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  • What Does 'Job Meaning' Mean, Anyway?
    PayScale's latest report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, looks at which occupations are described by workers as making the world a better place. The jobs that make the list probably won't come as a surprise – surgeon is on there, as is English teacher and clergy member – but that doesn't mean that every high-meaning job looks exactly the same.
  • The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs
    Does your job make the world a better place? Some professions are more likely to answer "yes" to that question than others – and which ones might surprise you. PayScale's report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, looks at which occupations have high meaning, and which make workers feel like their job is hurting the world more than helping. If you're thinking about changing careers, or just want to see how your job stacks up, this report is for you.
  • The 5 Best Jobs for College Students
    Attending college is astronomically expensive. Gone are the days when you could work part-time and over the summers, and come away with enough money to float your tuition and fees out-of-pocket. Still, even if you're paying for your education with loans and grants, extra money comes in handy when you're in school. The challenge is to find jobs that line your pockets without interfering with your studies. As part of PayScale's data report, The Best Jobs for You, we looked at a few of the best part-time jobs for people who don't yet have a degree, but are working toward one.
  • The 5 Best Jobs for Working Parents
    Being a working parent was hard enough in the olden days, before mobile technology stretched office workers' days from 9 to 5 to 24/7. For many people who struggle to balance family commitments and professional responsibilities, even a workday that allowed them to leave the office and continue toiling online from home would be a refreshing change – but corporate cultures often demand face-time as well as productivity, leaving workers who'd like to see their kids out in the cold.
  • The 5 Best Jobs for Do-Gooders
    First things first: not everyone needs saving the world to be part of their job description, and that's 100 percent OK. For some people, giving back happens on the weekends, or after work, and the office is just the place where they earn a paycheck. For others, however, no job could be truly rewarding – well-compensated or not – without the feeling that the work they do helps others. As part of PayScale's data package, Best Jobs for You, we included a special section just for these folks.
  • Interactive Map: What's the Most Common Uncommon Job in Your State?
    The most popular jobs in a given geographic area are usually pretty unsurprising, including titles like cashier, waitstaff, and customer service representative. It's not that there's anything wrong with these jobs; it's just that their very commonness means that you're used to hearing about them. But, what about the unusual jobs that are more common in one place than another – the helicopter pilots and professional gardeners and amusement park attendants? Those are the gigs PayScale looked at in a section of its latest data package on the best jobs for you. If you want a job that's common where you live, but uncommon anywhere else, start with this map.
  • How the Hazards of 'Clopening' Affect You
    "Clopening" is the newest trend in the service industry. In order to shave costs by relying on fewer employees, many employers are scheduling the same person to close up a restaurant at midnight, only to return in seven hours to open. Clopening exists in more industries than just hospitality: retail, security, construction, and nursing are using the practice, as well. The harsh consequences of clopening affect more than just the weary service worker; they affect us all in detrimental ways.
  • Here Is the Most Popular Job in Your Income Bracket
    Every passing year brings us to greater heights of creativity when it comes to job titles, but for every chief chatter and beverage dissemination officer, you'll still meet many more managers, nursing aides, and lawyers.
  • Low Stress, High Pay? These 3 Low-Pressure Jobs Can Pay $70k or More per Year

    It's common to think of stress and pay as a tradeoff. For example, surgeons and air traffic controllers pull down the big bucks because their work is not only beneficial to society, but potentially tough on the cortisol levels of the job-holder. We don't care how good you are at managing stress: if your job involves rebuilding the human body or landing several tons of steel and jet fuel, you're going to feel the pressure. But not every high-paying gig demands such sacrifices.

  • Top 10 Careers of the Future [infographic]

    When you think about futuristic jobs, you probably think of something along the lines of robot scientist (which could mean either a scientist who builds robots, or a scientist who is a robot -- either might apply). But the real jobs of the future probably look a bit more familiar.

  • 20 of the Happiest Jobs for New Grads

    In a tight job market and uncertain economic times, new graduates are often grateful for any job, whether it's one they enjoy or not. In order to help grads find a career they'll love, folks at CareerBliss, a site focused on searches and reviews of companies known for employee satisfaction, created a list of the happiest jobs for the class of 2014.

  • Doctors Are Miserable, and Here's Why
    It used to be prestigious to go to medical school. Doctors were almost guaranteed a good income and community respect. Today, it's a different story.
  • If More Women Do 'Male' Jobs, Will Pay Equalize?

    There are a lot of theories about why women still make less than men. Some experts hold that the problem is institutional sexism, others that women don't speak up enough and ask for what they want. PayScale's own report found that women are paid less, in part, because they choose work that gives back to society, instead of their own bottom line. The question, of course, is what we can do to reverse the trend, and compensate men, women -- and "male" and "female" professions -- fairly.

  • 5 Healthcare Jobs That Don't Require a 4-Year Degree

    Over half of the occupations expected to grow by 30 percent or more over the next decade are healthcare professions, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook. Even more significantly for folks without a lot of time or money to devote to retraining, some of them don't require a bachelor's degree for entry. A few are available to folks who only have a high school diploma.

  • Health Care Jobs Are Booming

    If you're shopping for a new career in 2014, you might want to consider a job in health care. These jobs are predicted lead the pack of highest growing occupations through 2022, according the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

  • Bad Medicine: 42 Percent of Med Students Say They Were Mistreated

    Is making big bucks as a doctor worth being treated poorly while you're in school?

  • 3 Unexpected Careers That Will Profit From Obamacare

    One of the major points of debate about the Affordable Care Act is whether it will lead to American workers losing their jobs. A recent poll showed that some small business owners have frozen hiring in anticipation of the now-delayed employer mandate, and the news is full of stories about retailers who cut employee hours down to 29.5 per week, to avoid benefit costs. So what's the good news?

  • What's Trending on Twitter? - Interviewing, Health Datapalooza, and Lululemon
    In this week's Twitter trending recap, we will discover a new method candidates can use during interviews to land their dream jobs, check in to one of the biggest health and medical conventions to see how one woman entrepreneur is paving a new path for other females in her industry, and discuss how Lululemon's pants recall cost them mega-millions and left them feeling a bit ... exposed. Find out how these three trending topics touch on issues that can help improve your everyday work experience.
  • Medical Assistant Salaries and Career Options

    Name: Michelle Francis
    Job Title: Medical Assistant
    Where: Walnut Creek, CA
    Years of Experience: 5
    Current Employer: Cardiovascular Consultants Medical Group
    Other Relevant Work Experience: CPR certified, BLS certified, Arrhythmia/EKG certificate
    Education: Concorde Career Institute, Medical Assisting, 4.0 GPA, perfect attendance
    Salary: Use the PayScale Research Center to find median medical assistant salary data.

    Medical Assistant Salaries and Career Options


    Medical assistants work in many health care settings and perform numerous duties while assisting providers, working with patients, and helping to keep a medical practice running smoothly. While there's no question that working in this field can sometimes be stressful, it's also true that medical assisting careers can be greatly rewarding. As Michelle Francis explains in the following interview, the typical medical assistant salary may not be huge, but being able to help patients - and sometimes family members - is worth a great deal.

  • What Is the Average Massage Therapist Salary?

    Name: Kelleen Blanchard
    Job Title: Massage Therapist
    Where: Seattle, WA
    Current Employer: Seattle Spa Noir
    Years of Experience: 3
    Other Relevant Work Experience: Customer Service
    Education: Brian Utting School of Massage; Cornish College of the Arts, BFA Theatre
    Salary: See the PayScale Research Center for the average massage therapist salary.

    What is the Average Massage Therapist Salary?


    There's no question that getting a professional massage can be a life-changing experience. Whether you're recovering from an injury or a stressful day at the office, massage therapy can be a huge help. But what is it like to work as a massage therapist? In this Salary Story, seattle massage therapist Kelleen Blanchard describes the ups and downs of her career as a massage therapist. She explains why she chose the profession, describes her daily tasks at Spa Noir, and offers advice to those just entering the field. If you're considering a career as a massage therapist, don't miss this invaluable interview. To find out more about the average massage therapist salary, see the links below.

    PayScale: What is your massage therapist job description?


    As a massage therapist at Spa Noir, I greet clients, review their intake forms for specific needs or medical issues and confer with them to customize the best, most beneficial therapy session. I am trained in deep tissue massage, Swedish massage, neuromuscular therapy and hot stone massage. I especially enjoy working with specific injuries and doing intense, deep tissue work because I have witnessed and experience the results from this kind of work. In addition to working one-on-one with clients, I help support the overall spa by doing laundry and other small cleaning tasks. I also am available for body wraps; eye and lip treatments; and foot, hand, and scalp treatments. These can be great relaxing add-ons to a massage. At the spa, my focus is on the client. I want their visit to be relaxing, positive, and to address their needs in a personal and effective manner.