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  • A Growing Crop of Female Versions of the Old Boy's Club Make Waves Online
    From T. Swift's smoking hot girl army to Tina Fey and Amy Poehler's whip-smart comic partnership, to Zooey Deschanel, Molly McAleer, and Sophia Rossi's infectious Hello Giggles girl-power lifestyle hub, female friendship-based collaborations are nothing new. What is new is the increasing number of collaboration-based opportunities that female professionals now have that can further their careers and actually put cash in the bank. A growing crop of increasingly specialized, made-for-women-by-women virtual communities like CodeChix and The Li.st offer opportunities that range from job referrals to speaking gigs to potential investors. Read on for a round-up of veterans and newcomers both big and small.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Megan Baker, Senior Director of Program Management, FreeWheel
    Meet Megan Baker, Senior Director at FreeWheel, a company that produces and manages the technology behind ad-supported content for some of the heaviest hitters in the television industry. (Clients include ABC, AOL, DIRECTV, ESPN, NBC Universal, Turner Broadcasting, and Viacom, to name just a few.) Drawing on the same work ethic and no-holds-barred gumption she used to put herself through NYU by balancing multiple jobs while maintaining a full course load, the Long Island native forged an impressive career spanning multiple industries before landing at her current gig at FreeWheel.
  • Pay It Forward: The CEO Giving Employees' Kids a Full Ride to College
    One CEO is taking employee benefits to the next level – the next generation, to be exact. Boxed CEO Chieh Huang is offering to pay college tuition for all of his employees' children as an incentive to remain loyal to the online wholesaler. Seem too good to be true?
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Carlo Chalisea, Founder/Owner/Chef at Don Lucho's Food Truck
    Carlo Chalisea served Don Lucho's first sandwich off the grill himself in August of 2013. Now, two years later, the 30-year-old Seattle-based chef and entrepreneur is slanging his imaginative Rococo and Aji Amarillo-smothered Chicharron and Lomo Saltado creations to sandwich-loving Seattleites all over town as many as five days a week, and has trouble keeping up with demand even after hiring multiple employees. As one of the only authentic Peruvian food options in an area where the South American country’s cuisine is still largely unknown, the mobile sandwichera, which is named after Chalisea's father, has been growing apace with the local food truck scene as a whole, which exploded following the Seattle City Council’s unanimous vote to allow mobile food vendors to sell on public streets in 2011 (the state’s legalization of recreational marijuana in 2012 couldn’t have hurt things, either). At least some of the sandwich truck’s growth is the result of carving out a unique niche within the city’s larger mobile food community by way of standing gigs at local breweries, which have, like the trucks, been cropping up like wildfire in recent years. Along with this fortuitous strategy, the majority of his savings, and good old fashioned hard work, Chalisea credits Don Lucho’s success to innovative takes on his mom's family recipes, and a passionate dream to bring his Peruvian culture and cuisine to his hometown.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Roxie Hunt, Hair Stylist/DIY Hair Mogul
    Most hair stylists cut and color hair. For Roxie Jane Hunt, however, shears and color baths were just the beginning. Over the past decade, the Pacific Northwest-based stylist, writer, entrepreneur, and mother of two has used her cutting and coloring chops as the springboard for a bonafide DIY hair empire that extends far beyond the walls of a salon or the conventional tools of her trade.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Giulia Heiman, Bi-coastal Hairstylist, Beauty Columnist, Entrepreneur
    While most stylists would consider a permanent chair at a prestigious salon in New York City the most coveted of covetable gigs in their industry, for Seattle-born and NYC/LA-based hairstylist Giulia Heiman, cutting her chops as a Senior Stylist at the Ted Gibson Salon on 5th Avenue was merely a stepping stone for a larger, even more unique career entirely of her own making.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Peter Charbonnier, Owner/Brewer at Populuxe Brewing
    Most beer enthusiasts resign themselves to enjoying their passion on their own time, brewing and drinking when they're not at work. But for Peter Charbonnier, owner and brewer at Populuxe Brewing in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle, beer is more than just a hobby: it's a full-time dream job.
  • 5 Ways to Avoid Waking up on the Wrong Side of the Bed
    You've just woken up, and you're grumpy. And, that bad mood is rubbing off on everyone and everything around you. It's affecting your productivity, your relationship with your family, friends, and co-workers. It just sets you up for feeling like the whole day has started off wrong. We usually refer to it as "getting up on the wrong side of the bed." And, it's usually one of those phrases that we throw at each other, when we're annoyed, hurt, or offended.
  • 5 Ways to Get Tough

    5 Ways to Get Tough
    We all want to be tough. It's something that was ingrained in us from an early age -- more so for boys than for girls -- but the impression we may get is that we should be able to handle everything that is thrown our way. But, what would happen if we set all that aside for a minute, and we re-evaluated what it meant to be tough? On the job, if we took a closer look at our toughness, we might just see that we've approached it in all the wrong ways.
  • If You Want to Go Places in Your Career, Be Still
    It's frustrating to have people remind you to "stop and smell the roses" when your life seems to be going 1,000 miles per hour -- but that doesn't mean it's bad advice. Learn how taking a step back can actually help you move forward in your life and your career.
  • 3 Promising Second Careers That Don’t Require Another 4-Year Degree
    Are you unhappy with the career you chose? If so, you're definitely not alone. Studies show that approximately 80 percent of people are also unhappy with their career choice. Giving your career a second life doesn't have to mean obtaining another four-year degree. Here are three promising careers for you to consider. Hopefully, one will bring you the career bliss you deserve.
  • Meet the YouTube Millionaires
    Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)
  • 7 Businesses You Can Start With $100 or Less
    Want to work for yourself? Good news. Starting your own business might be easier than you think. Even better news: you can start your business with a very small investment. Here's a list of ideas that can get your entrepreneurial juices flowing.
  • Why Fear Success?

    Why Fear Success?
    It may seem completely counterintuitive, but one of the greatest obstacles to success is often fear that we may succeed. It's that petrified stagnation that prevents us from looking for another job, pursuing advancement, and even taking actions we know will bring about change. Perhaps we've become so accustomed to failure that the idea of success is unbelievable. We don't want to get our hopes up, and we may also fear the side effects that would come with success.
  • Working Moms Are Still Getting the Short End of the Stick
    Let's face the facts: being a working mother is exhausting and, oftentimes, completely defeating. Many women put their own career and life aspirations on hold to raise children, but very few of these ladies actually speak openly about the endless struggles they face on a daily basis. Here are the facts that you should know about the realities of working mothers and what you can do to help.
  • The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs
    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.
  • 3 Women Making a Big Difference in Tech for Future Generations
    Studies show that women in tech are vastly underrepresented, but that's not stopping these three tech-savvy ladies from making a huge difference for future generations of techies. See how these women are using their know-how to pave a new path for a brighter and more balanced future in technology.
  • 5 At-Home Business Ideas for Stay-at-Home Parents
    Childcare is expensive, but so is opting out of your career to be a stay-at-home parent. If you want to leave the rat race, but keep investing in your professional development (and 401k), starting your own at-home business might be the answer. Becoming your own boss doesn't have to be scary -- actually, it can be enjoyable and empowering at the same time.
  • 5 Ways to Get Organized and Prep for Your Best Year Yet
    Now that the holiday craze has died down and it's back to reality, it's time to get serious about what lies ahead for 2015. Before you dive headfirst into your new year's resolutions list (which you dusted off from last year), we've compiled a list that will help you get your life and career on track for the coming year.
  • 5 Steps for Building Your Own Professional Website
    Whether you are a job seeker, an independent jewelry designer, a freelance journalist, an aspiring filmmaker, or the owner of a new food cart, a strong online presence is a key part of every professional and small business's marketing strategy. The backbone of this presence is your website. And unless your small business is a web design company, or you are successful enough to hire a programming whiz (in which case you would have probably already needed a website by now), you most likely have neither the funds nor skills to fork over thousands to a professional for the perfect site. Thankfully, in today's sea of freelancers, entrepreneurs, and independent contractors, a lack of money and programming knowledge does not stand in the way of a great-looking site that does not break the bank.