that works for you.
  • Portrait of a Worker as a Young Man (or Woman)
    What's the average Gen Y worker look like? Understanding that dealing in generalities is always risky when it comes to any demographic, there are a few outstanding skills that Millennials tend to possess. PayScale's Gen Y on the Job data package reveals just a few of the greatest things young workers have to offer.
  • The Benefits of Training Others at the Office
    One of the best, tried-and-true ways to excel at what you do is explain it to someone else. Oftentimes, we go through our jobs -- which can include detailed systems and processes -- without realizing what we are actually doing. If you are years or decades deep into your career, much of your expertise may be "all in your head" -- and you may not even realize there’s a better way to do something, opening up the opportunity to excel more and even advance higher up the ladder.

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