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  • 3 Career Lessons From Hello Kitty
    Hello Kitty brings in 75 percent of Sanrio's annual $142 million profits, according to analysts, and she's cute as a button, to boot. But even with fame, wealth, and looks, Hello Kitty might not strike you as a model for your own career. (Unless you're Mariah Carey.) Here's what Sanrio's most popular character can teach you:
  • 4 Good Jobs that Don't Require a 4-Year Degree
    It's difficult to make good money without a college degree, and research shows that the gap is widening. According to Labor Department statistics, Americans with a four-year degree earn about 98 percent more per hour than those without one.
  • Want a 'Good' Job? Go to College
    According to a study conducted by Georgetown University, the job market is recovering, at least as far as low-paying and high-paying jobs are concerned. Between 2010 and 2014, the economy created 6.6 million jobs, and 2.9 million "good" jobs — or those that are defined by a median salary of $42,700 per year. The trouble is: 98 percent of those good jobs went to workers who earned at least a bachelor's degree.
  • The Worst Cases of Resume Fakery Hiring Managers Have Ever Seen
    In this job market, a lot of people might feel tempted to exaggerate their experience or credentials on their resumes in order to get ahead. But, lying on your resume is a bad idea – a very bad idea. You'll likely get caught, as hiring managers will seek to verify your claims. Even if by some miracle your lie slips past them, you'll reveal the truth when you start to do the job and your skill set doesn't line up the way it should. No matter how you cut it, outright lying on your resume is not recommended – but that doesn't stop people from trying.
  • Erase These Words From Your LinkedIn Profile Right Now
    We all want to stand out. With more than 100 people on average applying to every job listing out there, it can be hard to make your on-par job skills and drive translate into much more than "I'm the ideal candidate. No, seriously. I'm perfect for this." The problem might be that you're trying too hard to have the perfect profile. In fact, it's so perfect, everyone's saying the exact same thing.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! My Helicopter Parents Might Sabotage My Career
    Today's parents are pretty involved in their children's lives – often to a degree that seems excessive to those of us who grew up (or raised kids) in the '70s and '80s and were lucky if we knew we knew what a seatbelt was and that cheese didn't naturally form in pre-packaged single slices. Unfortunately, some of these helicopter parents don't let go once their kids graduate and join the work world. In this week's roundup, we hear from one such adult child, plus get some tips on what recruiters want to see on your resume and how to free yourself from negativity.
  • Your Cover Letter Might Be Costing You the Job
    Composing cover letters may be one of the most arduous aspects of applying for work, but it seems that they remain a necessary evil. The purpose of the cover letter is to introduce yourself to an organization in the context of the specific job to which you're applying. Cover letters are pointedly aimed toward each potential opportunity, whereas the rest of your application package might be similar to what you use for other job openings. A cover letter can make or break your application, so it's important to avoid certain common pitfalls in order to maximize its benefits.
  • Why People Quit Their Dream Jobs
    With an insanely competitive interview process that can take four to six weeks, include up to eight rounds of interviews, and require responses to seemingly irrelevant questions such as, "How many trees are there in Washington state?," jobs at Amazon and other top tech employers are hard to get. The thought of someone who actually managed to snag a coveted spot with a dream company voluntarily choosing to relinquish said position might sound unfathomable. And yet many people do exactly that.
  • How to Answer the Question, 'What's Your Greatest Weakness?'
    After you've experienced even just a few job interviews, you have a basic idea of what to expect when you sit down across from a potential employer. You'll have a few minutes of small talk, then they'll ask you some questions about your experience and how it applies to the job you're interviewing for. And, at some point in the process, they'll hit you with some version of the familiar question: "What's your greatest weakness?"
  • 10 Things to Do When You Get the Silent Treatment After a Job Interview
    Job interviews can be a lot like blind dates. You walk out of an awesome date thinking that this person is THE one. You've never felt more confident about anything in your life. Then, a couple of days turns into a week without you hearing back from that person, and you find yourself in a dumbfounded, anxiety-ridden tailspin, because you swore it was meant to be. The only thing you can do now is regain composure and figure out how to make sense of all this. Here are a few things to consider so that you can move on from this situation with more confidence and clarity, regardless of the outcome.
  • More Summer Jobs for Teens, But Do They Want Them?
    The impact of the Great Recession was far-reaching. Although the economy has started to improve in recent years, things aren't the way they used to be. This is true for teens as well as adults. The teen labor force is a complicated matter, with a lot of different factors contributing to the current summer employment reality. Let's take a closer look at a few facts pertaining to summer jobs for teens in 2015.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: The Case of the Singing Employee
    What's the weirdest thing you've ever seen at the office? For one manager, it's probably the time a report pulled out a harmonica and started singing his status update. The question, of course: is that OK? And if not, how exactly do you tell your subordinate that this is not the opera episode of Mr. Rogers? All that, plus avoiding student mistakes, and how to accept a job offer the right way, in this week's roundup.
  • Bored or Broke in Retirement? These Part-Time Jobs Might Be for You
    A few weeks ago, I wrote about how retirees have more education debt than ever. For some, the simple solution is to pay down what you can with your monthly allowance and leave the rest to liquid assets. But for the more determined folk who've left the workforce, coming up with more money after retirement might mean going back to work — at least, part-time.
  • The Most Appealing Employers, According to Millennials
    Where do millennials want to work? As a part of a six-part series on millennials, Universum, a global research and advisory firm which specializes in employer branding, offered up some data about employers as they are perceived by the group that has become the largest generation in the U.S. labor force.
  • Do These 3 Things and Land the Job of Your Dreams
    Knowing what you want to do with your life is one thing, but knowing how to clearly and effectively articulate that to a potential employer is a whole other ball game. If you're looking for some quick and dirty tips on how to knock it out of the park the next time someone asks you what you want to be "when you grow up," then hang tight, because this checklist will help you go from a dime a dozen to one in a million just in the nick of time.
  • Don't Forget About Apprenticeships: Learn While You Earn
    While not everyone wants to work, because most people have to, it logically follows that most of us want a job. The real question is, what's the best way to get one? If you can't afford four years of college, but want a skilled job that pays more than minimum wage, an apprenticeship might be for you.
  • Looking for a Summer Job? These Companies Still Have Openings
    Between finals, graduations, and the unexpected madness of life, you weren't able to take the time to find a summer job. Now it's July, and you're in a bit of a panic trying to figure out what to do. Well, fear not. There are still jobs out there for the summer, and one might just have your name on it.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do I Get Paid Extra for Working on the Holiday?
    If you're headed into work this weekend instead of hanging around a barbecue, waiting for the fireworks to start, you're probably already a little annoyed. If you're not getting paid extra for it, you might even upgrade annoyed to downright mad. In this week's roundup, we look at expert advice on determining whether you're likely to get paid more for working holidays – plus, insight on goal-setting and how to redeem a job interview, once it starts going horribly wrong.
  • How to Tell If It's Time to Switch Careers
    Are you contemplating whether now's the right time to switch careers? If so, then you should know that there's a right way to change careers, and a wrong way. Here's what you need to know to ensure that you are well prepared to make a seamless transition into your new dream career, sooner than later.
  • No Job Yet? Do This

    No Job Yet? Do This
    Starting to panic because you have finished college or your training program, but you don't have a job yet? As time passes, you're likely to start feeling like everybody else has already been hired, so it's natural for worry to set in. What should you do? What should you not do?