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  • Are We Ready for a World Without Resumes?

    Updating resumes and writing cover letters can feel like an insurmountable obstacle in the job hunting process, even when you're desperate for a new gig. For one thing, it's hard to see typos or inconsistencies once they've been introduced, making the process dull at best and frustrating at worst; for another, well, it feels weird to pitch yourself so openly. Wouldn't it be great if we didn't have to deal with resumes and cover letters at all?

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  • How to Look for a Job When You Have a Job

    The best time to look for a new job might be when you're already employed, but that doesn't mean it's easy to manage the process when you already have a full plate. Here's how to find a new gig without getting fired from your old one.

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  • Avoid These 8 Resume Fails [infographic]

    Recruiters spend an average of six seconds looking at your resume. Sadly, this seems to be long enough to catch even the tiniest typo, but not long enough to unearth the relevant experience you modestly placed in paragraph two.

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  • 3 Ways to Get Ahead at Work

    The economy may be recovering, but that doesn't mean that workers are swimming in raises and promotions. If you want to move forward in your career, you'll have to get creative and make opportunities for yourself. Here are a few things to do, daily, weekly, and monthly, to build professional relationships and lay the foundation for a better career.

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  • 3 Steps to Close Your Personal Skills Gap

    Conversation about the skills gap tends to run on a broad scale: employers want X, workers only offer Y. But what about if you're one of the workers? Your first goal, then, isn't to solve the world's problems, but to fill in your own skills gap and get hired. Here's how.
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  • Avoid These 7 Interview Mistakes

    Want to ace your next job interview? It's not just about doing the right things. What you don't do can be just as crucial to getting hired.

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  • Make Your Twitter Bio Help You Get the Job

    It's hard to sum up the whole of your experience, skills, and passions in a single-page resume. Shorten that to 160 characters, and you have two things: your Twitter bio and a writing exercise that's probably more challenging than anything you've had to do since your last poetry unit in high school English class.

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  • Do These 5 Things Before Your Next Interview and Get the Job

    Interview prep is tricky not because you don't know what to do to get ready, but because you know too much about what you could do. Before you get bogged down in endless practice interview questions, make sure you have these things checked off your pre-interview to-do list.

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  • Is Your Resume Really Enough? What You Need to Get From Interview to Offer

    Most candidates dedicate the majority of their job search to their resume or LinkedIn profile, spending hours tweaking headlines, mission statements, and job summaries. But while your resume may be enough to get your foot in the door and land an interview, all that effort won’t help when it comes to showing your potential new employer how great you could be at the job.
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  • 3 Career Lessons From the OkCupid Human Experiments

    Christian Rudder, founder of OkCupid, recently admitted in a blog post that the dating site experiments on human beings. Before you envision the Bride of Frankenstein, or even Facebook's emotional manipulation studies, relax: OkCupid's experiments were a bit more lighthearted, not mention obvious, than the usual dark-side-of-data-science horror stories we've come to fear. Even better, they might teach us something about how people communicate online -- even if their goal is, say, getting a new job, rather than finding a mate.

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  • #PayChat: The Skills Gap

    There are many factors that contribute to the skills gap. The issue is complex. On the one hand, employers believe that educational institutions are not preparing students for careers in today’s work world. On the other hand, colleges and universities say that it is their job to teach students how to think and not to provide practical job training. Schools believe that many companies have cut back on job training due to budget restraints. Whose responsibility is it to ensure that recent graduates are prepared for today’s work world?
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  • Is It Possible to Have Too Many Skills?

    When you think about what might keep you from getting hired for your dream job, you probably never consider the possibility that your issue might be too many skills, instead of too few. But broad experience over a range of different areas can sometimes work against you in the eyes of a hiring manager.

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  • Interviewing for a Job? 4 Tips to Ensure That You Are Not Leaving Money on the Table

    At some point during your interview process, either at the initial screening or during the offer phase, you can expect to hear this question: “What are your salary expectations?” How you handle this question will decide what you earn, perhaps for years to come.
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  • Career Stalled? Here's How to Spin It in Job Interviews

    Switching employers every few years might be the way to make more money, but for many workers, the idea of taking a risk on a new job during a bad economy was just too scary. The problem, of course, is that few people work at the same place for our whole careers, retiring with a pension and a gold watch. Eventually, you're probably going to start looking for a new job, and when you do, you'll need to know how to make it clear that you're still a go-getter, despite riding out the recession in one place.

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  • How to Conduct a Sneaky Job Search at Work

    First things first: looking for a new job on the company's time is a bad idea. But sometimes, life intervenes -- for instance, if you work 14 hours a day, and most weekends, it can be hard to carve out time that's really "yours." So what do you do to minimize the risk of getting caught?

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  • 3 Ways to Get Out of a Career Rut

    Do you feel stuck in your job? Even if you're grateful to be gainfully employed, it's still hard to feel good about going off to work every day if you don't get the sense that you're moving forward. If you've been idling in one place for a while, here's how to kick your career back into gear.

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  • Headhunters Are Judging Your Grammar and Usage

    At first glance, it seems unfair: no one would expect an editor to build a website in order to prove that she has the chops to catch stray commas, but woe betide the software developer who submits a resume with a typo in it. In this era of instantaneous results and 24/7 availability, is it really reasonable for hiring managers to expect perfection in terms of punctuation, spelling, and so on?

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  • Getting Hired: 6 Mental Makeovers for the Class of 2015

    Get ready for the real world, class of 2015. College is a supportive haven with lots of safety nets and a focus on individual achievement, but the workplace has different rules. You’re going to have to prove you can be fearless and independent, but also willing to share your success. Here's how to change your thinking.
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  • Stop Doing These 3 Toxic Things at Work

    Some work behavior is poisonous to your career. Do certain things and act in certain ways, and you'll not only tank your own chances at promotion -- you'll destroy the productivity and job satisfaction of those around you, as well. Here's what you need to stop doing, right away, to get ahead without destroying your social capital with your colleagues.

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  • Is It OK to Ask About Salary in a Job Interview?

    The conventional wisdom is that it's in a candidate's best interest to delay the salary discussion for as long as they can, both to gather information on the position and its duties and to encourage the hiring manager to throw out the first number. A recent survey from staffing services provider Robert Half, however, indicates that 31 percent of managers are comfortable with applicants asking about compensation and benefits in the very first interview. A further 38 percent say that it's OK on interview number two, and 9 percent will even accept it during the phone screen.

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