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  • Programs That Promise Jobs for Grads Remind Us That a Degree Isn't a Guarantee
    Much of the next election will be centered around which candidate can provide the best path for new jobs and a growing economy. Some candidates have promised 4 percent growth every year. Others say the answer lies in massive government spending on infrastructure repair. Now, a group of U.S. companies has decided not to wait for the next president: they call themselves the 100K Opportunities Initiative.
  • Does the Boss's Gender Change How Men Negotiate Salary?
    Salary negotiation is important. The salary you command at the start of a new job impacts your pay for the remainder of your time with the company, and possibly beyond. Over time, not negotiating can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost pay. Furthermore, people who ask for raises earn more than those who don't. We know that women are less likely to negotiate than men, but gender can also impact negotiation from the other side of the table. Recent research suggests that men negotiate differently when their boss is a woman.
  • More Summer Jobs for Teens, But Do They Want Them?
    The impact of the Great Recession was far-reaching. Although the economy has started to improve in recent years, things aren't the way they used to be. This is true for teens as well as adults. The teen labor force is a complicated matter, with a lot of different factors contributing to the current summer employment reality. Let's take a closer look at a few facts pertaining to summer jobs for teens in 2015.
  • Pope Francis on Work and Workers
    Pope Francis is doing quite a bit of traveling in the Americas during the next few months, and he'll be speaking on a variety of topics along the way. His popularity among both Catholics and non-Catholics in the U.S. is quite high, so the ideas he lays out tend to receive a good bit of coverage. Whatever your faith, it's interesting to consider the ideas the pope has been busy presenting these last few years, particularly his ideas on the topic of work and workers. He'll likely add to these discussions in the months to come. Let's take a closer look.
  • Bored or Broke in Retirement? These Part-Time Jobs Might Be for You
    A few weeks ago, I wrote about how retirees have more education debt than ever. For some, the simple solution is to pay down what you can with your monthly allowance and leave the rest to liquid assets. But for the more determined folk who've left the workforce, coming up with more money after retirement might mean going back to work — at least, part-time.
  • The Debt Project: A Photo Series Worth a Thousand Words
    We think of debt as a negative thing, and in many cases it is. But, not all debt is created equal. Some debt can even be productive. Student loan debt, for example, can still turn out to be a worthwhile investment in some cases. (Check out PayScale's College ROI Report for more specific information.) Owning a home and paying a mortgage builds equity.
  • 4 Ways Finances Affect Women Differently Than Men in Their Careers
    It's a fact. Women are more likely to discuss health issues than financial matters, but the reason why isn't as obvious as you may think. Yes, women tend to be more open about personal stuff than men, but the reason they refrain from money talks is because they feel insecure about their "lack of financial knowledge and experience," and don't know "where to turn for guidance," says a recent study. Let's take a look at four factors that contribute to the financial insecurities that are unique to women in their careers.
  • Jeb Bush: Just Work More, OK?
    Presidential candidate Jeb Bush said that to fix the economy, Americans need to work longer hours. Unsurprisingly, the statement was met with consternation, laughter, and disbelief by some. Hot on the heels, as it is, of the news that wages are stagnant and some out-of-work Americans have simply given up on finding a job, it should also make us all irate.
  • Why the Lower Unemployment Rate Is Bad News
    The unemployment rate has declined to 5.3 percent this month, but no one's planning a parade to celebrate. If you've been keeping up with news on the economy, that might sound crazy. After all, this is the lowest unemployment rate since April 2008, when the recession was first taking hold. Why aren't we cheering in the streets?
  • Want a Raise? Have Some Wellness Perks, Instead
    Most of us would prefer a bigger paycheck to a couple of sessions with a lifestyle coach or some free yoga classes. After all, given enough of a raise, you could probably spring for that unlimited card, all by yourself. But given that it's cheaper to sponsor a fitness competition than it is to give everyone at the company a 3 percent pay increase – and that healthier employees equals lower healthcare costs for the employer – you can probably expect to see a lot more emphasis on wellness in years to come.
  • Stop Overworking Everyone : A Better Way to End the Gender Wage Gap?
    Women still earn less money than men, in part, because they're more likely to seek out flexible schedules that allow them to combine work and household responsibilities. But, that doesn't mean that men are necessarily psyched to burn the midnight oil – at least, not every midnight. Perhaps the best way to tackle the gender wage gap and the work-life balance problem is to examine why our culture of work demands such round-the-clock devotion from everyone, both male and female.
  • The PayScale Index, Updated: Wages Down for Q2, STEM Salaries Slowing
    The latest update to The PayScale Index, which measures the change in pay for all employed US workers, showed an overall decline in wages of -0.5 percent for the second quarter. This was greater than PayScale's prediction of a -0.1 percent decline. Annual wage growth was +0.3 percent. But not every metro area and industry took an equal hit. STEM-focused jobs, for example, once again saw an even bigger wage slowdown in Q2, despite constant news about growth in tech companies.
  • For-Profit Colleges Must Prove That Students Can Pay Back Loans
    A recent US district court ruling reaffirms that the US Department of Education has a right to require colleges to prove that graduates earn enough money to pay back their student loans in order to be eligible for federal student aid dollars. This ruling is the second in a push-back via gainful employment regulations to hold these schools accountable for a return on students' tuition investment. Here's what you need to know.
  • Study Finds Burnout Is the New Normal
    It doesn't take a bevy of research studies to tell us that Americans are working harder than ever. But, how we are processing and managing the stressful pace of our lives deserves a closer look.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 223,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5.3 Percent
    Job growth slowed slightly last month, and the labor force shrank by 432,000 workers, offsetting similarly sized gains in May, according to this morning's Employment Situation Summary. In addition, the Bureau of Labor Statistics revised April and May's reports downward by 60,000 jobs.
  • Bernie Sanders Is Right: We Need a Vacation
    Sen. Bernie Sanders is drawing impressive crowds as he launches his campaign for president of the United States. His focus on income inequality, removing big money from politics, and environmental issues must be striking a nerve. Also probably appealing to the average American? His take on vacations – which is basically that we need them, and that they should be paid.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 237,000 Jobs in June
    Private payrolls added 237,000 jobs last month, according to The ADP National Employment Report, the most in six months.
  • Obama Will Expand Overtime to 40 Percent of Salaried American Workers
    Yesterday, President Obama announced a rule change that will expand time-and-half eligibility to around 5 million Americans. By raising the overtime threshold from $23,660 a year to $50,440, the president will grant overtime to workers who were previously ineligible for overtime pay, despite earning low wages and working more than 40 hours a week.
  • Liberal Arts Proponents Fight Back Against the Haters
    The number of graduates majoring in the humanities and social sciences in the U.S. has declined in recent years, and liberal arts institutions are making a concerted effort to change the perception that humanities and social science degrees cannot lead to profitable careers.
  • Spotlight on Disney-Layoff Debacle
    It feels a bit like deja vu. Didn't we just hear all that hubbub about Disney laying off workers? It was a sordid tale that involved 250 workers laid off from "the happiest place" on Earth, and then asked to train their replacements (who were an apparent part of an outsourcing directive via H-1B visas). Disney's debacle was only one of the most publicized incidents of such layoffs, and that bad PR may just have made a difference. After all, Disney just canceled similar plans to lay off more than 30 IT workers earlier this month.