• PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Are You Sending Your Resume Into a Black Hole?
    Many employers rely on Applicant Tracking Systems to vet resumes, long before your information ever reaches human eyes. In a perfect world, this would be productive for all involved – employers could save time sifting through resumes, and you could be assured that your excellent qualifications made it through to impress a hiring manager. The real world, however, is different. In this week's roundup, we look at how to use keywords to make sure your resume makes the cut, plus the decisions you'll always regret making at work, and the 15 things to take off your resume, starting today.
  • The 5 Best Cities to Start a Career
    If you're just getting started with your career, you have a lot of decisions to make. The process of deciding what you'd like to do and how to do it can be tricky. It's important to keep in mind throughout this process that not all areas of the country are the same when it comes to starting a career. For this reason, the folks at WalletHub recently released a new report that analyzes, across 17 metrics, the best and worst cities to start a career among the 150 most populated cities in the United States. Let's take a look at the five cities that topped the list.
  • Do Smokers Have a Harder Time Finding Jobs?
    People who smoke don't do it because they think it's healthy. Actually, they are all too aware of the risks that come along with smoking cigarettes, and they know how much the addiction is costing them on a practical and monetary level, too. It's just that quitting smoking can be a really difficult thing to do. Addictions are powerful.
  • LinkedIn Offers App For Students
    LinkedIn can be a useful professional networking tool, and who needs such a service more than recent college graduates? However, students have unique needs that haven't always been addressed through the site. For this reason, LinkedIn recently released a new app geared specifically toward students. Here's what you need to know.
  • 4 Jobs Where You Get to Play With Toys
    How many times have you sat at your desk, bored to tears, creating toys out of any object in reach? Do you daydream of leaving your work behind and going back to the creative days of childhood? When you visit your parents for the holidays, are you volunteering to watch your niece or nephew as an excuse to play with your old LEGO set? All this may be calling you back to the dream career you never knew existed: playing with toys full-time.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Should You Ever Take a Low-Ball Salary Offer?
    You know you should negotiate salary, but sometimes it's hard to act on what you know. Other times, you do your best to drive up the offer, to no avail: it's either take the gig, and deal with the low pay, or stay put. (And if you're unemployed, that can be a particularly difficult option to contemplate.) This week's roundup looks at what one expert says about taking lower offers, plus how to tell when it's time to look for a new job, and a few hints that the hiring manager probably won't be extending a job offer.
  • 6 Important Facts About Women and Salary Negotiation
    Why do women earn less money than men – and how much less do they really make? When it comes to the gender pay gap, nothing is off-limits for debate. In particular, critics who say that the gender pay gap is much smaller than 77 cents on the dollar argue that women's choice has a lot to do with why they earn less than men. They claim that women's lower earnings is not so much a pay gap, but a wage gap – and if women don't negotiate salary, for instance, then why worry about their lower earnings?
  • Employers Are Looking at Your Social Media
    If you grew up with social media, then your parents and teachers warned you throughout your life about the damage you can do to your reputation online. But, will prospective employers really check your profiles while evaluating you for a job? The latest research says: probably. In fact, the number of employers who look at candidates' social media has increased 500 percent in the past 10 years, according to one survey.
  • The Best (and Worst) Entry-Level Jobs
    One of the most pervasive jokes about job hunting in pop culture today is the classic posting, "Entry-Level Job: 3-5 Years Experience Necessary." Of course, not all entry-level jobs are created equal. Some occupations fare better than others in terms of opportunity, starting salary, and potential for growth.
  • Coders Are Actually Getting Agents Now
    With the NFL draft behind us, it may be tempting for recent college grads to pine for what could have been in a career as a pro athlete: the salary is amazing, for one thing, and you get to live out a life-long dream as a star of American culture. But with the competitive nature of such a job, there's a lot at work behind the scenes that we probably don't understand. Now, for some in Silicon Valley, the job hunt is starting to look a little more like the path of a pro athlete.
  • The 5 Worst States for Teachers
    Whether you're new to the profession, or a master veteran to the science/art, you probably know that teaching is a very difficult job. The curriculum, rules and regulations, and "best practices" are ever-changing so you can never get too comfortable. The money isn't great – to say the least. Not to mention that, on any given day, the work itself is seemingly endless, very difficult, and largely underappreciated (and/or misunderstood) by society at large.
  • The 5 Best States for Teachers
    Teaching is difficult work. However, some factors (such as compensation and teacher/student ratio) can make a big difference. Every year, WalletHub examines all 50 states plus the District of Columbia using 13 metrics in order to determine the best and worst states for teachers.
  • Here's How Switching Jobs Can Really Cost You
    Are things starting to feel stale at the office? If you're feeling unfulfilled in your work and daydreaming about different companies, you're not alone. According to Gallup, 51 percent of currently employed Americans are considering a new job. But before you send in your two weeks' — or even call a recruiter — you should weigh the downsides of leaving that desk. They may surprise you.
  • How to Tweet for the Queen (or Any Other Celebrity)
    Nearly three in five millennials have a Twitter account. While the company may have reported less-than-stellar numbers in the last quarter, it's certainly a brand that Americans in 2016 are quite familiar with. And even if you aren't among of the scores of active users, some interesting new job opportunities may convince you to get familiar with the social media platform, namely: you could be tweeting for the Queen of England.
  • Business Professors, Their Students, and Narcissism: What You Need to Know
    Narcissistic Personality Disorder is no joke, and it's not just about vanity and self-absorption, as a cursory understanding of its mythological namesake might suggest. Instead, it's a serious pathology that manifests in about six percent of the general population. It is more common in men, and the most extreme symptoms tend to be exhibited during a person's 40s and 50s.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Does Your Cover Letter Make You Sound Like a Robot?
    Strange as it might seem to most of us, there are people out there who love various parts of the job search process. Some like meeting new people, or feel energized by the interview process; others see exciting new potential in every networking connection or job posting. But even those job-searching Pollyannas would be hard-pressed to find an upside to one part of the process: writing a cover letter that grabs readers' attention, expresses their qualifications, and doesn't mindlessly repeat the same material as their resume. In this week's roundup, we look at one expert's advice on writing a cover letter that reads as if it's written by a human, plus a few reasons why your job hunt is stalled, and tips to make your resume stand out ... even when the hiring manager only takes eight seconds to skim it.
  • 5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Leaving Your Company
    Although it's something of a myth that Americans change jobs more than they used to, we do tend to move around quite a bit. In 2012, the average job tenure was just 4.6 years (keep in mind though that it was 3.7 years in 2002 and just 3.5 years in 1983). But, even though taking a new position and leaving an old one behind is a pretty common thing to do, it's not an action you should take too lightly, particularly if you're not just changing positions but actually leaving your organization. So, before you make your final decision and officially announce that you're moving on, ask yourself these questions.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do I Have to Disclose That I Was Fired?
    Even if you're the best employee in the history of paid work, you might get fired at some point in your career. Sometimes, it's no one's fault: you turned out to be a bad fit for the role and vice versa. Other times, you might have made a mistake, and paid a steep price for it. But the worst scenario is the one that's not your fault at all – but that still potentially haunts your job search afterward. In this week's round-up, we look at what one career expert advises job seekers who've been fired, plus how to repair a damaged professional relationship and how to give tough feedback.
  • 4 Great Benefits of Having a Side Job
    In a perfect world, we would only take on side jobs because we really wanted to. Unfortunately, wage stagnation means that many workers take on side jobs (or even second full-time positions) in order to make ends meet. Working too many hours is never recommended, but side jobs can have their benefits (assuming you still have some downtime in your schedule). Let's take a look at some of pluses.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Master the Sneaky Job Hunt
    The best time to look for a job might well be when you have a job, but that doesn't mean it's easy to engage in a lengthy interview process while you're still employed. This week's roundup looks at ways to do that without tipping off the boss – or at least, without alienating him or her. Also in the roundup: the never-fail job search tips you're probably ignoring, and ways to include testimonials on your resume, so there's no way hiring managers can miss how impressive you are.

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