• /r/careers: How Do I Even Start Looking Into Another Job?

    Today on Reddit, user /u/ArtistCook is debating whether or not to leave the culinary industry. He goes on to explain: "Debating on leaving the culinary industry because I keep looking at the job choices and I’m not sure if I want to take any of them. My question is, how do I even start looking into another career? Because I believe I can do any other career I set my mind to, just not sure how to start looking. What should I think about when looking into careers? What questions should I be asking myself/others?"

  • 6 Questions to Ask Before You Join a Startup
    Working at a startup is often quite an attractive proposition – the coolness factor, the chance to work on new projects with new people, the rush and all the excitement that comes with it. But before you take the plunge, make sure you have the answers to these questions at the very least.
  • Why People Quit Their Dream Jobs
    With an insanely competitive interview process that can take four to six weeks, include up to eight rounds of interviews, and require responses to seemingly irrelevant questions such as, "How many trees are there in Washington state?," jobs at Amazon and other top tech employers are hard to get. The thought of someone who actually managed to snag a coveted spot with a dream company voluntarily choosing to relinquish said position might sound unfathomable. And yet many people do exactly that.
  • Jobs to Thrill Your Inner Child: Professional Mattress Jumper
    Using the bedroom mattress as a springboard to the stars is a quintessential childhood pastime. So much so, that the classic nursery song Five Little Monkeys has over 68 million hits on YouTube). As a career path for adults, however, mattress jumping "is not a game," according to Reuben Reynoso, a professional "mattress filler" who has made a career out of jumping on high-end mattresses for McRoskey Mattress Company in San Francisco's Potrero Hill. 
  • Don't Forget About Apprenticeships: Learn While You Earn
    While not everyone wants to work, because most people have to, it logically follows that most of us want a job. The real question is, what's the best way to get one? If you can't afford four years of college, but want a skilled job that pays more than minimum wage, an apprenticeship might be for you.
  • How Your Brain Can Help (or Hurt) Your Career
    The brain is arguably the most definitively valuable tool to which we have access. If our lives and careers are a ship whose charter is based on a sequence of certain decisions, the brain is the captain steering its course. But how well do we you know it? Probably not very, according to some experts – and an interesting (free) quiz.
  • Career Change Late in Life Is a Good Thing, Says Study
    Growing older might be scary for most people, but it's a great thing when it comes to your career success. A new study shows that a vast majority of professionals who change careers later in life are happier and earn more money in their new occupations. Here's what you need to know about making the switch in your career as a seasoned professional.
  • PayScale's Best Jobs: This Quiz Will Tell You Which Job Is Right for You
    Ask any career counselor: working in the wrong field is like trying to write with your less-dominant hand. Maybe you can struggle along, but you're never going to excel – and worst of all, it's uncomfortable. That's why the goal when picking a career isn't to choose the highest-paying job or even the job with the best occupational outlook. To really do well in your chosen field, you need to pick a job that fits your personality, skills, aptitudes, and interests. PayScale's latest data package helps you determine just that, starting with an interactive quiz that helps you figure out which job is the best job for you.
  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Make Big Changes, Forget About Self-Sufficiency, and Stay on the Boss's Good Side
    New year, same old career? If you ever needed proof that January 1 is just a day on the calendar, the week after the holidays might provide it. But just because the beginning of a new year isn't automatically a new start at work, doesn't mean that you can't use the fresh page in your planner to inspire you to make changes, large and small, that can make 2015 the best year of your career so far.
  • Switching to a New Industry? It’s Time for a New Resume
    Whether you're switching careers out of necessity or simply the desire to make a change in your life, searching for a job takes on a new level of difficulty. Because you'll be competing with applicants who've been in the industry for years, you have to try extra hard to show hiring managers that you're the best candidate for the job -- and not just an inexperienced newbie. How do you do that? Your resume is your not-so-secret weapon. Here's how to use it to your best advantage.
  • 5 Gifts to Give Yourself (and Your Career!) in 2015
    Even if you don't observe any of the December holidays, personally, there's almost no way you've made it this far into the month unscathed by the gift-giving madness. Now that all of the bustling and spending has come to end, it's time to turn your attention inward, and ask yourself what you need and want in the next year, in order to get the career you deserve. Good news for your bank account: many of these "gifts" are free.
  • 5 Ways to Change Careers Without Starting From Scratch

    When we talk about career changes, we often speak in leaps, e.g. lawyers who become history teachers or executives who leave big business to start their own mom-and-pop shops. But what about the smaller career evolutions, the kind that don't require a lot of extra education or training to effect? Here's how to make a career change that's a lot easier and less frightening than jumping into a strange new occupation.

  • Avoid These 3 Career Change Mistakes

    Very few people end their working life in the same career they started off in, when they took their very first job out of school. The good news is that this means there's less social pressure to stay on a path that's no longer satisfying. The bad news, of course, is that change is never easy. Here's what to avoid, if you're thinking of making the leap.

  • 3 Career Lessons From Weird Al Yankovic

    It's Weird Al's world; the rest of us are just living in it. This week, his album Mandatory Fun hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts, #8days8videos blew up on Twitter, and everyone's co-workers and Facebook friends began posting links to Tacky and Word Crimes. Speaking of which, it became apparent that Weird Al's goal might not purely be to amuse us. It's clear that there's a lot to learn from the man who started his career with Dr. Demento as a mentor.

  • 40 Percent of American Workers Would Quit, If Not for Health Insurance

    On dark days, when your job gets you down, what stops you from handing in your letter of resignation? For 40 percent of workers, a recent study finds, it's health insurance -- specifically, health insurance that doesn't cost more or provide less than the plan they have through their employers.

  • 3 Tips for Building a Career With Meaning

    The process of putting together PayScale's data package, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs made one thing very clear: there are an infinite number of paths to a job that really satisfies, and no two careers will look exactly alike, even if the worker in each case loves his or her job.

  • 3 Ways to Get Out of a Career Rut

    Do you feel stuck in your job? Even if you're grateful to be gainfully employed, it's still hard to feel good about going off to work every day if you don't get the sense that you're moving forward. If you've been idling in one place for a while, here's how to kick your career back into gear.

  • The 5 Jobs That Ranked the Lowest for Job Meaning

    Low-meaning jobs aren't necessarily low-satisfaction jobs. Sometimes, they even pay a good salary and/or have minimal stress. PayScale's latest data package The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs looks at all the things that can measure a "good" job -- however you define that term for your own life and career.

  • The 7 Jobs That Offer the Highest Meaning

    You don't need to get fulfillment from your job: sometimes, a decent salary is enough. But if you know you're a person who can't be happy unless their days are spent doing something meaningful, these occupations might be a place to start your hunt for your next career.

  • 5 Jobs That Pay Well, But May Not Be Fulfilling

    Some jobs don’t offer warm fuzzies, but they do give you a fat paycheck. If having that comfortable income is a priority for you, and you can find meaning in other aspects of your life, then here are some careers you might want to consider.