• 5 Things Black Friday Workers Really Wish You Knew
    As an ode to our friends out there working in the trenches on Black Friday, I searched through the Reddit archives to find some of the best advice from those who are working or have worked on Black Friday. Everything from advice on standing in line to insights about beating on retail doors, and why it's not socially acceptable, awaits you in this post.
  • 5 Signs You're in a Toxic Work Environment
    Even if you absolutely love your job, there's always going to be something about it that you wish you could change. That's the ideal scenario; if you're lucky, you have an issue or two that you'd like to resolve, but nothing that impacts your job satisfaction as a whole. On the other hand, if your problems are beyond minor complaints – if you feel threatened, suffocated, or compromised on your principles, work ethic, or professional and personal well-being – you may be working in a toxic environment.
  • SCIENCE: Why Do We Go to Work When We're Sick?
    There is a real, dumb reason we go into work when we're sick, and it's super scientific. We broke down analysis by the researchers at the University of East Anglia to help us understand this madness.
  • When Your Boss Just Won't Listen
    It is very frustrating when you talk to your boss and he or she won't listen. Your repeated attempts at getting your thoughts across fall on deaf years and you don't feel respected or valued. If this is a problem you face at work, then you might need to change your approach to communicating.
  • These Might Be the 5 Coolest Offices in the US (and Canada)
    PayScale recently gave readers a look inside some of the coolest offices around the globe. After conducting extensive research and drooling over countless worthy contenders, we narrowed the list to a handful of creative and unusual spaces, including the live orange grove of Google Tel Aviv, the James Bond-esque Cold War bunker offices of Swedish Internet provider, Bahnhof, and the vintage carousel horses at Ogilvy & Mather's Guanghzou, China outpost. To follow up on our list of incredible office spaces abroad, we compiled the following stateside edition outlining the most unbelievable offices right here in the U. S. of A. (and one in Canada). Prepare for a major case of office envy — the only antidote to which is the solace you can take from knowing how hard it must be to get actual work done in offices this cool.
  • The Top 4 Consulting Firms for Work-Life Balance
    Consultants have a reputation for working long hours and traveling a ton. They have to be flexible go-getters who find creative solutions to problems or questions, and put clients at ease during times of stress. Even though a recent study found that many consultants might not be putting in as many hours as they claim, there is no doubt it's a demanding and fast-paced job.
  • Survey: 76 Percent of Workers Are More Productive Outside of the Office
    Seventy-six percent of 2,600 people polled in a recent FlexJobs survey chose anywhere but the office during work hours as the ideal place to get "important work done." According to the company's 4th Annual Super Survey, which asked respondents to choose "their location of choice to be most productive on important work-related projects," 50 percent chose their home, and 12 percent chose an alternate location such as a coffee shop, library, or co-working space.
  • The 5 Five Stages of Wanting to Quit Your Job
    Making the decision to quit your job generally happens gradually, and then all at once. If you're in the midst of making up your mind, the important thing is not to let your emotions get the better of you. It starts with being aware of what's happening during the process. Here's what to expect when you're pondering a jump to bigger and better things – or even just an escape from a dream job that's turned into a nightmare.
  • When It Comes to Work Hours, Less Is More
    A few weeks ago, The New York Times put Amazon's work culture under the microscope . While many employees, both current and past, have chimed in since the article came out, we're now finding time to turn the focus to our own work lives. Should we all strive to be as driven as Amazonians who love their 60-plus hour work weeks? Should we all keep the cube lights on into the wee hours to show how much we "care"? The answer, despite our best efforts to die at our desks, may be "Nope."
  • 7 Killer Interview Questions Managers Should Ask Prospective Hires 

    Forty-six percent of new hires don't last longer than 18 months, primarily due to "poor interpersonal skills," according to a study by leadership training company Leadership IQ, despite the fact that candidates are arguably more qualified than ever before. Certainly, they're more educated: 873,000 Americans are projected to earn master's degree in 2016/17 (a more than 50 percent rise since 1997), according to the U.S. Department of Education. The bottom line is that a candidate's resume isn't the only — and at times not even the most important — predictor for staying power or long-term success.
  • Are Tech Jobs Just Crazy Hard on Workers?
    The short answer is "yes." It's also "no" and "it depends." The recent New York Times critique of Amazon's work culture — the most commented-on piece in the publication's history — has resulted in a firestorm of both backlash and support from the media and tech titans. Former and current Amazon employees have chimed in, sharing views and experiences that both support and negate the Times' claim that Amazon is a company guilty of "conducting an experiment in how far it can push white-collar workers to get them to achieve its ever-expanding ambitions."
  • Bruising or Beneficial: In the Amazon Debate, What Really Counts Is What You Want (From Your Employer)
    Ever since The New York Times published its scathing, 5,000-word takedown of work culture at Amazon, the topic of work-life balance has been the talk of the town. The commentary won't stop, whether it's from Amazon's most rabid defenders or passionate opponents. Even famously silent CEO Jeff Bezos has issued a response. The resulting debate has been fascinating (and probably a bit cathartic for anybody who found themselves working over the weekend), but searching for a definitive answer about whether Amazon is "good" or "bad" probably won't make a difference in your daily life or sense of job satisfaction. What you can, and should, take from the ongoing conversation is the importance of corporate culture in general and its effect on the way you think about the idea of total compensation, and ultimately, the way you negotiate salary.
  • Is Amazon a 'Soulless, Dystopian Workplace'?
    This weekend, The New York Times published an exposé of working conditions at Amazon corporate. Amazonians, the article claims, are required to work long hours, in a data-driven environment that means constant performance evaluations; are expected to answer emails after midnight, sometimes at the prompting of follow-up texts; and are encouraged to inform on one another to management. Workers who don't come up to snuff allegedly are culled in layoffs that a former employee describes as "purposeful Darwinism" – some former employees claimed to have been pushed out after miscarriages or cancer. In an internal memo shortly after publication, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos responded, saying that the company described doesn't match his view of the organization and urging workers to come forward if they disagree.
  • The Dress Code Debate: Are Mandals Affecting Your Performance?
    For the northern regions of this country, summer is an especially sacred time: by April, 50-degree weather is impetus for shorts and a t-shirt, whereas Los Angeles folks are still bundled up in the low-to-mid 70s. That said, when summer heat rolls around, it can be especially tempting to take advantage of those fashion mistakes that society will justify in July. If you're an employee of HP, however, they just became much more than a simple faux pas.
  • These Might Be the 5 Coolest Offices in the World
    Imagine a work world in which the PowerPoint presentation for your weekly team meeting was projected from a vintage carousel horse, a midday snack meant plucking an orange from an indoor grove near your desk, or your daily commute required traveling 100 feet underground to a former nuclear war bunker submerged beneath a mountain via tunnel. For workers employed by the companies that made our list of five of the world's most ogle-worthy offices, these seeming fantasies are actual realities of a typical day at the office.
  • The Cardinals' New Hire Can Teach Managers All Something About Good Candidates
    "Fifteen years of experience playing football, first woman to play with men, and doctorate in psychology — I hope I can figure out something to contribute in there." That's what Dr. Jen Welter had to say when a reporter asked the new Arizona Cardinals assistant coaching intern, "What can you offer?" It's the kind of question managers should be asking every candidate up for a new job — but her answer, power-packed as it is, really only scratches the surface.
  • What's Your Employer's Philosophy: Work to Live or Live to Work?
    In 2006, Treehouse CEO Ryan Carson decided to give employees of the Portland, Oregon-based technology education company three-day weekends every week, arguing that living to work instead of working to live is not the best (or at least only) key to a company's profitability and overall success. But, that doesn't mean that his decision was motivated solely by a desire to be a more humane boss. Employers making similar decisions are just as interested in the bottom line as they are in making workers' lives better. It turns out, working less sometimes means producing more – and better – work.
  • Need to Vent? BetterCompany Lets You Talk Anonymously About Work
    One of the trickiest and most annoying things you'll have to deal with in your career is office drama. One app aims to combat office politics by creating a "safe place" for co-workers to discuss work matters openly and honestly with one another, all while remaining anonymous. Read on to learn more (and where you can sign up).
  • Incredible Company Perks: Top 3 Cash Rewards
    As PayScale has reported in the past, the crazy perks that employers sometimes offer to lure potential hires or satisfy existing ones can be unusual and/or extremely valuable. While it goes without saying that you'd be hard-pressed to find an employee willing to work without monetary compensation — it's called a "job" for a reason, after all — some companies have advanced the ever-escalating incentives competition even further by offering cash-based benefits on top of existing salaries or wages. From hiring bounties and quitting bonuses, a staff liquor fund, and even a budget to overcome your fears (seriously), here's a list of the top cash-based incentives that employers have implemented in order to stay competitive in attracting quality talent.
  • The Most Appealing Employers, According to Millennials
    Where do millennials want to work? As a part of a six-part series on millennials, Universum, a global research and advisory firm which specializes in employer branding, offered up some data about employers as they are perceived by the group that has become the largest generation in the U.S. labor force.

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