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  • Bernie Sanders Proposes Free Tuition, But Can It Work?
    You've probably already heard about Sen. Bernie Sanders' free-college tuition bill, which that promises a tuition-free education, so students can attend state colleges or universities with little cost. It sounds like a great idea, right? We'd no longer be able to complain about all the uneducated masses. Every student would have access to training to land them a career they'd love, without the burden of crushing student loan debt. Employers would have access to a more highly skilled pool of applicants. Eventually, even the economy as a whole could improve. So why isn't everyone on board?
  • New App Helps to Keep Your Online Image Clean
    Despite partying hard all throughout college, you somehow managed to graduate with decent grades and now you're on your way to paving a successful career path. Your partying days may be behind you now, but that doesn't mean they won't come back to haunt you when you least expect it – for instance, when you're trying to land your dream job. A simple Google search is all it takes for recruiters to dig up every humiliating photo that you've ever been tagged in on Facebook. Well, now a new app aims to prevent your past from ruining your chances of a brighter future.
  • Rise Above the Bottom Line: The Benefits of a Liberal Education
    There's more to life than money. These days, it can be hard to remember that. A lot of people focus on the bottom line – their compensation – when it comes to work. But, if you've ever been miserable at a high-paying job, you know that a big salary isn't always worth the cost. When it comes to education, the same principle applies. There's more to be gained from college than simply training for a high-paying job.
  • The Secret to Getting Into a Great College? Hint: It's Who You Know
    Most prospective students have heard rumors about the effects on favoritism on college acceptance. Now, a new study that surveyed just over 400 admissions officers from the nation's top colleges appears to bolster those accusations, apparently showing that getting into a top-tier college has less to do with academics, and a whole lot more to do with who you know.
  • McMaster University Is Giving Female Employees a $3,515 Raise to Correct for the Gender Wage Gap
    A great deal of research has surfaced lately showing that the gender wage gap remains a persistent problem. But, few organizations are making an effort to identify the extent of the issue in their own business, and make adjustments.
  • 4 Do's and 4 Don'ts for Take Our Children to Work Day
    Take Our Children to Work Day is Thursday, April 23rd, and if you still need convincing that this 20-year-old holiday is worth observing, there are a lot of great reasons to consider. Whether you run a small business, work in an office, or work from home, your children could learn a lot from spending the day with you at work. Here are some do's and don'ts to help you maximize the potential of the day.
  • How to Observe Take Our Children to Work Day When You Work from Home
    Working from home comes with its rewards and its challenges. Having more flexibility and control over your life and schedule is a pretty nice perk, but many work-from-home folks find that they miss the camaraderie and socialization of office life – at least, from time to time.
  • The High Cost of College Is Leaving Many Students Out in the Cold
    College should be one of the most memorable times in a person's life, not a time of financial stress, anxiety, and hopelessness. However, with the rising cost of attending college and student loan debt more than quadrupling over the past two decades, obtaining a degree is proving to be a strain, especially for students who are financially burdened. One group of low-income students from Columbia University is using social media to shed light on the dismal realities of being a poor student in one of the most prestigious and expensive Ivy League schools in the nation, with a Facebook page entitled Columbia University Class Confessions.
  • Hilarious Responses to College Rejection Letters
    For most of us, spring is a happy time; March and April are months signifying the promise of barbecues, blooming flowers, and beach weather. But for the high school seniors around the country racing to their mailboxes every day after school to check for acceptance or rejection letters from their dream schools, March and April are months that will impact the rest of their lives.
  • 5 Reasons Why STEM Has a Woman Problem
    How is it that science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) companies can find solutions for some of the world's most complex problems, but they can't seem to solve the gender bias issue that keeps women out of STEM careers? According to new research, it's because we, as a culture, don't know that there's even a problem – it's unconscious, and we're all to blame.
  • NYU Student Starts Petition to Combat Rising Tuition
    Nia Mirza is a future college student who should be happy, proud, and excited to be accepted into New York University's (NYU) freshman class in the fall. Instead, she is reeling from the most recent tuition hike that will cost Mirza and her family $71,000 for just her first year. In exasperation, she started a petition on Change.org to pressure NYU to roll back the increase.
  • 6 Great Reasons to Bring Your Kids to Work With You
    Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day is April 23rd and with summer vacation fast approaching as well, now might be a great time to start making plans. Or, since April break is well underway for a lot of kids, maybe now is the right time to bring your littles to work with you! Assuming your company is open to it, here are a few really great reasons to consider making the visit happen.
  • Laid Off? This App Aims to Help You Beat Depression
    Social media has an amazing ability to connect people; however, with that comes both good and bad. The bad part is that anyone and everyone has the freedom to voice whatever opinion their little hearts desire, which promotes cyber bullying and allows other negativity to spread online. The good part is, the convenience and connectivity of social networks allow like-minded people to communicate, share, and help one another. One psychologist and MIT grad student, Robert Morris, used the positive aspects of social networking to formulate a site incorporating crowdsourced cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help users "debug" their negative thoughts and overcome depression.
  • Rich Kids Graduate From College, Poor Kids Don't
    Getting a college education increases a person's income earning potential. In 2013, Americans whose households made over $108,650 in 2012 were more than eight times more likely to have graduated from a bachelor’s-degree program than Americans whose households made less than $34,160. Go back to 1970, and the higher-income group was five times more likely to have earned a bachelor's degree. The trend indicates that a college education has become more and more important to financial health and success. The problem is that the high cost of education makes finishing a bachelor's degree much harder for the nation's poorest students.
  • Minority-Serving Community Colleges Receive Less Funding
    Inequality is perpetuated in sneaky, hidden, ways. We've moved past some of the more obvious forms of oppression -- at least, on a good day -- but more subtle practices and policies continue to have a big impact.
  • Odd Jobs: 5 Obscure Careers You May Want to Consider
    "So, what do you do for a living?" Nine times out of ten, this question is asked out of habit or courtesy. Very seldom do people expect an unusual answer. However, imagine what a nice change of pace it would be to hear someone respond with, "I dive for pearls in remote locations around the world" or "I design Barbie clothes." Here are five obscure careers that will definitely leave people wanting to know more.
  • A Shortage of Substitute Teachers Causes Big Problems for Schools
    Sometimes, making progress in one area leads to new problems in another. The improved unemployment rate may be causing some difficult adjustments for schools, for example, as subs move toward full-time employment in greater numbers.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! I Tried to Negotiate, and the Employer Pulled the Offer
    When you're evaluating a job offer, it's almost always smart to ask for more money. After all, if you don't ask, most of the time, you won't get. That said, occasionally you'll run into hiring managers who choose to see even a perfectly reasonable request as a personal affront. This week's roundup includes expert advice on dealing with that situation, plus tips on how to build your personal brand and avoid the pitfalls of crafting a college essay.
  • Why Job Shadowing Is the Key to a Successful Career
    Wouldn't you like to "test-drive" a career before committing to it, much like you do when buying a car? In case you didn't know, you absolutely can and it's called job shadowing. We'll take a look at what job shadowing is, whom it's for, and why it's the bee's knees when it comes to choosing a promising career.
  • College ROI Report: Where to Go to School If You Love to Party (or Want to Do Anything But)
    If you're in the process of choosing a college, you're probably neck-deep in facts and figures. While it's essential to consider the data when making your choice, if you ignore everything but earning potential and graduation rates, you might wind up picking a school that looks great on paper, but is the worst possible place for you, the individual, to build your academic career. The best school for you is the one that takes all your needs into account, including career path, choice of major, and preferred campus culture. With this in mind, PayScale's College ROI report offers lists of the best schools for sports fans, liberal arts majors, future businesspeople, and much more. For example, if you're interested in a party school or need a place that keeps it clean, the following schools might be for you.