• Detroit Teachers Return to School Today Following Sickout
    The right to public education might not be explicitly guaranteed under the Constitution, but equal access is covered under the 14th Amendment. What does this mean, in reality? Sometimes, not much. The quality of public education varies a lot from school district to district and even from school to school. Our schools do not deliver on the promise of public education – and therefore equal opportunity – for all students. Take, for instance, the persistent problems in the Detroit public school system, which this week inspired teachers to launch a sickout after the district announced it would run out of money to pay them in June.
  • French Office Worker Takes Former Employer to Court for Boring Him at Work
    Some people don't know how lucky they have it. Take, for example, the case of Frédéric Desnard, the former manager who's bringing his ex-employer, Interparfums, before an employment tribunal, claiming "bore out" – similar to burnout, "but less interesting," as The Guardian puts it. Terminated by the perfume company a year and a half ago, Desnard is now asking for over $400,000 in damages.
  • The 5 Worst States for Teachers
    Whether you're new to the profession, or a master veteran to the science/art, you probably know that teaching is a very difficult job. The curriculum, rules and regulations, and "best practices" are ever-changing so you can never get too comfortable. The money isn't great – to say the least. Not to mention that, on any given day, the work itself is seemingly endless, very difficult, and largely underappreciated (and/or misunderstood) by society at large.
  • The 5 Best States for Teachers
    Teaching is difficult work. However, some factors (such as compensation and teacher/student ratio) can make a big difference. Every year, WalletHub examines all 50 states plus the District of Columbia using 13 metrics in order to determine the best and worst states for teachers.
  • 3 Reasons Why It's Tough to Teach in West Virginia (and These Other States)
    There are a lot of wonderful things about being a teacher, but it's a really difficult job, too. It's a profession that's immensely rewarding and immeasurably challenging all at once, each and every day. It's a job that's always changing – new students, new culture, new curriculum. The pay is relatively low, when measured against what other comparably trained professionals earn, and the hours are very long. (Yes, even when you consider the summer, despite what you might have heard.)
  • Now It's Personal: Check Out This Gender Pay Gap Calculator
    The gender pay gap is not an abstract idea. It is, in fact, a real problem. However, it's hard to know exactly how the wage gap has played out for each of us as individuals, which makes the reality (and the gravity) of the situation harder to fully grasp.
  • For Perspective's Sake, Here Are 4 Jobs That Pay Better Than Teaching
    Despite all of the evidence to the contrary, there are still folks out there who think that teachers are fairly well paid. The truth is, they aren't. At least not when compared with other professionals who receive equivalent education and training. Despite the extremely important nature of the work, teachers often need to take on second or even third jobs to make ends meet, which impacts both their students' learning and their own experience within the profession. So, for the sake of gaining some valuable perspective, let's take a look at a few workers that are paid better than teachers.
  • 6 Jobs in the Legal Marijuana Industry You Never Knew Existed
    The legal marijuana industry in the U.S. has expanded quite a bit in recent years. Medical marijuana is now available in more than 20 states, and several have even legalized it for recreational use. An entirely new cluster of jobs have become available alongside this growth, and because the industry is so new, workers may or may not be familiar with all of their options. Jobs in the legal marijuana industry extend beyond growers and dispensary workers. Here are a few other new and less well-known job titles within the field.
  • How Our Sleep Affects Our Work (and Vice-Versa)
    Trying to get a good night's sleep can sometimes be more difficult than it seems like it should be. First of all, although we all know that sleep is essential for maintaining our physical and mental health, a lot of us treat it like it's somewhat optional nonetheless. When life, or work-life, gets busy, it's all too easy to use some of the hours we usually devote to sleep to catch up on "critical" tasks instead. Then, when we finally do get to sleep, the quality of that sleep can also be affected by thoughts about work and the office. Let's face it, our sleep affects our work and our job affects our sleep. It's also important to keep in mind that lack of quality and quantity rest could have real and lasting consequences for you, both in and out of the workplace.
  • Here's Why CEO Pay Matters
    The Great Recession hit the U.S. economy pretty darn hard, and American workers are still recovering. We've learned, in recent years, that an improving economy doesn't necessarily mean better pay for workers. However, despite these challenging economic trends, top executives continue to earn huge sums of money, especially compared with how much their employees make and when measured against how much people in their position used to earn in decades past. Let's take a look at a few facts about CEO pay and also examine why it really does matter, quite a lot actually, to you and your employer.
  • When the Cost of Living Skyrockets, Teachers Can't Live Where They Work
    You might think that teachers have a pretty good deal, getting the summer off and 12 months of pay to boot, but teachers' compensation is pretty low, especially when it's compared with other professions that require similar levels of education and training. Other public servants, like police officers and firefighters, also opt into a career that, despite its importance, leaves something to be desired in the salary department. But, shouldn't teachers and all public servants who work tirelessly and selflessly to better communities be able to afford to live in the area where they work? Here are a few things to think about.
  • Unplug From Social Media, Get Productivity-Enhancing Zzzs
    We're learning more and more about the importance of a getting enough sleep. The quality and quantity of our sleep has an impact on our health, our relationships, mood, memory, the clarity of our thinking ... the list goes on and on. So, if you aim to take good (or even decent) care of yourself, sleep is something that really should be a priority.
  • The 5 Hardest Working Cities in America
    Americans work hard. Actually, we work more than anyone else in the industrialized world, we're terrible about taking our vacation time, and we retire later too. But, some parts of the country are a little extra into hard work. In order to determine the hardest working cities in America for 2016, WalletHub analyzed the 116 largest cities in the country along six metrics. Let's take a look at their top five.
  • What You're Twice as Likely to Do When You Telecommute
    Telecommuting is on the rise. As the number of folks who work from home increases, new data begin to emerge about their experience. If you're considering telecommuting at some point in the future, the results of a recent survey should be of interest to you.
  • Why Don't Americans Believe That Robots Are Coming for Their Jobs?
    The concept of robot overlords taking control of mankind dates back long before Will Smith's 2004 magnum opus I, ROBOT, which is, incidentally, now the name of one of those automatic floor vacuums. In fact, stories of computers ruling humanity date back as early as the 1950s (as commenters who know their Asimov will no doubt point out). But these days, it really isn't science fiction. In fact, Wired reported a study by Oxford University researchers that estimated 47 percent of current jobs in the U.S. could very well be automated inside of the next 20 to 30 years. The scary part is that Americans actually agree for the most part with these findings — they're just in denial that they are the ones on the chopping block.
  • New CareerBuilder Survey Reveals What HR Managers Know About the Gender Pay Gap
    The gender pay gap is a complex issue. In order to begin to understand the situation, it's important to appreciate the difference between what PayScale is calling the controlled and the uncontrolled gender pay gap. Not only do women earn less than men for equal work, they also do different jobs in the first place. The truth about the gender pay gap is that it's much more complicated than some people think.
  • Teachers in South Dakota Will Finally Get a Raise
    Teaching is hard work, but despite the education, dedication, and expertise it demands, teachers are startlingly underpaid compared with other professionals with similar education and training. That's true across the board. However, teachers' pay varies widely state-to-state. This year, South Dakota has decided to take action in order to move their teachers up the pay ranks and help their schools and students succeed. Let's take a closer look at how they'll do it, and what encouraged them toward this action.
  • Sabbaticals Are Good for Workers and Employers
    If you're like most Americans, three things are probably true for you. First, you desperately need a break from your job. You're tired and stressed, and feeling rundown and overworked is typical for you. Second, despite this, you haven't taken a vacation in a while. And, it's not necessarily because you're not entitled – you might have unused vacation days. In that case, you feel that you can't, or shouldn't, get away from the office. You worry that it could hurt business, your individual performance, or even your career standing or trajectory. And finally, if you're like most American workers, you haven't even dared to dream about taking a sabbatical. But, maybe you should. You, and your employer, would be wise to take it under serious consideration. Here's what you need to know.
  • Want Job Security? Avoid These 3 Jobs
    The job market as a whole is showing some good signs of recovery from the Great Recession. But, that recovery hasn't looked the same across the board. It has varied widely by region, for example. Similarly, industries are progressing (or regressing) at different rates. If you're contemplating changing careers – or just want to know whether your current occupation offers a good future – it pays to know which jobs have the highest unemployment rates.
  • The Yelp Open Letter Makes Me Glad Social Media Arrived After I No Longer Knew Everything
    In 2000, I worked for a startup. The name doesn't matter – like most startups, it didn't make it. The important thing, for the purposes of our story, is that I was a recent grad, awe-inspiringly entitled, fairly poor, and perhaps not very good at my job yet. The only thing I had going for me was that there was no social media, so there was no way for me to ruin my reputation with more than, say, three people. In this, I was much more fortunate than Talia Jane, the recently terminated Yelp/Eat24 employee. Jane's open letter to her CEO, which she published on Medium a few days ago, ignited the kind of internet firestorm that's generally reserved these days for arguing about Bernie Bros or Donald Trump. The question, of course, is what to make of her letter and its aftermath. Is she an entitled whippersnapper who doesn't know how to sacrifice, or a voice of her generation pointing out systemic unfairness ... and getting punished for it?

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