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  • How Hollywood's A-List Actresses Fight for Women's Equality
    Who better to bring awareness to a vital cause like women's equality than Hollywood stars? We'll take a look at how some of Hollywood's most revered actresses are speaking out about the inequality women face on- and off-screen, and the role the media plays in perpetuating this unconscious bias.
  • Want to Be a Success? Choose a Partner With This Trait
    It's so important to find a partner who understands and appreciates your career goals and supports you throughout the ebbs and flows of the journey. A recent study found that if your significant other possesses this one trait, then your chances of doing well at work are greatly increased. Read on to see if your spouse possesses that special something that may be the key to your career success.
  • The High Cost of College Is Leaving Many Students Out in the Cold
    College should be one of the most memorable times in a person's life, not a time of financial stress, anxiety, and hopelessness. However, with the rising cost of attending college and student loan debt more than quadrupling over the past two decades, obtaining a degree is proving to be a strain, especially for students who are financially burdened. One group of low-income students from Columbia University is using social media to shed light on the dismal realities of being a poor student in one of the most prestigious and expensive Ivy League schools in the nation, with a Facebook page entitled Columbia University Class Confessions.
  • The 4 Hardest Jobs to Keep
    Although the unemployment rate (and maybe the economy in general) is improving, the change has been slow and somewhat inconsistent. The unemployment rate is different depending on the region or city in question, and varies quite dramatically by race, gender, and age, as well.
  • Hilarious Responses to College Rejection Letters
    For most of us, spring is a happy time; March and April are months signifying the promise of barbecues, blooming flowers, and beach weather. But for the high school seniors around the country racing to their mailboxes every day after school to check for acceptance or rejection letters from their dream schools, March and April are months that will impact the rest of their lives.
  • 3 Things Millennials Want, 3 Things They Could Do Without
    Born between 1980 and 2000, Millennials are the largest generation group in US history, comprising roughly 75.3 million of the nation's population and surpassing even the Baby Boomer generation. Needless to say, it's important to understand how this crowd thinks and functions, seeing the tremendous impact they have on the workplace and how it will evolve in the very near future. Here's a list of three things Millennials want in their lives, and three things they could simply do without … for now.
  • Widespread Marijuana Legalization Changes Workplace Policies and Practices
    The last few years have been marked by rapid changes in terms of marijuana legalization across the country. Medical marijuana is now authorized in 23 states and Washington DC, and four states have legalized recreational use: Colorado, Washington state, Alaska, and Oregon — and it seems as though Ohio might be next in line to join them. But what do these new laws mean for the workplace?
  • 5 Reasons Why STEM Has a Woman Problem
    How is it that science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) companies can find solutions for some of the world's most complex problems, but they can't seem to solve the gender bias issue that keeps women out of STEM careers? According to new research, it's because we, as a culture, don't know that there's even a problem – it's unconscious, and we're all to blame.
  • Employee Monitoring: Justifiable Security Measure or Overly Orwellian?
    Remember that time you worked yourself into a hypochondriac frenzy, and wound up spending the whole afternoon at the office surfing WebMD and trying to figure out if people get cholera anymore? As it turns out, Bill the IT guy — or even your CEO — may have been assessing your risks at the same time in a very different way for very different reasons.
  • Working Dads Who Spend More Time With Their Kids Are Happier
    Hey, working dads. Yeah, you! Do you want greater job satisfaction, a happier household, less bickering with your wife, and praise from your co-workers? Seem too good to be true? Well, a couple of new studies show that you actually can have your cake and eat it, too – you just have to spend more time with the kiddos. Read on to see what we mean.
  • NYU Student Starts Petition to Combat Rising Tuition
    Nia Mirza is a future college student who should be happy, proud, and excited to be accepted into New York University's (NYU) freshman class in the fall. Instead, she is reeling from the most recent tuition hike that will cost Mirza and her family $71,000 for just her first year. In exasperation, she started a petition on Change.org to pressure NYU to roll back the increase.
  • Laid Off? This App Aims to Help You Beat Depression
    Social media has an amazing ability to connect people; however, with that comes both good and bad. The bad part is that anyone and everyone has the freedom to voice whatever opinion their little hearts desire, which promotes cyber bullying and allows other negativity to spread online. The good part is, the convenience and connectivity of social networks allow like-minded people to communicate, share, and help one another. One psychologist and MIT grad student, Robert Morris, used the positive aspects of social networking to formulate a site incorporating crowdsourced cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help users "debug" their negative thoughts and overcome depression.
  • Sarah Thomas Earns Her Stripes as the NFL's First Female Referee
    There's a new face calling the shots for the National Football League and her name is Sarah Thomas – oh, and she just so happens to be the first female full-time referee in the history of the NFL. Read on to learn more about how Thomas began her professional journey and what fans think of her new, history-making promotion.
  • Highest Unemployment Rates by City
    To sum up the current unemployment status with just one number would be unfair. (Although, if we did, it would be 5.5 percent. Things are definitely looking up!) But unemployment data can't be boiled down quite that easily. Unemployment may be the lowest it's been in quite some time, overall, but the rate varies so widely that one number alone can't tell the tale. States and regions experience different economic realities, and the unemployment rate varies greatly by ethnicity as well.
  • Minority-Serving Community Colleges Receive Less Funding
    Inequality is perpetuated in sneaky, hidden, ways. We've moved past some of the more obvious forms of oppression -- at least, on a good day -- but more subtle practices and policies continue to have a big impact.
  • 5 New Career Paths That Didn't Exist 10 Years Ago
    The workplace is changing, thanks to new technologies and new ways of thinking about work. If you're looking to venture into semi-uncharted territory in hopes of a brighter career trajectory, then you may want to consider one of these five new careers.
  • What's Happening to Casual Friday?
    Ah, the much beloved workplace tradition of casual Friday. Who doesn't love the opportunity to take a break from the painful shoes and the stuffy suits -- or even the boring business casual? Getting a day off from driving up that dry cleaning bill, and having the option to wear jeans and sneakers, is pretty great stuff as far as most people are concerned. But, are casual Fridays changing right before our eyes?
  • After 'Religious Freedom' Becomes Law in Indiana, Businesses Vote With Their Dollars
    On Thursday, Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, effectively allowing businesses to refuse to serve gay customers. In the days since, some companies have responded by restricting or terminating their investments in Indiana.
  • A Shortage of Substitute Teachers Causes Big Problems for Schools
    Sometimes, making progress in one area leads to new problems in another. The improved unemployment rate may be causing some difficult adjustments for schools, for example, as subs move toward full-time employment in greater numbers.
  • A Woman on the 20 By 2020
    Times change, and our understanding of the past changes right along with it. A great many things were different, say, 100 years ago, in America. For starters, women couldn't vote. In fact, the oppression -- marginalization is way too weak a word -- of women and minority groups was so abundant 100 years ago that there is hardly a comparison between their experience then and now. So, it makes sense that we see certain things a little differently today that we did in the past.