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  • The 5 Worst States for Teachers
    Whether you're new to the profession, or a master veteran to the science/art, you probably know that teaching is a very difficult job. The curriculum, rules and regulations, and "best practices" are ever-changing so you can never get too comfortable. The money isn't great – to say the least. Not to mention that, on any given day, the work itself is seemingly endless, very difficult, and largely underappreciated (and/or misunderstood) by society at large.
  • 'Silicon Valley' Illustrates Why Salary Transparency Is So Important
    HBO's hit comedy, Silicon Valley, always features pitch-perfect parodies of the tech industry, but this week's episode, The Lady, focused on a topic near and dear to PayScale's heart: salary transparency. This most recent episode not only entertains, but illustrates what happens when employees don't know why their employer pays the way it does.
  • 7 Reasons You Must Take a Vacation, Even If You 'Can't'
    Many people find it difficult, if not impossible, to take the vacation time that is coming to them and get away from the office for a while. There are always a million reasons why "taking a vacation is impossible right now." Work is too busy, you have a presentation/meeting/client on the horizon that you can't miss, etc. Some folks even proudly proclaim, "Oh, I never use my vacation time," as if that's a good thing. But, in a lot of ways, it's not. Maybe this list of reasons that you simply must take a vacation, even though you "really can't right now" will help to convince you.
  • Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is: Women and Money Talks
    A new study finds that women are more likely to discuss medical issues and other taboo topics with others than talk about money matters. We’ll examine the reasons why women are so tight-lipped about talking dollars and cents, despite their keen financial habits.
  • The 10 Most (and 10 Least) Profitable Undergraduate College Degrees
    Of course, you could make your millions after earning your bachelor's degree in English or art history, but if high earning potential is your post-graduation goal, you'll want to target your educational plans accordingly. (Hint: think STEM.)
  • State Legislators Attempt to Shut Down Paid Sick Leave for Pennsylvania Workers
    In December of 2014, a task force in Philadelphia that was formed to study the issue of the benefits and pitfalls of paid sick leave came to its conclusion: Paid sick leave is necessary. Now, two Pennsylvania state senators are announcing their intent to propose legislation to preemptively prohibit mandatory paid sick leave for employees. Two steps forward, three steps back.
  • Unemployment Is Down, So Where Are the Wages?
    If you've been waiting for a fatter paycheck to find you in 2015, so far the news has been discouraging. Unemployment rates are down, which is exciting news, but we still haven't seen an improvement in wages. Here's why a lower unemployment rate hasn't translated to higher pay -- yet.
  • Obama Pushes Paid Leave for Americans
    Yesterday, President Obama signed a memorandum directing federal agencies to give employees up to six weeks of paid leave after the birth or adoption of a child -- that's a "benefit he wants to extend to all American workers" with the Healthy Families Act, according to The New York Times. It's also long overdue. While the Family and Medical Leave Act provides for 12 weeks of unpaid leave, that magical "paid leave" is discretionary.
  • #FairPayMatters: What the World Needs to Learn From the Sony vs Charlize Theron Fiasco
    If anything good came out of the Sony email hack, it's that Charlize Theron put Sony on blast for paying her $10 million less than her male co-star, Chris Hemsworth, for their upcoming film, The Huntsman. Let’s take a look at how Theron’s ballsy move (pun very much intended) is encouraging women to quit the coy act and fight for their right to earn equal pay in their careers.
  • At Work, It's Better to be a Father Than a Mother
    While working mothers struggle with decreased pay and lack of status in a workplace that sees them as unreliable, working fathers enjoy improved status, pay, and benefits that help a growing family survive.
  • Would You Take a Lower Salary for a Bigger 401(k) Match?
    More than four out of 10 employees (43 percent) say that they would take a lower salary if they were offered a bigger employer contribution to their 401(k) retirement plan, according to a new Fidelity Investments study. Perhaps even more surprisingly, only 13 percent said they'd take a six-figure salary with no 401(k) match from their employer.
  • Should the US Abolish Tipping?
    The tipping debate rages on. The restaurant industry in the United States relies upon customers tipping for good service in order to pay waiters and waitresses their wages. Servers try to give fast and friendly service in order to be rewarded with additional monies. But does it work?
  • America Still Lags Behind the World in Maternity Leave
    According to the World Policy Forum, the United States of America, Suriname, and Papua New Guinea have something in common: they are the only nations that do not require employers to provide paid maternity leave.
  • 3 Massive Companies That Are Incredibly Good To Their Employees
    We may think of large companies as being less personal to work for. When corporate headquarters are in another state, or you never meet the people in charge of making policy, you may feel like just another gear in the machine. These three giant companies, however, have not forgotten how vital the workers are and treat them well.
  • Big Surprise: Raising the Minimum Wage Is Good for the Economy
    Opponents of raising the minimum wage continue to scream that paying working class people higher wages will destroy the economy and the American way of capitalistic freedom will end. We have hard evidence that this is simply not true.
  • Conservatives Want YOU to Go Without Healthcare
    The Affordable Care Act is now law, and in spite of the various technical glitches, Americans have been signing up, so that they may enjoy access to healthcare when they get sick. For some people, this may be the first time they have ever had health insurance. Now, there is a push from conservatives to change the definition of the full-time work week to get employers who do not want to offer benefits off the hook.
  • Pentagon Food Service Workers Allege Illegal Retaliation for Strike Against Contractor Employer
    Recently, The Huffington Post reported that food service workers in the Pentagon filed a complaint against their private-sector employer. They say that they were illegally retaliated against in response to asserting their right to protest for better working conditions.
  • The Sometimes Surprising Truth About the Value of the Minimum Wage

    The real value of the minimum wage is going down. Ten different charts on two different websites paint the same picture of how the relative value of the minimum wage has declined over time. In short, when you take inflation and cost of living data into account, minimum-wage workers can buy less for their earnings than they could a few years ago.

  • Are Prevailing Wage Laws Discriminatory?
    If you work as a contractor on projects with federal funding, prevailing wage laws may be pertinent to your rate of pay. An opinion piece published in the Albuqurque Journal makes the argument that "prevailing wage" laws are discriminatory. Understand what these laws say and how they affect you.
  • Who Wants to Raise the Minimum Wage? The Answer May Surprise You
    Is raising the federal minimum wage rate beneficial to the economy or not? We'll take a look at who's for and against raising the wage and how level of education affects people's opinions.