• Report: Student Jobs Should Build Careers After Graduation
    The financial reality facing today's college students is pretty different than it was decades ago. First of all, the cost of higher education has skyrocketed. The price of attending a private, nonprofit, four-year college, for example, has more than tripled since 1975. And, while the image of the full-time, parent-supported college student who starts working only after completing her degree was never the only reality for students, today's learners must deal with the fact that they can't even hope to work their way through school. Worst of all, perhaps: the student jobs they're likely to find won't boost their careers after graduation.
  • 5 Free Online Courses to Boost Your Career
    One of the most frustrating things a professional will face in their career is feeling stuck. There comes a point when the competition is steep in your field and the only way to get a leg up is to tack another skill or certification onto your resume. The only problem is: how do you find the time? Read on to learn more about free online courses that can boost your career in little to no time at all.
  • For the First Time Ever, Computer Science Is the Most Popular Major for Women at Stanford
    There's no reason to beat around the bush or sugarcoat it: STEM has a woman problem and it has for a while now. However, here's a bit of good news: Stanford University recently announced that, for the first time in the university's history, computer science is the top major for female students this year. Yeah, you read that right.
  • Don't Believe the Hype: Most College Graduates Feel Their Degrees Were Worth the Cost
    Alarmingly high rates of student loan debt have a lot of people wondering if a bachelor's degree is really worth its cost. Short answer: yes, as long as you pick the right college and the right degree. Sure, college is extremely expensive these days, but don't let that scare you away. Despite everything, there is still a tremendous amount of evidence to support the importance, and the benefits, of attaining a bachelor's. In most cases, it's still totally worth it. Here's why.
  • Obama Proposes a Cap on Standardized Testing
    The debate over standardized testing has been raging for years. The argument escalated in intensity following the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002, which, in addition to other related requirements, mandated yearly testing of every student in all 50 states. Since then, teachers, parents, and students have weighed in with their ideas about whether these tests truly improve the educational system in the U.S. or if they do more harm than good.
  • 3 Reasons Why It's Tough to Teach in West Virginia (and These Other States)
    There are a lot of wonderful things about being a teacher, but it's a really difficult job, too. It's a profession that's immensely rewarding and immeasurably challenging all at once, each and every day. It's a job that's always changing – new students, new culture, new curriculum. The pay is relatively low, when measured against what other comparably trained professionals earn, and the hours are very long. (Yes, even when you consider the summer, despite what you might have heard.)
  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Offers Employees 52 Weeks Paid Parental Leave
    Who says extended parental leave is just for tech companies like Netflix or Microsoft? The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation recently announced a new parental leave policy of 52 paid weeks for mothers or fathers during the first year after the birth or adoption of a child, plus unlimited time off for all employees.
  • Nontraditional College Students Are the New Normal
    The landscape of higher education is changing. Online learning options, the high cost of tuition, fading tenure programs for professors – today's college experience looks very different than the one students encountered 15 or 20 years ago. But, maybe some of these changes were designed to address what might be the biggest change of all: the change in the students themselves. Let's take a closer look at today's college students in an attempt to get a better sense of how their circumstances and objectives have shifted in recent years.
  • Why One College Professor Quit His Dream Job
    Oliver Lee, an attorney and assistant professor of history, recently wrote an op-ed for Vox about his decision to leave his tenure-track job in higher education. He did not point the finger at his former employer, the students, or the professors for the problems that led to his resignation. Instead, he says the trouble is systemic, and he calls for reform. Let's take a closer look at some of the issues.
  • What Teachers Say About College and Career Readiness
    EdSource, in partnership with the California Teachers Association (CTA), conducted an online survey to find out what teachers feel is the key to career and college readiness and success. The results spoke volumes about what we ought to be providing our next generation of workers, according to the people on the front lines, and about what these students are learning instead. Let's take a closer look.
  • What Everyone Needs to Know About the Seattle Teachers Strike
    This morning, Tuesday, September 15, parents and students across Seattle woke up to the news that there would be no school again today. The teachers in the city are on strike, with huge consequences for families and kids, and for the teachers themselves. But, this strike isn't just about Seattle – it's about the state of the educational system in America, and it's about the way teachers are valued and treated. Here's what you need to know.
  • Here's Why You Have Impostor Syndrome (Even Though You Shouldn't)
    Do you feel like a fake? If so, you might be suffering from impostor syndrome, the feeling of intellectual or professional fraudulence that manifests as severe self-doubt. Even when all evidence indicates that they are competent, someone experiencing impostor syndrome can't shake the feeling that they don't know what they're doing professionally, and that soon enough someone is going to find out that they're faking their way through their job and they'll be fired.
  • 4 Things Educators Should Know About Teacher Shortages
    Education is a field that's ever-changing, as most teachers are no doubt aware. You have to be mighty flexible to be a teacher, rolling with the punches of curriculum changes, priority shifts, and societal/cultural evolutions that make your job feel brand-new each every year. (Sometimes, each and every day.) So, what's new in 2015? Well, teacher shortages, for one thing. Let's take a look at a few points educators should be aware of about this school year's job market.
  • Why I Chose to Study English
    If I had a dime for all the times someone questioned why I decided to study English, I'd probably have enough money to put me through law school. Jokes aside, I honestly can see where the confusion lies. My high school academic record reads like it belongs to a poster child pre-med student: 12 advanced placement courses including two years of calculus, an introductory statistics course, advanced biology, and physics. On top of all that, I attended one of the best STEM high schools in the nation, which, not incidentally, is also home to the best high school computer science program in the world.
  • Cool at 13, Not at 23: Why Popular Kids Aren't Necessarily Successful Adults
    Ever notice that the cool kids from high school seem to still be stuck there? They like to spend a lot of time talking about the good old days, and it's clear that these years were the highlight of their lives thus far. Well, there might be a good reason for that, and it's good news for workers who weren't exactly captain of the football team years ago.
  • 6 Fun College Majors That Might Start You on a Serious Career
    For students, the end of August means an end to school vacation and the beginning of a brand new year. Some are excited, and others ... not quite so much. For many college students, the end of August also brings thoughts of picking a major. It's a big decision. These days though, you have many exciting options to choose from. Here are six you might never think of – but should.
  • Why Do We Rank Schools? Vote for PayScale at SXSW, and Find Out
    How does South by Southwest pick its panels? By asking the internet to choose which of its most burning questions deserves an answer first. This year, PayScale has three potential sessions up for your approval: The Rankers on College Rankings: Why We Do It; How To Diversify Tech & Hack Our Unconscious Bias; and How Working in a Social Agency Made Me Hate Social. Use the SXSW PanelPicker, and tell organizers what you need to know.
  • The 10 Best Colleges in America
    What makes a school great? Every publication that ranks colleges and universities has its own methodology, usually a combination of test scores prior to entering school and starting salary after graduation. Business Insider, which debuted its seventh annual ranking this week, uses SAT scores per College Board, median starting salary for grads according to PayScale, and feedback from a survey of over 1,000 readers. Their list might not contain many surprises, but it does provide insight into what makes a top school in 2015.
  • The 10 Worst States for Student Loan Debt
    The class of 2015 is the most indebted to date, with student loan debt adding up to almost $68 billion total, including federal and private loans. The average graduate will have to pay back $35,000, according to data analysis by Edvisors, and the student loan default rate hovers around 13 to 14 percent. While politicians debate the best way to combat student loan debt, or mitigate its crippling effects, individual students must decide the best way to minimize their debt load. A recent WalletHub report reminds us that where students live can be an important factor in determining how much money they owe – and how quickly they're able to pay it off.
  • Key & Peele Asks, 'What If We Worshipped Teachers Like We Do Pro Athletes?'
    Imagine a world in which teachers are hired via a draft broadcast live from Radio City Music Hall, do commercials for major brands, and scoop up contracts worth tens of millions of dollars. Or, you know, just watch Key & Peele's latest sketch, TeachingCenter, which does it for you.

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