• Just What Does a 6-Figure Salary Get You?
    Once the definition of success, earning $100,000 or more per year doesn't automatically mean you've made it to easy street these days. As kids in the '80s (or earlier), we might have thought that amount was akin to a million dollars, but now, a six-figure income doesn't mean as much as it used to. What happened? Inflation, for one.
  • Report: Student Jobs Should Build Careers After Graduation
    The financial reality facing today's college students is pretty different than it was decades ago. First of all, the cost of higher education has skyrocketed. The price of attending a private, nonprofit, four-year college, for example, has more than tripled since 1975. And, while the image of the full-time, parent-supported college student who starts working only after completing her degree was never the only reality for students, today's learners must deal with the fact that they can't even hope to work their way through school. Worst of all, perhaps: the student jobs they're likely to find won't boost their careers after graduation.
  • The Cities With the Lowest Unemployment Rates
    A variety of factors contribute to our understanding regarding the current state of the economy. It's not a simple issue. One indicator stands out though as especially significant, at least as far as many working Americans are concerned: unemployment rates. And, this fall, it seems we've been getting some good news.
  • Fact Check: Do Welders Really Make More Than Philosophers?
    If you watched Tuesday's GOP debate on Fox Business, you undoubtedly heard Neil Cavuto tell you that things were really, definitely interesting. And they were: each candidate had ample time to lay out broad details of their economic agenda, and an opportunity to show why theirs was superior to the others. Many times, however, the most interesting thing that was said wasn't a policy issue, but instead anecdotal claims left unchecked by the moderators. In particular, Marco Rubio had some interesting things to say about vocational training.
  • The 5 Best Cities for Veterans
    Veterans make up about 7.5 percent of the workforce in the U.S., and have an unemployment rate of 3.9 percent, according to last month's report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics – more than a full percentage point lower than the 5 percent unemployment rate for the country as a whole. In fact, last month's data reflects a seven-year low for veterans' unemployment. But not all U.S. cities are created equal, when it comes to employment opportunities and quality of life for veterans.
  • Stay-at-Home Moms Are on the Rise, But Not Always By Choice
    Families have a lot of tough decisions to make, when it comes to finances. One of the trickiest can be whether or not one parent ought to stay home while the kids are young. There are many pieces to this complicated puzzle, but a recent report shows that one single factor is pretty influential – the cost of child care versus the price of rent. Let's take a closer look.
  • Obama Bans the Box

    Obama Bans the Box
    Reforming the criminal justice system has been a surprising talking point for both parties as we inch closer to the 2016 elections. Members from either side of the aisle agree that our prisons are overpopulated (accounting for almost 25 percent of the world's incarcerated population) and there's a need to reduce the number of inmates, but what happens once the formerly incarcerated are reintegrated into society? President Obama has detailed a plan that may begin to answer some of those questions, starting with the job hunt.
  • The Gender Pay Gap Begins as Early as Age 5
    The gender wage gap is narrowing, but it persists. In 1963, women earned just 59 cents for every dollar earned by men. Today, the pay gap is smaller – 74 cents on the dollar, or 97 cents when we control for factors like occupation, experience, and skills, per PayScale's report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap. Over the course of a lifetime, this has a big impact, not just on women but on their families.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 271,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5 Percent
    The Employment Situation Summary for October far surpassed economists' predictions, showing the addition of 271,000 jobs to public and private payrolls. Prior to this morning's release from the labor department, economists polled by Reuters forecasted gains of 180,000 jobs. The unemployment rate was "essentially unchanged" at 5 percent.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 182,000 Jobs in October
    This morning's ADP National Employment Report showed the addition of 182,000 jobs to private payrolls last month, almost exactly as economists predicted. (Those polled by Reuters were looking for gains of 180,000 jobs.) However, last month's report was revised downward to 190,000 jobs from 200,000 jobs, and job creation has averaged 184,000 per month over the past three months. A year ago, gains averaged 263,000 for the same three-month period. Is job growth slowing?
  • Don't Believe the Hype: Most College Graduates Feel Their Degrees Were Worth the Cost
    Alarmingly high rates of student loan debt have a lot of people wondering if a bachelor's degree is really worth its cost. Short answer: yes, as long as you pick the right college and the right degree. Sure, college is extremely expensive these days, but don't let that scare you away. Despite everything, there is still a tremendous amount of evidence to support the importance, and the benefits, of attaining a bachelor's. In most cases, it's still totally worth it. Here's why.
  • How Important Is Cost of Living When Considering Relocation for a Job?
    If you're pondering relocation to a new city for a job opportunity, you're probably hoping to make more money. But, determining how far your salary will go in your new town can be kind of tricky. We all know that cost of living is a factor to evaluate when considering a job offer, but is it more important than salary? Here are a few things you should know.
  • The 3 Most and Least Recession-Recovered Cities
    Since the Great Recession, cities have been struggling to recover their housing markets, job opportunities, and economies overall. The recovery has been spotty – in some cities and states more than in others.
  • Nontraditional College Students Are the New Normal
    The landscape of higher education is changing. Online learning options, the high cost of tuition, fading tenure programs for professors – today's college experience looks very different than the one students encountered 15 or 20 years ago. But, maybe some of these changes were designed to address what might be the biggest change of all: the change in the students themselves. Let's take a closer look at today's college students in an attempt to get a better sense of how their circumstances and objectives have shifted in recent years.
  • If the Economy Is Improving, Why Don't We Have More Money?
    We all know that the Great Recession took a huge toll on Americans' finances. There's little debate about that. But, the recovery is proving to be more contentious. For an example, look no further than this morning's disappointing jobs report from the labor department. Let's take a look at what's going on with the U.S. economy and how it relates to your own financial bottom line.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 142,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Steady at 5.1 Percent
    For the second month in a row, the Employment Situation Summary came in under analysts' expectations. Prior to this morning's report from the labor department, economists polled by Reuters had predicted gains of 203,000 jobs in September. In addition, the Bureau of Labor Statistics revised last month's numbers downward to reflect 136,000 jobs added for August, instead of the 173,000 originally reported.
  • ADP Report: Private Sector Added 200,000 Jobs in September
    Prior to this morning's release of the ADP National Employment Report, economists predicted the addition of 194,000 jobs to private payrolls during the previous month. The actual number, 200,000 jobs, came in above expectations and August's disappointing 190,000 jobs added.
  • Should We Ban Tipping?

    Should We Ban Tipping?
    Few debates have become as contentious as this one. Ask any server, and they'll more likely than not want to smack you. Ask the patron who just tacked an extra $20 onto their dinner tab after a nice evening out, and they'll probably breathe out a desperate, "Oh, please!" With $15 cocktails and far-less-than-minimum-wage hourly rates, it's easy to sympathize with both sides. But it's more complicated than just tip or no tip.
  • What Everyone Needs to Know About the Seattle Teachers Strike
    This morning, Tuesday, September 15, parents and students across Seattle woke up to the news that there would be no school again today. The teachers in the city are on strike, with huge consequences for families and kids, and for the teachers themselves. But, this strike isn't just about Seattle – it's about the state of the educational system in America, and it's about the way teachers are valued and treated. Here's what you need to know.
  • Is the Ideal Vacation Even Possible for US Workers?
    Did you take a vacation this summer? Do you wish you could've taken more time off? As fall draws near, so do the feelings, for many, of slight remorse caused by a summer spent mostly indoors, most often at work.

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