• How to Protect Yourself When Your Boss Is Dishonest
    You've likely had a bad boss or two in your past, but have you ever had one that was corrupt, or who wanted you to act dishonestly? It can be quite the rock-and-a-hard-place situation, when the person who approves your timecards is asking you to break the rules (or the law). So when you're put in these awkward, or even dangerous positions, what can you do? Believe it or not, there are ways to fight back that don't include standing up and yelling, "J'accuse!"
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do I Get Paid for That Snow Day?
    Snow days aren't as much fun for adults as they are for kids, especially if you're not quite sure what inclement weather means for your paycheck. In this week's roundup, we look at who gets paid during snow days and other days off due to inclement weather, plus how to protect yourself from age discrimination on your resume and what to do right after a networking event.
  • 4 Legal Decisions That Fell on the Side of Workers in 2015
    Some of the legal decisions that were made in 2015 didn't do much to help workers. For example, Wisconsin was added to the list of Right-to-Work states this year. Many feel that these laws, which change how unions collect fees from the workers they represent, hurt unions and the middle class. In other disappointing news, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the Integrity Staffing Solutions vs. Busk case, mandating that companies are not required to compensate workers for the time they spend in security-screening at the end of their shifts – or for any task that's not an "integral and indispensable" part of their job, for that matter. But thankfully, the legal news for workers wasn't all bad this past year. So, let's focus on the good, shall we?
  • 5 Surprising Facts About Lunch Breaks
    Most of the time, lunch doesn't really feel like that big of a deal. If we're able to take a lunch break, we generally feel glad, and enjoy a short respite from the craziness of the workday. Often though, we lunch at our desks, or on our feet, unable to take the time to sit down and eat, even just for a few minutes. Still though, what does it really matter? Well, here are a few surprising facts about lunch breaks that might inspire you to pay a little more attention to how you spend this time.
  • We Are All the Urban Outfitters Employees Who Were Asked to Work for Free
    Last week, Gawker reported that URBN, the Philadelphia-based company that owns Urban Outfitters, Anthropologie, and Free People, sent out a memo asking salaried workers to volunteer their weekend time, unpacking boxes during the October rush. But don't worry: the memo made it clear that this was a "team-building activity." Furthermore, lunch would be provided.
  • Wage Theft and 'Unapproved' Overtime: Is Your Employer Stealing From You?
    Once upon a time, there was a hardworking employee named Jane Doe. Jane's employer had given her so much work, Jane had to work overtime to complete all her tasks. Jane diligently completed her work, putting in the required overtime hours to do so. Then, Jane requested overtime pay from her employer. She assumed that there would be no problem getting paid. But, to Jane's surprise, her employer refused to pay overtime, claiming that without prior approval, they did not have to pay Jane for the extra hours.
  • Feeling Lazy? Bask in These Stories of 4 People Who Got Paid to Do Nothing
    Earlier this year, PayScale told the story of A. K. Verma, an Indian civil servant who managed to avoid coming to work for 24 years before eventually getting fired for "willful absence of duty" in January 2015. Though his case, a byproduct of India's tough-to-penetrate labor laws, is shocking, Verma is not the only employee who has been paid to do nothing. Plenty of workers have found themselves in situations in which they are paid not to work.
  • The NFL Cheerleader Wage Theft War
    Football's most famous fans may finally be getting a voice. After years of NFL cheerleaders enduring embarrassingly low pay and overall poor treatment, working conditions seem to be improving. As a recent New York Times article noted, "The cultural dial is turning." So, what exactly is changing, and why?
  • 5 Things You Didn't Know About FMLA
    The purpose of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is to help employees balance work and personal or medical needs. It was passed in 1993 during the Clinton administration as a way to protect the jobs of workers who needed to take time off to care for themselves or family members, including babies. (The U.S. is the only industrialized country in the world that does not offer paid maternity leave.) Workers who are contemplating taking leave often find themselves confused about what the FMLA does and doesn't cover. Here's what you need to know.
  • Paid Parental Leave Continues to Gain Momentum in the US
    Lately, a lot more American companies have been jumping on the paid paternal leave bandwagon and finally offering their employees more paid time off after having a baby. This is great news for working parents in America – because, if you're a working parent, then you know that the struggle is very real. We'll take a look at how some companies in the U.S. are stepping up their paid paternal leave game, even if the country as a whole still lags behind the rest of the world.
  • What You Should Know About Pay Transparency in the Workplace
    The conversation about pay transparency has been buzzing recently after a couple of Google employees attempted to create online methods through which they and their co-workers could share their salaries with one another internally, in order to ensure that everyone was getting paid what they deserved. However, despite Google's assurance that employees are free to share their salaries with one another, it responded negatively to both attempts and argued that such online sharing methods threatened confidentiality and security.
  • The First Women to Beat Ranger School
    It's impressive news. Two women – Capt. Kristen Griest and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver – overcame seemingly overwhelming odds to pass the Army's Ranger School, at Fort Benning, Georgia. It's a daunting feat for any soldier, but for female soldiers, it's also a milestone: until this year, they weren't even allowed to attempt the leadership course.
  • 5 Reasons Employees Get Denied for Workers' Compensation
    Millions of Americans across the nation spend their days working in risky environments. Many workers push their physical limits every day, lifting, pushing, pulling, crouching, and crawling. Some are exposed to dangerous fumes, sharp objects, extreme heights, and harsh elements. Even in seemingly safe environments, employees can still be at risk of getting hurt. Even worse is that employees can put themselves at risk of not receiving appropriate compensation for their work-related injuries or illnesses.
  • What You Need to Know About Furloughs
    In an ideal world, there would be no issues regarding compensation for work. You would go to work when you are supposed to, and in exchange, your employer would pay you your agreed-upon wage when he or she was supposed to do so. Unfortunately, due to problems of budgetary mismanagement on employers' parts, some workers have found that getting paid is not quite that simple. That is why it is important for all employees to understand their rights when it comes to issues like furloughs and reductions in pay. It is important to note that if you are a member of a labor union, you may have additional contractual rights in addition to the rights discussed here.
  • What's Your Employer's Philosophy: Work to Live or Live to Work?
    In 2006, Treehouse CEO Ryan Carson decided to give employees of the Portland, Oregon-based technology education company three-day weekends every week, arguing that living to work instead of working to live is not the best (or at least only) key to a company's profitability and overall success. But, that doesn't mean that his decision was motivated solely by a desire to be a more humane boss. Employers making similar decisions are just as interested in the bottom line as they are in making workers' lives better. It turns out, working less sometimes means producing more – and better – work.
  • Portland, Maine Accidentally Gives Tipped Workers a Raise
    Language matters, especially when it comes to legislation. Recently, we had proof of this when the Affordable Care Act nearly deflated thanks to an alternate interpretation of the phrase "established by the state." Now, city officials in Portland, Maine, find themselves in a similar bind: confusion over the language in a recent bill to raise the city's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour led city council to nearly double tipped workers' wages, from $3.75 to $6.35 an hour, as of January 1. The accidental raise was met with dismay from restaurant owners and delight from labor organizers. Both dismay and delight, however, might be short-lived.
  • Bill Would Allow Companies to Fire Unwed Mothers
    The recent Supreme Court ruling that determined same-sex couples have the same marriage rights as opposite-sex couples has been met with both celebration and consternation. On the consternation side, the most immediate outcome has been in the form of the First Amendment Defense Act, a bill with the stated purpose of protecting employers from discrimination, if they act "in accordance with a religious belief or moral conviction that marriage is or should be recognized as the union of one man and one woman, or that sexual relations are properly reserved to such a marriage." This would obviously have big implications for same-sex couples, but it would also potentially affect other workers whose personal lives don't match their employers' beliefs, including unmarried women who have children.
  • What You Need to Know Employment Discrimination After the Same-Sex Marriage Ruling
    One of the major frontiers in the fight for equality for people of all sexual orientations has been the battle for marriage equality. The United States Supreme Court has now finally ruled that same-sex couples have the same marriage rights nationwide as their opposite-sex counterparts. Unfortunately, this is far from the end of the fight. Discrimination based on sexual orientation is still extremely common in the workplace, and in much of the country it is still completely legal.
  • What You Should Know About Religious Headwear in the Workplace
    Religion plays a fundamental role in many people's lives. For some, practicing religion is a much more active process than just attending services. Some religions require adherents to wear specific clothing, for example. This can create issues when a religious person seeks out employment, because those of a mind to discriminate based on religious beliefs can easily identify followers of certain religions based on that clothing. Fortunately, there are laws preventing this and a recent United States Supreme Court decision has reaffirmed these protections against religious discrimination.
  • Prospective Employers Asking for W-2 Forms: A Cover for Discrimination?
    In the current economy, the hiring process and salary negotiations are already slanted toward employers and against employees. This makes a new trend among employers to require potential hires to provide previous W-2 forms – sometimes years' worth of them – particularly worrying. But is it illegal?

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