• 5 Ways HR Can Make Your Life Better
    Many workers spend the bulk of their career trying to avoid dealing with human resources, seeing it as a combination principal's office/courtroom. That's too bad, because there's a lot that HR can do to better your career, provided that you know how to use this function correctly.
  • Choose Your Company Culture Wisely
    Corporate culture affects employee behavior. This goes far beyond working hard to get something turned in because your boss wants it yesterday. People's ethical and personal decisions are based in part upon the values of the organization that employs them. Therefore, consider the culture of a company before you accept a job.
  • Adult Dancers Receive $10M Settlement in Minimum Wage Class Action Suit
    Every state has different wage laws. Some have substantially higher minimum wages than the federal minimum wage, while others do not. Some states allow employers to pay tipped employees less than the normal minimum wage, while others do not. But a recent case involving New York City adult dancers points out that one thing employers cannot do anywhere: force someone to work exclusively for tips and refuse to pay him or her any wage at all.
  • What Can Managers Do to Address Workplace Bullying?
    According to a 2011 survey by the Society for Human Resource Management, 51 percent of organizations surveyed reported that there had been incidents of bullying in their workplace. In addition to creating a hostile work environment, bullying affects both victims and witnesses, contributing to continued absences, poor health, self-esteem issues, stress, trauma, and depression -- of which makes it harder for people to do their best work. Here's how you, as a manager, can prevent bullying and make your office a healthier, happier environment.
  • 15 Things Working Moms Who Breastfeed Have to Think About (and 4 Tips to Make It Easier)
    Returning to work post-baby poses more problems than a newbie mother might anticipate, especially if she chooses to continue breastfeeding. Here are some tips to help pumping at work not be such a dump.
  • 5 Reasons to Start a Book Club at Work

    We know a lot about our co-workers: what they like to eat and drink, what music they’re into, and what they like to read. In fact, these interests often become the basis of our workplace conversations. Maker of trendy eyewear Warby Parker noted a shared passion for reading amongst employees and decided to make book clubs an official component of the company’s culture. It’s been a win for everyone involved. Here’s why.

  • At Some Companies, Too Many Chances to Fix Bad Behavior
    Do you work with the employee from hell? Some company policies enable bad behavior by putting off consequences. Understand what is going on with management and learn to survive working with your toxic co-worker.
  • 4 Ways to Handle Your Passive-Aggressive Boss
    Passive-aggression is difficult to deal with under any circumstances, but at work, it's a potential career killer -- especially if the passive-aggressive person in question is your boss. The worst part is, it's not always easy to tell when your manager is guilty of this destructive behavior; on the outside, he might seem sweet and easy to work with. Here's how to spot the tell-tale signs and cope with the situation effectively.
  • 3 Questions to Sniff Out Toxic Work Environment Before You Accept the Job
    You really want the job and it seems like a good move for your career. But how can you tell if you'll like the job, once you take it? There are a few questions you can ask during your interview that will help you spot a toxic work environment, before you get stuck in it.
  • 5 Reasons Why Annual Performance Reviews Should Be Banished, Adobe-Style
    Rarely, if ever, does any manager or employee speak of their fondness for the annual performance review, that ritual outlining of personal mistakes, successes, strengths, and weaknesses. So, if everyone hates them so much, why are are we doing them? That's the question Adobe asked before deciding to eliminate the process in 2012, and the company hasn't looked back since. Here's why.
  • Would You Miss HR, If Your Company Got Rid of It?

    Human resources gets a lot of flak from other departments in the company. Much of the good they do (administering benefits, for example) is invisible, while their less enjoyable duties (handing out pink slips) are right out in the open for all to see. Recently, a few companies have done away with HR altogether, replacing some functions with software that automates payroll and benefits, etc. But are workers really better off without an HR department?

  • Is a Career in Positive Psychology Right for You?
    Positive psychology, the study of what makes life worth living, is one of the newest branches of the social sciences. According to positive psychology, we have the ability to create and determine happiness, which is a thing in itself, and not just the absence of depression. Sound empowering? Positive psychology is making its way into corporate environments, which is good news if you're a worker of any sort, or interested in getting involved in a career using positive psychology in the workplace.
  • When Can I Go to HR?

    When Can I Go to HR?
    Many employees dread going to Human Resources, seeing it either as an extension of their boss's authority or as a cost-center that takes away healthy productive time from employees for conducting training or surveys. As a result, a lot of employees are unclear on when and why they should reach out to HR.
  • 3 Ways to Manage Your Difficult Boss

    Americans who work full-time may spend more time interacting with co-workers and managers than with their own family and friends. Their relationships at work, however, are far different than with trusted friends. When bosses are difficult people, workers often do not have the freedom to confront them or to demand to be treated with common courtesy. For those employees who are not lucky enough to work for polite people, these three strategies may help them maintain their sanity.

  • The Ultimate Guide to Getting Hired Through Social Media [infographic]
    Landing a job takes more than a decent resume – it also takes a bit of creativity to get noticed, and social media enables candidates to do just that. We’ll take a look at one of the most comprehensive guides available to show you how to successfully use social networks to land that dream career.
  • 10 Popular Twitter Hashtags for Job Seekers to Follow
    Hiring managers are beginning to veer away from conventional methods of advertising job vacancies, and they are, instead, turning to social media to locate qualified candidates. Their weapon of choice? A little thing known as a hashtag. See how hashtags are a candidate’s best friend when it comes to finding a job in today’s digital age.
  • 3 Things Employers Won't Tell You About Social Media
    By now, we've all heard stories about people being fired for their social media use, either because they got caught tweeting on the company time, or because they said something outside of work, that tarnished their employer's brand. But there's more to the perils of social media than just saying the wrong thing at the wrong time. Here's what your employer knows about social media that might surprise you.
  • How to Interview for a Job When You’re Not Exactly Qualified
    Sometimes, your dream job is the one that just slightly above your current qualifications, but that doesn't mean that you shouldn't go after it. Here are four tips to help you navigate past any possible inadequacies of your candidacy and land the gig.
  • Should Workplace Bullying Be Illegal?

    A great quote from a practicing lawyer is, "It is not illegal to be an unlikeable jerk." In Australia, newly crafted workplace bullying laws might just limit some jerkiness. The United State of America does not currently address workplace bullying, determine whether the behavior itself is illegal, or provide any sanctions or penalties. Should we?

  • Why Being a Whistle-blowing Employee Is a Good Thing
    Many employees are discouraged to voice their concerns in the workplace, especially those that are not in managerial or upper-level positions. However, we’ll take a look at how speaking up can actually make you a valuable asset to your employer.