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  • 4 Things Educators Should Know About Teacher Shortages
    Education is a field that's ever-changing, as most teachers are no doubt aware. You have to be mighty flexible to be a teacher, rolling with the punches of curriculum changes, priority shifts, and societal/cultural evolutions that make your job feel brand-new each every year. (Sometimes, each and every day.) So, what's new in 2015? Well, teacher shortages, for one thing. Let's take a look at a few points educators should be aware of about this school year's job market.
  • Report: Technology Is Creating Jobs, Not Eliminating Them
    A recent Deloitte study based on 140 years of England and Wales census data found that technology has produced more new jobs than made existing ones obsolete. This is particularly true of "caring" occupations that require cognitive thinking, such as nurses and teachers, as opposed to "muscle power" occupations, such as weavers and metal-makers, which are more easily replaced by machinery. In other words, as long as we have brains and do our best to maximize their potential, we may not need to be terrified that we will be replaced by robots. While it's important to keep in mind that the Deloitte economists' assessment is limited to the U.K. workforce and thus not necessarily indicative of larger global trends, the study's findings do paint an overall rosier picture of technology's impact on human-occupied occupations in comparison to other recent studies.
  • The First Women to Beat Ranger School
    It's impressive news. Two women – Capt. Kristen Griest and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver – overcame seemingly overwhelming odds to pass the Army's Ranger School, at Fort Benning, Georgia. It's a daunting feat for any soldier, but for female soldiers, it's also a milestone: until this year, they weren't even allowed to attempt the leadership course.
  • Women Over 65 Are Twice as Likely to Live in Poverty
    The gender wage gap is a persistent problem that's taking a long time to solve. The fact is that on average, women earn about 78 cents for each dollar brought in by men. And, new data suggest that this is having a significant effect on the state of women's finances in retirement.
  • Here's Why Millennials Want to Work Part-Time
    New studies show that millennials are choosing to stay out of Corporate America and opting for smaller companies that value employees and offer more flexibility. We'll take a look at why millennials prefer freedom and purpose (over money) in their careers, and figure out how the heck they're still able to afford pretty enviable lifestyles.
  • Netlix Offers 'Unlimited' Year of Paid Maternity and Paternity Leave
    The United States is one of only four countries in the world that doesn't guarantee any paid leave for new parents. Americans who work for the government or private companies with 50 or more employees are usually covered under the Family and Medical Leave Act, which allows 12 weeks of unpaid leave in a 12-month period – but when expenses are higher than ever before, families are often hard-pressed to use unpaid leave. As a result, employers in competitive niches like tech use paid parental leave as a way to woo in-demand talent, with giants like Google and Facebook often topping the list. On Tuesday, Netflix announced a paid parental leave policy that would make even the most pampered employees green with envy: unlimited time off, at full pay, after the birth or adoption of a child.
  • Can You Guess How Many Female CEOs There Are in the World?
    If you can't name the right number, don't worry: neither can executives. The 1,700 participants of a Weber Shandwick study guessed that 23 percent of CEOs at large companies were women. Take a look at the embarrassing results of the study and the shocking truth of how few female CEOs actually exist today.
  • What's Your Employer's Philosophy: Work to Live or Live to Work?
    In 2006, Treehouse CEO Ryan Carson decided to give employees of the Portland, Oregon-based technology education company three-day weekends every week, arguing that living to work instead of working to live is not the best (or at least only) key to a company's profitability and overall success. But, that doesn't mean that his decision was motivated solely by a desire to be a more humane boss. Employers making similar decisions are just as interested in the bottom line as they are in making workers' lives better. It turns out, working less sometimes means producing more – and better – work.
  • 10 Female STEM Stars Under 30
    Women make up only 24 percent of the STEM workforce in the US, according to the Department of Commerce, and some fields are worse than others. Women represent only 14 percent of the country's engineers, but make up 47 percent of mathematicians and statisticians, 47 percent of life scientists, and 63 percent of social scientists. But as these rising stars of the tech industry show, women are making an impact on STEM. Given the impressive laundry list of accomplishments already made by all of the women on our list at such a young age, it's safe to say that both they and their careers are something to watch.
  • Portland, Maine Accidentally Gives Tipped Workers a Raise
    Language matters, especially when it comes to legislation. Recently, we had proof of this when the Affordable Care Act nearly deflated thanks to an alternate interpretation of the phrase "established by the state." Now, city officials in Portland, Maine, find themselves in a similar bind: confusion over the language in a recent bill to raise the city's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour led city council to nearly double tipped workers' wages, from $3.75 to $6.35 an hour, as of January 1. The accidental raise was met with dismay from restaurant owners and delight from labor organizers. Both dismay and delight, however, might be short-lived.
  • Pope Francis on Work and Workers
    Pope Francis is doing quite a bit of traveling in the Americas during the next few months, and he'll be speaking on a variety of topics along the way. His popularity among both Catholics and non-Catholics in the U.S. is quite high, so the ideas he lays out tend to receive a good bit of coverage. Whatever your faith, it's interesting to consider the ideas the pope has been busy presenting these last few years, particularly his ideas on the topic of work and workers. He'll likely add to these discussions in the months to come. Let's take a closer look.
  • Incredible Company Perks: Top 3 Cash Rewards
    As PayScale has reported in the past, the crazy perks that employers sometimes offer to lure potential hires or satisfy existing ones can be unusual and/or extremely valuable. While it goes without saying that you'd be hard-pressed to find an employee willing to work without monetary compensation — it's called a "job" for a reason, after all — some companies have advanced the ever-escalating incentives competition even further by offering cash-based benefits on top of existing salaries or wages. From hiring bounties and quitting bonuses, a staff liquor fund, and even a budget to overcome your fears (seriously), here's a list of the top cash-based incentives that employers have implemented in order to stay competitive in attracting quality talent.
  • The Debt Project: A Photo Series Worth a Thousand Words
    We think of debt as a negative thing, and in many cases it is. But, not all debt is created equal. Some debt can even be productive. Student loan debt, for example, can still turn out to be a worthwhile investment in some cases. (Check out PayScale's College ROI Report for more specific information.) Owning a home and paying a mortgage builds equity.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Ngaio Bealum, Stand-Up Comic/Cannabis Activist/Pot-repreneur
    Sacramento-based standup comic and cannabis reform activist Ngaio Bealum began making waves in the pot industry over 20 years ago, through a combination of entertainment, activism, and pot-repreneurism. As the focus of our latest How I Got My Dream Job profile, Bealum took the time to sit down with PayScale to share insights from a career sprinkled with an illustrious list of occupational credits, including stand-up comic, columnist, movie star, musician, and juggler, to name only a handful. Or, as Bealum puts it more succinctly, "I get paid to smoke weed."
  • 4 Ways Finances Affect Women Differently Than Men in Their Careers
    It's a fact. Women are more likely to discuss health issues than financial matters, but the reason why isn't as obvious as you may think. Yes, women tend to be more open about personal stuff than men, but the reason they refrain from money talks is because they feel insecure about their "lack of financial knowledge and experience," and don't know "where to turn for guidance," says a recent study. Let's take a look at four factors that contribute to the financial insecurities that are unique to women in their careers.
  • Oregon State Legislature Passes a Bill Offering Free Community College to Residents
    Last winter, President Obama began discussing his plan for keeping America (and Americans) educated and competitive in an ever-expanding global economy. In light of the high cost of tuition, his idea to offer two years of community college for free was exciting to many, but others were concerned about how the federal government could afford such a program.
  • Ellen Pao's Reddit Resignation Reveals the Enduring Sexism of Tech
    Picture this: a new CEO makes a series of controversial changes to the company's hiring process, policies, and product. Eventually, a popular staffer is fired, and the community revolts, starting a Change.org petition, a hashtag campaign on social media, and even sending death threats. Sound surreal? It might be – if the CEO were male. As former Reddit CEO Ellen Pao's resignation demonstrates, it's not at all a strange set of circumstances for a woman in charge.
  • Why the Lower Unemployment Rate Is Bad News
    The unemployment rate has declined to 5.3 percent this month, but no one's planning a parade to celebrate. If you've been keeping up with news on the economy, that might sound crazy. After all, this is the lowest unemployment rate since April 2008, when the recession was first taking hold. Why aren't we cheering in the streets?
  • For-Profit Colleges Must Prove That Students Can Pay Back Loans
    A recent US district court ruling reaffirms that the US Department of Education has a right to require colleges to prove that graduates earn enough money to pay back their student loans in order to be eligible for federal student aid dollars. This ruling is the second in a push-back via gainful employment regulations to hold these schools accountable for a return on students' tuition investment. Here's what you need to know.
  • 3 Career Lessons From the US Women's World Cup Victory
    What does a soccer game have to do with your career? If the soccer game in question is last night's World Cup clincher and you're a working woman, a lot. Most of us probably won't experience what it's like to be a world-class athlete fighting for dominance on a global playing field, but even if you're not a sports fan of any stripe, you can learn a lot from the US women's national soccer team.