• PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! My Co-Worker Stole All the Good Vacation Days
    If you're interested in work-life balance issues, you've probably read your fair share of articles exhorting you to live in the moment and be here now and so on. There's just one problem: professional life demands that we live in the moment, and also live in next week, and also in six months from now. Take, for example, the problem of planning vacation time. To get it approved and not irritate your co-workers, you have to submit your request for summer fun while snow's still on the ground. Of course, even if you do that, there's no guarantee that you'll get what you asked for. For instance, your evil co-worker might get in ahead of you and scoop up all the good days. In this week's roundup, we look at advice for coping with that situation, plus job search tools you're probably overlooking, and how to grow your professional network without ignoring your personal life.
  • 5 Signs That You're Interviewing for a Bad Job
    All of us, at one point in our life, have interviewed for a bad job. You know that gut-sinking feeling you get when you realize 10 seconds into the interview that this job definitely isn't a good fit for you. You ultimately leave with nothing but wasted time and a bad taste in your mouth. To avoid taking a job you'll regret, and to save yourself some time, take note of these dead giveaways that the gig you're interviewing for might be a bad job.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Does Your Cover Letter Make You Sound Like a Robot?
    Strange as it might seem to most of us, there are people out there who love various parts of the job search process. Some like meeting new people, or feel energized by the interview process; others see exciting new potential in every networking connection or job posting. But even those job-searching Pollyannas would be hard-pressed to find an upside to one part of the process: writing a cover letter that grabs readers' attention, expresses their qualifications, and doesn't mindlessly repeat the same material as their resume. In this week's roundup, we look at one expert's advice on writing a cover letter that reads as if it's written by a human, plus a few reasons why your job hunt is stalled, and tips to make your resume stand out ... even when the hiring manager only takes eight seconds to skim it.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do I Have to Disclose That I Was Fired?
    Even if you're the best employee in the history of paid work, you might get fired at some point in your career. Sometimes, it's no one's fault: you turned out to be a bad fit for the role and vice versa. Other times, you might have made a mistake, and paid a steep price for it. But the worst scenario is the one that's not your fault at all – but that still potentially haunts your job search afterward. In this week's round-up, we look at what one career expert advises job seekers who've been fired, plus how to repair a damaged professional relationship and how to give tough feedback.
  • Could These Be the 5 Most Bizarre Job Interview Questions?
    Job interview questions should have only one purpose, and that's to figure out whether or not the candidate is a good fit. Unfortunately, some hiring managers didn't get that particular memo, and take interview questions – particularly behavioral ones – to ridiculous extremes. Think less "Tell me about a time you faced a challenge at work" and more "If you were any object in a kitchen what would you be and why?" Sure, sometimes these questions are a creative way of digging out the interviewee's best and worst qualities, but other times, they're just plain strange. You'd be forgiven for wondering, on the applicant side of the table, if the hiring manager was just messing with you.
  • 5 Ways to Spring-Clean Your Career
    Many cultures have a tradition of cleaning house in the spring. That just makes sense: spring is a time of visible new beginnings, in the form of budding flowers and longer days, and for a lot of us, it's the first time in months we've had the energy to contemplate doing more than the bare minimum. If you've been feeling stuck in your career, spring is also the perfect time to dust off your resume and start honing your skills. You could be in a totally different place, professionally, by the time winter rolls round again.
  • There's a New Type of Pay Gap: The Height and Weight Gap
    As if gender wasn't a shallow-enough reason for the persistent wage gap, a new study found that height and weight have been added to the mix, too. More specifically, if you're a short male or an overweight female, then you can bet that you earn less than your taller, thinner colleagues. Here's what you need to know.
  • 5 Ways to Avoid Answering the Worst Job Interview Question, 'What's Your Salary History?'
    First things first: anyone who tells you that you can always dodge the salary history question is probably trying to sell you something. The reality of the situation is that sometimes, you just can't wriggle out of answering this question – not if you want to stay a viable candidate for the job. But, that doesn't mean that you should name your price right away. You might be able to get the hiring manager to focus on the future, not the past, and that's what you're hoping for.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do You Feel Trapped in Your Career?
    The average person changes jobs 10 to 15 times over the course of their career, and spends less than five years at each job. Harder to figure out: how many times they change careers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn't track it, and many changes are pretty subtle anyway, as career paths naturally evolve over time. Sometimes, however, you have to make a leap. In this week's roundup, we look at what to do when you need to make a big career change, plus resume rules you should stop breaking, and ways to beat burnout.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What to Ask Instead of 'What Do You Do?'
    What's the worst part about networking? All the horrifyingly dull questions you have to ask and answer, in order to establish new relationships with your fellow humans. But, there's no law that says we have to stick to the same old, same old. Mixing things up might actually get some better answers, build stronger connections, and bore everyone a lot less. In this week's roundup, we look at 27 questions to ask instead of "What do you do?," plus the housekeeping questions you must ask at your next job interview, and the best ways to get motivated when you're feeling uninspired.
  • Unemployed? The Voice of Job Seekers Is Here to Help
    If you do a quick Google search for "career consultant," you can easily end up in a digital swamp of information overload. If you're unemployed and find yourself in this position, look no further than Mark Dyson – a.k.a., "The Voice of Job Seekers." Here's the skinny on Mark, and how he can help you in your job search.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: The Evil HR Lady Explains, 'Why I Threw Out Your Resume'
    If you've been interviewing for a while, and not getting anywhere – not even to the first phone screen – the problem might be that your resume isn't making the first cut. In this week's roundup, we look at advice on how to fix that, plus a better way to say "I'm passionate" in a job market full of passionate job seekers, and the seven critical skills you're probably leaving off your resume.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Update Your LinkedIn Profile (Without Tipping Off the Boss)
    Keeping a job search secret is more complicated these days than not getting busted looking at a job search site on the company time. Part of the problem is that personal brand is so important for job seekers; to show hiring managers and recruiters what you have to offer, you have to keep on top of your social media presence. Of course, nothing tells an employer that you're looking like a freshly updated LinkedIn. So how can you keep your profiles fresh, without making things awkward with your current boss? This week's roundup looks at ways to manage that, plus how to handle rejection during a job search and how to deal with arguably the worst thing about working as a team.
  • How Samantha Bee Got Such a Diverse Writing Staff
    The latest entry into the late-night talk show ring is none other than Daily Show alum Samantha Bee and her new show, Full Frontal. She's a remarkable newcomer for a few reasons. First, she's a woman in a sea of dudes behind desks (a literal representation of this was recently published by Vanity Fair). Secondly, she's created a writing staff that is atypical for comedy staffs — it's 50 percent female and 30 percent nonwhite. So how did she manage that? The answers could surprise you.
  • 4 Red Flags to Look Out For in Your Next Interview
    Although it doesn't always feel this way, job interviews are a two-way street. When you're interviewing for a job, it's not just about what the company thinks about you – it's also how you feel about the company. A good cultural fit can mean the difference between skipping off to work with a song in your heart and dragging yourself to the office like you're headed to the DMV. Not a seasoned interviewer? Never fear. You can learn to recognize the red flags that indicate this job isn't for you – during the interview process and before you take that job offer.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Beat the Resume Robots and Get Hired
    Before your resume ever reaches human eyes, it has to make it through the Applicant Tracking System, the software program that scans your CV and decides whether you make it to the people part of the hiring process. Understanding how these Applicant Tracking Systems work might mean the difference between getting that first interview and twiddling your thumbs while your resume languishes in the depths of a database. In this week's roundup, we get an inside look at these resume robots, plus learn about time management personality types and find out one reason why your last meeting was a bust.
  • Is It Ever OK to Tell the Boss You're Looking for a New Job?
    The employee/boss relationship is a tricky thing to nail down. You might think that everything's friendly, but things could change on a dime once you announce that you've got one foot out the door. What should you do to keep that friendly vibe going (and ensure you get a good recommendation in the end)? Think about it, before you blab to your boss that you're outtie-5000.
  • Plan Your Interview 'Go Bag'
    Getting word that you have an interview is an exciting thing ... so much so that you might just lose your head a bit. What you need to do is be prepared, so that if an interview comes up at a moment's notice, all you have to do is grab your "interview go bag" and it'll have everything that you need to make a great impression and get that job.
  • Plunging Into Personal Websites: Do's, Don'ts, and General Guidance
    I can still recall the feeling of accomplishment the day I completed my first resume. It was similar to what I imagine Sir Edmund Hillary felt when reaching the top of Everest. I was done! I might as well have carved it into stone. Then reality struck me across the face, just like the northerly winds at the top of the world must have done to Sir Hillary. Life is not static, and neither are our resumes.
  • What Not to Do in an Interview
    Every time you get an interview, it seems like you have no idea how to go about it. You fuss over what to wear, what to say, even what to eat that morning. When you seek out advice, you get all manner of opinions, and often they conflict with each other. So where you do start? First of all, focus on what not to do.

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