• 13 Incredible Company Perks
    From fledgling tech start-ups to household-name corporations, employers both big and small are continuously upping the ante when it comes to finding ways to keep their workers happy. While unusually cool perks like Etsy's playground-esque open lofts, or simply invaluable incentives such as the unlimited vacation days offered at Gravity Payments (that's right -- unlimited) might not be the deciding factor in someone's decision to accept a job, they can certainly be a factor. Smart employers know this, and make a point to incorporate additional takeaways into a job offer (besides the opportunity of employment itself). From onsite "Kegerators" to employer-subsidized egg freezing for female employees (seriously), here's a rundown of some of the most interesting perks* currently satisfying employees and enticing potential hires.
  • Working Moms Are Still Getting the Short End of the Stick
    Let's face the facts: being a working mother is exhausting and, oftentimes, completely defeating. Many women put their own career and life aspirations on hold to raise children, but very few of these ladies actually speak openly about the endless struggles they face on a daily basis. Here are the facts that you should know about the realities of working mothers and what you can do to help.
  • #SOTU 2015: Middle-Class Economics and Expanding Opportunity
    "The shadow of crisis has passed," said President Obama, in last night's State of the Union address. "And the state of the union is strong." While receiving standing ovations for job numbers (and getting in an ad-libbed dig at Republicans about winning the presidency), Obama outlined a vision for the country that focused on middle-class growth.
  • State Legislators Attempt to Shut Down Paid Sick Leave for Pennsylvania Workers
    In December of 2014, a task force in Philadelphia that was formed to study the issue of the benefits and pitfalls of paid sick leave came to its conclusion: Paid sick leave is necessary. Now, two Pennsylvania state senators are announcing their intent to propose legislation to preemptively prohibit mandatory paid sick leave for employees. Two steps forward, three steps back.
  • Unemployment Is Down, So Where Are the Wages?
    If you've been waiting for a fatter paycheck to find you in 2015, so far the news has been discouraging. Unemployment rates are down, which is exciting news, but we still haven't seen an improvement in wages. Here's why a lower unemployment rate hasn't translated to higher pay -- yet.
  • Man Gets Fired for Not Coming to Work for 24 Years
    Do you ever feel like nobody at work is paying attention to what you do, to the extent that you could stop showing up for work, and maybe no one would notice? A. K. Verma, a civil servant in India, did not show up for work for 24 years. Then, he got fired.
  • The Rise of the 'Uni-Moon' and the Decline of Work-Life Balance
    When married couples cannot even take their honeymoon together because they are unable to coordinate time off from work, something needs to change. This rather disturbing new trend is called a "uni-moon," and it is not helpful to work-life balance.
  • #FairPayMatters: What the World Needs to Learn From the Sony vs Charlize Theron Fiasco
    If anything good came out of the Sony email hack, it's that Charlize Theron put Sony on blast for paying her $10 million less than her male co-star, Chris Hemsworth, for their upcoming film, The Huntsman. Let’s take a look at how Theron’s ballsy move (pun very much intended) is encouraging women to quit the coy act and fight for their right to earn equal pay in their careers.
  • How Our Professional Lives Will Change in 2015
    As you prepare to make 2015 an excellent year, you might want to think about how the workplace is changing. Of course, it's not like a switch flips on January 1, neatly dividing the corporate trends of 2014 from 2015. But the first month of the year is still a good time to think about how work is evolving, right before our very eyes -- and what we can do to make our careers truly satisfying between now and next New Year's Eve.
  • What We Know So Far About Obama's Plan for Free Community College
    Yesterday, President Obama unveiled his plan to offer eligible college students two years of community college for free. More information about the America's College Promise proposal will be revealed today, alongside an American Technical Training Fund proposal, which would expand technical training programs that meet employer's needs and prepare more Americans for higher paying jobs. Here's what we know about the plan right now.
  • 3 Endangered Jobs for 2015
    Out with the old, and in with the new! While some industries are thriving in 2015, and anticipating further growth, other professions are struggling to stay relevant. Growth in the tech industry, for example, has been easy to understand and anticipate. But, other industries are paying a price for the changes technology has brought.
  • Want to Get More Done at Work? Do Less
    Some good news for anyone sick of 12-hour days at the office: the key to maximizing professional productivity may not be to work more, but rather to work less. According to a recent study conducted by the Draugiem Group, a social networking company, the average person remains productive for 52 minutes at a time. Using its productivity tracking app, DeskTime, the Draugiem Group analyzed users' time and tasks and found that the most productive 10 percent were those who worked for 52-minute intervals followed by 17-minute breaks, over the course of a workday that often lasted fewer than eight hours.
  • State Supreme Court Hands Down $188M Judgment Against Wal-Mart
    Hot on the heels of the recent Supreme Court decision against Amazon workers, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court just upheld the 2007 judgment for $188 million against Wal-Mart Stores, in Braun v. Wal-Mart Stores. The class action suit affects 187,000 workers, who worked for the company between 1998 to 2006, and centers around Michelle Braun and other Wal-Mart employees, who claimed that they were not compensated for working off-the-clock, as well as through meals and breaks.
  • Gaming, Craft Beer, and Cannabis Cultivation – 3 New Fields of Study for College Students
    Our economy is changing. The idea that many of the jobs that will be available 10 years from now don't exist today, is more true now than it has ever been. But, it's not just the tech industry that's moving our culture along. Many new professions await today's students, and universities are always trying to anticipate, and prepare for, these future opportunities. In response to the growth of some surprising industries, colleges are offering more and more outside-the-box fields of study that might be a little more than tempting to today's students. Come to think of it, many of yesterday's college students might have enjoyed them as well....
  • Congress Considers Drastic Cuts to Pension Plans
    For the first time ever, Congress may move to cut pension benefits to current retirees. Proposed legislation, which would take the form of an amendment to a $1.1 trillion spending bill, would cut benefits for multiemployer plans, common in the grocery, trucking, and construction industries, and often managed jointly by employers and unions.
  • To Spare Retail Workers, Some Shoppers - and Companies - Boycott Black Thursday
    For better or worse, Black Friday, the informal commercial holiday that follows the national holiday of Thanksgiving Day, has been a widely accepted fact of life for retail workers, and shoppers, for decades now. However, in the last few years, an effort by brick-and-mortar stores to compete with online retailers has led to earlier and earlier kickoffs to the official start of the holiday shopping season. Many stores now open their doors on Thanksgiving Day. This practice, along with other demands placed on retail workers by their employers during the holiday season, has serious consequences for these employees, and many are saying that enough is enough.
  • Obamacare Enrollment: What You Need to Know
    Last year, Obamacare, formally called the Affordable Care Act, helped 10 million Americans sign up for health insurance. Being insured is now a requirement, so it's important to be sure your coverage is all set for 2015. If your employer provides your insurance, nothing has changed and no action is required on your part. Just keep doing what you have been doing. But, if your employer doesn't offer health insurance, (or if you're a freelancer, or currently between jobs,) enrollment is a great option to get the coverage you need.
  • Even Red States Recognize That the Minimum Wage Is Too Low
    America's federal minimum wage is $7.25 -- not enough to pay rent in many states. The debate over whether to raise the minimum rages on, but voters in some states -- and not just blue ones -- are taking matters into their own hands.
  • Voters Approve Minimum Wage Increases in 2014 Midterm Election
    President Obama sparked fierce debate when he proposed raising the national minimum wage to $10.10 last year; the current national rate is $7.25. At the polls yesterday, voters expressed their strong support of this initiative, even as they cast votes for GOP candidates in the Senate and the House.
  • Is Capping Student Loans at $10K a Good Idea?
    Recently, billionaire investor Mark Cuban declared that fixing the student debt crisis is the most important thing our government can do to restore the national economy. His idea: cap federal student loans at $10,000 per student, per year. Few would argue that student loan debt isn’t a problem of epic proportions, but Cuban’s explanation of the crisis and his solution resulted in mixed reactions.