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  • The High Cost of College Is Leaving Many Students Out in the Cold
    College should be one of the most memorable times in a person's life, not a time of financial stress, anxiety, and hopelessness. However, with the rising cost of attending college and student loan debt more than quadrupling over the past two decades, obtaining a degree is proving to be a strain, especially for students who are financially burdened. One group of low-income students from Columbia University is using social media to shed light on the dismal realities of being a poor student in one of the most prestigious and expensive Ivy League schools in the nation, with a Facebook page entitled Columbia University Class Confessions.
  • Hilarious Responses to College Rejection Letters
    For most of us, spring is a happy time; March and April are months signifying the promise of barbecues, blooming flowers, and beach weather. But for the high school seniors around the country racing to their mailboxes every day after school to check for acceptance or rejection letters from their dream schools, March and April are months that will impact the rest of their lives.
  • 3 Things Millennials Want, 3 Things They Could Do Without
    Born between 1980 and 2000, Millennials are the largest generation group in US history, comprising roughly 75.3 million of the nation's population and surpassing even the Baby Boomer generation. Needless to say, it's important to understand how this crowd thinks and functions, seeing the tremendous impact they have on the workplace and how it will evolve in the very near future. Here's a list of three things Millennials want in their lives, and three things they could simply do without … for now.
  • 5 Reasons Why STEM Has a Woman Problem
    How is it that science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) companies can find solutions for some of the world's most complex problems, but they can't seem to solve the gender bias issue that keeps women out of STEM careers? According to new research, it's because we, as a culture, don't know that there's even a problem – it's unconscious, and we're all to blame.
  • Laid Off? This App Aims to Help You Beat Depression
    Social media has an amazing ability to connect people; however, with that comes both good and bad. The bad part is that anyone and everyone has the freedom to voice whatever opinion their little hearts desire, which promotes cyber bullying and allows other negativity to spread online. The good part is, the convenience and connectivity of social networks allow like-minded people to communicate, share, and help one another. One psychologist and MIT grad student, Robert Morris, used the positive aspects of social networking to formulate a site incorporating crowdsourced cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help users "debug" their negative thoughts and overcome depression.
  • 5 New Career Paths That Didn't Exist 10 Years Ago
    The workplace is changing, thanks to new technologies and new ways of thinking about work. If you're looking to venture into semi-uncharted territory in hopes of a brighter career trajectory, then you may want to consider one of these five new careers.
  • What Your Tweets and Posts Tell Recruiters Could Keep You From Getting the Job
    Would you think twice about sharing a mindless "I'm so bored" post on social media if you knew that research shows that people who do so experience higher rates of heart attacks and strokes? What's worse, research that ties social media use to emotional stability/instability is making its way into the hands of people that you probably don't want to be privy to such information: recruiters, hiring managers, and employers. Here's what you need to know about what your social media sharing is saying about you.
  • When It Comes to Job Skills, American Millennials Are in a Race to the Bottom
    The youngest workers, the ones who grew up alongside the latest and greatest technologies, have always been assumed to be more skilled in their use. It's probably been like this since the invention of the typewriter, but it's increasingly true now, in an era when most office jobs rely on digital technologies that adapt seemingly by the minute. In addition, today's young workers are more educated than ever before, boasting more years of education than any previous generation. There's just one problem: recent research shows that Gen Y workers in the U.S. are anything but highly skilled.
  • 5 Tips on Choosing a College: Confessions of an Art School Grad
    By now, we probably all know someone who struggles with student loan debt or job woes. Many of us young folk went to college hoping to make our dreams come true, only to find ourselves saddled with enormous debt and no job prospects. Young grads are still having trouble nailing down that first professional job, and many people aren't working in the industries they trained for. It wasn't exactly a walk in the park for older people either, whose careers went kaput and they had to go back to school or get new training. Stories from the Great Recession are many among us.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup:  Kickstart Your Workday, Career Lessons at Age 23, and Why Cover Letters Still Exist
    How do you start your workday? If you, like many of us, are generally a little bit late, it could be by grabbing the caffeinated beverage of your choice and hurriedly scanning your inbox. But maybe it's time for a reboot.
  • How the Great Recession Changed Millennials' Lives Forever
    It's not easy to "make it" in this country on your own. Every generation has struggled to find their professional path, to gain intellectual, personal, and financial independence, and establish a life for themselves. But, there is no doubt that the latest generation to enter the workforce, the Millennials, has had an especially difficult time getting started.
  • Who Is Late to Work and Why?
    In a recent self-reported survey, 19 percent of Americans admitted to being late for work at least once per week, if not more often -- that is almost one in five working people. Forty-eight percent, or just under half, claimed to never be late for work. The question is, who are the chronically late folks, and why do they have so much trouble getting into the office?
  • Meet the YouTube Millionaires
    Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)
  • What Millennials Can Teach Other Generations About Work-Life Balance
    The generation born between 1980 and 1995 is now firmly entrenched in the workforce, and they are committed to doing things a little differently than the generations that came before them. Their ideas are fresh and creative, and they bring unique experiences and special areas of strength to the table. With these differences in mind, it's not surprising that their professional goals, and the way millennials pursue them, are diverging from the path laid out by earlier generations.
  • The Birds and Bees of the Modern Office Romance
    In Mike Nichol's endearingly unrealistic '80s romcom Working Girl, Melanie Griffith portrays Tess McGill, an inexperienced but savvy young professional embattled in a competition for professional (and romantic) success with her powerful, idea-stealing boss Katherine Parker (Sigourney Weaver). The moral of the story? Do the right -- albeit slightly duplicitous -- thing, and you get not only your dream job, but also the guy you knew you always deserved.
  • 13 Incredible Company Perks
    From fledgling tech start-ups to household-name corporations, employers both big and small are continuously upping the ante when it comes to finding ways to keep their workers happy. While unusually cool perks like Etsy's playground-esque open lofts, or simply invaluable incentives such as the unlimited vacation days offered at Gravity Payments (that's right -- unlimited) might not be the deciding factor in someone's decision to accept a job, they can certainly be a factor. Smart employers know this, and make a point to incorporate additional takeaways into a job offer (besides the opportunity of employment itself). From onsite "Kegerators" to employer-subsidized egg freezing for female employees (seriously), here's a rundown of some of the most interesting perks* currently satisfying employees and enticing potential hires.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Gen Y Can Learn From Farmers, How PT Workers Can Manage Expectations, and Finding Office Space at Home
    Sometimes, the best career advice comes from unexpected places. For example, most office workers wouldn't think to turn to agricultural experts for wisdom -- but maybe they should.
  • 3 Things You Don't Know About Negotiating Salary
    To compile the recently issued Salary Negotiation Guide, PayScale asked 31,000 people whether they'd ever negotiated their salary. Fifty-seven percent said they had not. Given that not negotiating salary can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of a lifetime -- and that 75 percent of people who ask get at least some kind of salary bump -- it obviously makes sense to hit the bargaining table before you accept a new job offer or let your annual review go by without initiating a discussion about money. Still reluctant? Arm yourself with the facts.
  • 3 Women Making a Big Difference in Tech for Future Generations
    Studies show that women in tech are vastly underrepresented, but that's not stopping these three tech-savvy ladies from making a huge difference for future generations of techies. See how these women are using their know-how to pave a new path for a brighter and more balanced future in technology.
  • 5 Steps for Building Your Own Professional Website
    Whether you are a job seeker, an independent jewelry designer, a freelance journalist, an aspiring filmmaker, or the owner of a new food cart, a strong online presence is a key part of every professional and small business's marketing strategy. The backbone of this presence is your website. And unless your small business is a web design company, or you are successful enough to hire a programming whiz (in which case you would have probably already needed a website by now), you most likely have neither the funds nor skills to fork over thousands to a professional for the perfect site. Thankfully, in today's sea of freelancers, entrepreneurs, and independent contractors, a lack of money and programming knowledge does not stand in the way of a great-looking site that does not break the bank.