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  • Goucher College: Goodbye SAT, Hello YouTube

    College applications are a dreaded beast: prepping for, taking, and retaking the SAT or ACT, writing the clever and eloquent essay describing your 18 years on the planet thus far, begging teachers to write letters of recommendation, and then fretting over the final GPA on your transcripts. Now, imagine if all of that process was simply eliminated and instead of jumping through hoops, you made a video. No tests, no essays, no letters, no transcripts. That’s what one college is attempting to do.

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  • Comedian John Oliver Skewers For-Profit Colleges

    Sunday’s Last Week Tonight delivered a 16 minute tongue lashing directed at for-profit colleges and their role in the student debt crisis. The schools have been at the center of a congressional investigation and have been called into question by the media and the public for their recruiting tactics and student loan practices. Host John Oliver didn’t hold back in his recap of the situation.

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  • American-Sized Student Loan Debt for Australians?

    Australians have found themselves in the middle of a debate not unlike the ongoing dispute in the U.S. over the cost of higher education. This year, the Australian government unveiled a proposal that would allow universities to raise tuition without any regulatory restraints. Officials say the changes would make schools more competitive, but opponents believe college in Australia will become unaffordable.

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  • What to Look for in an Internship (and 3 Red Flags)

    One argument in the growing debate about whether interns should be paid is that too many companies benefit from the free labor of interns. This goes against the grain of what an internship experience was originally designed to be: an important part of the intern's education. One way to address this is to examine the quality of the internship. Here is what to look for and what to avoid.
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  • Should Colleges Be Held Accountable for the Success of Students?

    It’s been a year since the White House announced its plan for a new college rating system and most college presidents still don’t love it. The idea of being held accountable for the success of students doesn’t sit well with many administrators. Yet, with student debt mounting, full-time professors dwindling, and the cost of tuition skyrocketing, colleges may have to get comfortable with showing they’re worth it.
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  • PayScale at SXSW: Vote to Find Out How to Get the Career of Your Dreams

    Over the past few years, South by Southwest has grown from a music festival into a multi-disciplinary cultural event. Whatever you're interested in -- film, education, the environment, or emerging technologies -- you can bet there's an upcoming panel devoted to innovations that will change that field. This year, PayScale has two panels up for consideration, both focusing on how education and training can help you get the job you want and money you deserve.

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  • Want to Make a Good First Impression? Here's What to Do

    Going on a job interview or meeting with a new client, you want to put your best foot forward and make this person want to work with you. Understand how different behaviors affect first impressions, and use them to your advantage.
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  • Student Loan Bill Introduced by Marco Rubio and Mark Warner

    A bipartisan effort addressing the student loan crisis is underway with new legislation aimed at making payments more manageable and reducing defaults. The Dynamic Repayment Act was introduced in the Senate last week by Senators Marco Rubio (R-Fl.) and Mark Warner (D-Va.). Struggling borrowers are no doubt hopeful about possible relief, but no one should hold their breath. Congress will still have to approve.
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  • Which College Majors Study the Most? [infographic]

    The average student spends 17 hours a week preparing for class, according to The National Survey of Student Engagement. That includes studying, reading, analyzing data, and doing assignments and lab work. That's far less than the 45 or so hours per week recommended by most schools for students taking 15 credits of coursework, but not every major is equal when it comes to study time.

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  • Court Upholds U. of Texas Affirmative Action Policy

    Consideration of race in admissions will continue at the University of Texas per a federal appeals court ruling this week. In a 2-1 vote, the appeals court upheld an earlier district court ruling which found the school’s use of race as a supplemental factor in bringing together a diverse student population to be fair. However, the school's fight to keep affirmative action is not over.
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  • U.S. Schools Are Failing Students in the Global Economy

    The good news is that the worldwide workforce is gaining in vital skill sets and abilities. The bad news is that United States workers are lagging behind the rest of the world. And the gap is growing, which is a dangerous trend for the U.S.A.

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  • The Relationship Between College Graduation, Race, and Time? It’s Complicated

    The race gap has narrowed significantly in college enrollments, with 65 percent of black high school graduates attending college, compared to just under 70 percent of whites in 2011, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. However, the gap in graduation rates remains wide and admission to college has little value if a degree isn’t the end result.

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  • Parents Value Education But Won't Pay for College

    More parents are requiring their children to either take out loans or pay for their college educations out of pocket.
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  • SAT Critics Need to Wise Up

    The College Board recently made an announcement about its plans to change the SAT starting spring of 2016. Many believe this news is in response to mounting pressure from critics of standardized testing. Yet, those who have been most critical about tests like the SAT seem to be missing the point.
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  • Wealthy College Presidents May Be the Reason You’re Broke [infographic]

    A recent report released by the Institute for Policy Studies finds that student debt and low-wage faculty labor are rising faster at state universities with the highest-paid presidents. Usually those three hotly debated issues: student debt, increased use of part-time faculty, and inflated executive pay are discussed as separate issues, but researchers wondered if the three were related. What they found shows that all three are connected in ways worthy of a Charles Dickens novel.

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  • Women Need to Fall in Love With Computer Science ASAP

    Last month, Google revealed, for the first time ever, just how big the company’s gender gap is. Only 30 percent of Google’s overall employees are women and when looking specifically at tech-related jobs, the number drops to 17 percent. As it turns out, Google isn’t the only tech company with alarmingly low numbers of women.

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  • Starbucks Offers Free Online College Classes to Employees

    Want to get that bachelor's degree you’ve always wanted, but couldn’t afford? Become a barista. The Starbucks Corporation announced Monday that it's going to finance online degrees for employees via Arizona State University. The Starbucks College Achievement Plan, the first of its kind, will be available to U.S. Starbucks employees working at least 20 hours a week.

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  • College Enrollment Is Dropping and That's Not a Bad Thing

    According to a recent report by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, some older students are actually leaving school to return to an improving job market. Since last year, enrollment dropped by 0.8 percent; over the previous year, enrollment declined 2.3 percent.

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  • Obama Signs an Executive Order Extending Student Loan Debt Cap

    Yesterday, President Barack Obama sat down with Tumblr founder David Karp to do a live Q&A on the service, answering questions about student loans and his recent executive order expanding the Pay-as-You-Earn program.

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  • College Choice: Substance Trumps Style for a Happy Life

    Feeling pressured to gain acceptance to an elite college? Don’t. According to a new Gallup-Purdue University study, it’s not where you study that matters in life, but what happens while you’re there. Researchers surveyed 30,000 college graduates and found that a person’s overall well-being and engagement in their work after college has little to do with where they went to school, but rather is influenced by the formative experiences they had while they were there.

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