• Moms Stay Home When Kids Are Sick
    Why do women still make less money than men? It's not all about overt prejudice on the behalf of employers. PayScale's data show that part of the issue is that women tend to gravitate toward careers that give back -- and pay less. While socially conditioned altruism might be part of the reason for that choice, another factor also influences women's career decisions: the need for a flexible schedule. Recent research shows that women are 10 times more likely than men to stay home with sick kids.
  • 4 Ways Boston's New Program Could Fix the Gender Wage Gap
    While recent data has shown that the gender wage gap isn’t as wide as we thought it was, there is still a gap. In Boston, for example, women make 83 cents for each dollar a man makes and in an effort to close that gap, the city is attempting a new, different method. Here are four ways this new program could actually work.
  • Turn That Frown Upside Down: Are You a Happy Employee? [infographic]
    The sad reality of having a job is that you probably hate it, at least some of the time. No one wants to do something that they "have" to do. So what does it take to make you a happy camper at work? Let's take a look at Yast.com's infographic "What Makes an Employee Happy?" to find out.
  • Women In Tech Have Advantage When It Comes to Online Jobs
    It’s no secret that the number of men working in technology careers far outnumbers women who are doing the same. And even though the amount of available technology jobs is increasing significantly, women are still trailing behind men in the race to snatching up these tech opportunities. While it’s true that they make up just a little over one-fourth of the science, tech, engineering and math (STEM) workforce, brilliant female minds have also introduced the world to some of the most innovative technological inventions and advances in history. And now, thanks to a plethora of online jobs to pick from, women can hold their own in the tech workforce while embracing more flexibility and greater work-life balance.
  • Coming Closer to Pay Parity for Women
    The Equal Pay Act outlawed employers from gender-discriminatory pay practices in 1963, but pay still isn't entirely equal. Now, legislation seeks to expand existing law to enact more protections against male-female pay disparities. Fed up, women are "leaning in" hard on this one, which means the Paycheck Fairness Act, twice rejected by Congress, might now stand a better chance of becoming law.