• Waitresses Are the Most Sexually Harassed Occupation
    The restaurant industry has a unique business model. Rather than business owners budgeting to pay employees, restaurant owners depend upon customers "voluntarily" giving waitresses and waiters tips in return for "good service." That pay structure can lead to a dangerously imbalanced power dynamic between customer and waiter. No wonder, then, that a recent report from Restaurant Opportunities Center United found that two-thirds of female employees in the food service industry have been sexually harassed. In fact, 37 percent of Employment Opportunity Commission harassment claims come from women in the restaurant business.
  • Is There a Downside to a $15 an Hour Minimum Wage?

    The International Franchise Association has made defeating Seattle's $15 per hour minimum wage its "top policy fight," arguing that laws like these unfairly discriminate against franchisees, who will be lumped in with big businesses and forced to comply with the law by 2017, the earliest deadline of the staged roll-out. PayScale spoke via email with Chad Mackay, President and COO of El Gaucho, a high-end steakhouse chain based in Seattle, for his take on how the law could affect both businesses and workers.

  • The Future of Minimum Wage: More Money, But No More One-Size-Fits-All

    At the beginning of the month, Seattle's city council voted unanimously to increase the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour in stages over the next three to seven years. To get a business owner's perspective on the issue, we spoke via email with John Pepper, co-founder and former CEO of Boloco, a Boston-based restaurant chain with 22 units across New England. Pepper told us a bit about why a higher minimum wage isn't necessarily bad for business and what else needs to change for small businesses to thrive while paying their workers higher wages.

  • Low-Wage Workers Ask Employers to Voluntarily Raise Their Pay

    The fight to raise the minimum wage from the current federal mandate of $7.25 an hour to $10.10 has met with fierce opposition from Senate Republicans. Now, low-wage workers are taking matters into their own hands, asking their employers to commit to raising their pay without waiting to be legally required to do so.

  • Call to Slash Salary of the CEO of McDonald's
    Activist investment group Change to Win (CtW) is calling for the salary of McDonalds' CEO Donald Thompson to be slashed, due to the chain's poor performance as well as the gross inequity between CEO and worker pay. This is a good opportunity to discuss intra-company pay gaps as it affects all of us who work for a living.
  • Robots Won't Steal All the Jobs (But They Will Take Some)

    Since the early days of science fiction, man has worried that robots would eventually take their jobs. So far, the news seems to be mixed -- sometimes robots giveth jobs and sometimes they taketh them away. But certain low-paying occupations are more at risk for robotic replacement than others.

  • Stressed Across America [infographic]

    Stressful jobs are the same, no matter where you live. If you're a heart surgeon or an air traffic controller, you're going to be a little tense from time to time. But some cities have higher concentrations of certain stressful jobs. PayScale's latest infographic looks at these.

  • Starbucks to Hire 10,000 Veterans and Spouses

    Yesterday, Starbucks announced a plan to develop a hiring program for veterans and military spouses.

  • Low-Paying Fast-Food Jobs Cost Taxpayers Big Bucks

    Here's a new wrinkle on the debate over what constitutes a reasonable wage for fast food workers: New research from the University of California at Berkeley indicates that the fast food industry costs American taxpayers $7 billion annually, thanks to the fact that 52 percent of fast food workers are forced to rely in part on public assistance.

  • 3 Little-Known Jobs That Really Exist

    Ask a kid what he wants to be when he grows up, and you'll either get a fantastically improbably answer (Superman, and/or a unicorn) or something out of a guidance counselor's very shortest list of vocations (doctor, lawyer, veterinarian that specializes in puppies and kittens). That's because most of us, even grownups, are only aware of a very small subsection of all possible jobs.

  • Fast Food Jobs Are Fast Tracks to Dead Ends
    The face of the fast food worker has changed drastically. No longer a pimply-faced teenager fumbling through his first experience with employment, your cashier is an adult.
  • Who Works in Fast Food Today? [infographic]

    Fast food workers in 60 cities around the country have been on strike this past week, demanding $15 an hour (or almost double the minimum wage in some areas) and the right to form unions.

  • The Face of the Fast Food Worker's Strike

    Working women and mothers are the face of the fast food strikes. Unable to bring their families out of poverty on minimum wage, workers have taken their demands for reasonable pay to the streets.

  • Low Pay Is Not Okay

    Low Pay Is Not Okay
    Fast food workers took to the streets yesterday with chants such as "Hey, hey, ho, ho, poverty wages have got to go!" But who is paying more attention to the plight of the low wage worker? Lawmakers, or the customers buying cheap lattes and Big Macs?
  • National Fast Food Workers Strike for Living Wages
    Fast food workers are no longer fighting their battles alone. Various groups, including union organizers and religious groups, are calling for fast food workers across the nation to walk off their jobs together.
  • Chocolate Consultant or Chocolate Taster?
    Chocolate has been linked to some of the "feel good" chemicals in our brains, so professional chocolate tasters and entrepreneurial chocolate consultants must be some of the happiest people on the planet. Their dentists must be getting rich, too.
  • This Is What Happens When You Get Rid of Tipping

    Those of you who channel your inner Mr. Pink when you go out to eat will be alarmed to discover that getting rid of voluntary tipping actually improves service, at least according to one restaurant owner.

  • Paying Employees More Is Smart Business for Some

    Paying an employee more than market value is traditionally considered bad business. But, increasingly, some businesses are experimenting with giving a little extra to employees and it appears to be a smart investment.

  • Is Culinary School Worth It?
    Meet Anastasia Cassidy, recent graduate of Le Cordon Bleu of Boston. She has kindly agreed to answer some questions for PayScale in the hopes of giving students considering culinary education information to make a wise decision.
  • Cost of a Burger

    Cost of a Burger

    Recently, several media outlets have claimed that raising fast-food workers' salaries would raise the price of a Big Mac by only 68 cents. This figure represented only a 17 percent rise in prices; if it sounds too good to be true, it is. However, other research shows that the actual effects of paying workers a living wage, while higher than 68 cents, are not as bad as corporations make out.