• Could Salary Transparency Close the Gender Wage Gap?
    Little by little, cultural taboos in the U.S. are being eradicated. With each passing generation, we grow increasingly comfortable with discussions that would have stunned those who came before us. However, there is one remaining taboo in our society that is going just as strong as ever: money. We don't talk about money, not with our friends, often not even with our families. And, sharing our salaries with our co-workers? Well, that feels completely out of the question. But, there might be something to gain from talking about pay with our colleagues and getting a little honest with each other.
  • Does the Boss's Gender Change How Men Negotiate Salary?
    Salary negotiation is important. The salary you command at the start of a new job impacts your pay for the remainder of your time with the company, and possibly beyond. Over time, not negotiating can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost pay. Furthermore, people who ask for raises earn more than those who don't. We know that women are less likely to negotiate than men, but gender can also impact negotiation from the other side of the table. Recent research suggests that men negotiate differently when their boss is a woman.
  • Pope Francis Weighs in on Equal Pay Debate
    Although the issue has been with us forever (and isn't predicted to end until 2058) the equal pay debate seems to be heating up right now. Recently released research shows that the gender wage gap exists across all regions and most industries, and the effects are felt by women of every age and from every background.
  • Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Your 401(k)
    In the United States, 401(k) is a retirement savings plan provided by the employer. The plan provides employees with the option to defer a percentage of pay toward their retirement account, to be withdrawn at a later time. Retirement plans like these can be a major perk, especially if the company matches some of the employee's contributions. Here's how to get the most out of your 401(k).
  • There Are More CEOs Named John Than There Are Female CEOs
    Data and statistics tell us a lot about our world. The trouble is, sometimes numbers don't drive a point home the way, say, a narrative can. Sometimes, it takes a different kind of study to illuminate an issue in a way that resonates for people.
  • NBA Asks Men to 'Lean In Together'
    The NBA, alongside the WNBA and, recently released a new PSA. Featured big names, such as LeBron James and Dwayne Wade, speak about how they support the women in their lives. "When men lean in, everyone wins," the announcement declares.
  • The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs
    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.
  • Unemployment Is Down, So Where Are the Wages?
    If you've been waiting for a fatter paycheck to find you in 2015, so far the news has been discouraging. Unemployment rates are down, which is exciting news, but we still haven't seen an improvement in wages. Here's why a lower unemployment rate hasn't translated to higher pay -- yet.
  • Talking About Gender Stereotyping May Reinforce It
    We won't erase the gender wage gap by ignoring it, but a recent article from Sheryl Sandberg and Wharton professor Adam Grant shows that just talking about it won't be enough to solve the problem, either. In fact, discussing stereotypes might just make the problem worse, not better.
  • Moms Stay Home When Kids Are Sick
    Why do women still make less money than men? It's not all about overt prejudice on the behalf of employers. PayScale's data show that part of the issue is that women tend to gravitate toward careers that give back -- and pay less. While socially conditioned altruism might be part of the reason for that choice, another factor also influences women's career decisions: the need for a flexible schedule. Recent research shows that women are 10 times more likely than men to stay home with sick kids.
  • 4 Ways Boston's New Program Could Fix the Gender Wage Gap
    While recent data has shown that the gender wage gap isn’t as wide as we thought it was, there is still a gap. In Boston, for example, women make 83 cents for each dollar a man makes and in an effort to close that gap, the city is attempting a new, different method. Here are four ways this new program could actually work.
  • Turn That Frown Upside Down: Are You a Happy Employee? [infographic]
    The sad reality of having a job is that you probably hate it, at least some of the time. No one wants to do something that they "have" to do. So what does it take to make you a happy camper at work? Let's take a look at's infographic "What Makes an Employee Happy?" to find out.
  • Women In Tech Have Advantage When It Comes to Online Jobs
    It’s no secret that the number of men working in technology careers far outnumbers women who are doing the same. And even though the amount of available technology jobs is increasing significantly, women are still trailing behind men in the race to snatching up these tech opportunities. While it’s true that they make up just a little over one-fourth of the science, tech, engineering and math (STEM) workforce, brilliant female minds have also introduced the world to some of the most innovative technological inventions and advances in history. And now, thanks to a plethora of online jobs to pick from, women can hold their own in the tech workforce while embracing more flexibility and greater work-life balance.
  • Coming Closer to Pay Parity for Women
    The Equal Pay Act outlawed employers from gender-discriminatory pay practices in 1963, but pay still isn't entirely equal. Now, legislation seeks to expand existing law to enact more protections against male-female pay disparities. Fed up, women are "leaning in" hard on this one, which means the Paycheck Fairness Act, twice rejected by Congress, might now stand a better chance of becoming law.