ADVERTISEMENT
  • What Sets the Top Engineering Schools Apart? Not Just STEM.
    At first glance, the list of top colleges in PayScale's 2016 College Salary Report looks like a love letter to STEM degrees. Not only do science, technology, engineering, and math subjects dominate the list of highest-paid majors by any degree level, there is an undeniable correlation between how high a college or university ranks and the percentage of STEM degrees they grant. But, as anybody who passed a basic statistics class knows, correlation is not causation. A closer examination reveals that what separates the very best STEM-focused colleges from the rest is that they encourage students to branch out beyond a traditional STEM curriculum. By examining what drives the success of the highest-earning college graduates, we can all learn a valuable career lesson and increase our own earning potential.
  • Bruising or Beneficial: In the Amazon Debate, What Really Counts Is What You Want (From Your Employer)
    Ever since The New York Times published its scathing, 5,000-word takedown of work culture at Amazon, the topic of work-life balance has been the talk of the town. The commentary won't stop, whether it's from Amazon's most rabid defenders or passionate opponents. Even famously silent CEO Jeff Bezos has issued a response. The resulting debate has been fascinating (and probably a bit cathartic for anybody who found themselves working over the weekend), but searching for a definitive answer about whether Amazon is "good" or "bad" probably won't make a difference in your daily life or sense of job satisfaction. What you can, and should, take from the ongoing conversation is the importance of corporate culture in general and its effect on the way you think about the idea of total compensation, and ultimately, the way you negotiate salary.
  • Why Do We Rank Schools? Vote for PayScale at SXSW, and Find Out
    How does South by Southwest pick its panels? By asking the internet to choose which of its most burning questions deserves an answer first. This year, PayScale has three potential sessions up for your approval: The Rankers on College Rankings: Why We Do It; How To Diversify Tech & Hack Our Unconscious Bias; and How Working in a Social Agency Made Me Hate Social. Use the SXSW PanelPicker, and tell organizers what you need to know.
  • Is Amazon a 'Soulless, Dystopian Workplace'?
    This weekend, The New York Times published an exposé of working conditions at Amazon corporate. Amazonians, the article claims, are required to work long hours, in a data-driven environment that means constant performance evaluations; are expected to answer emails after midnight, sometimes at the prompting of follow-up texts; and are encouraged to inform on one another to management. Workers who don't come up to snuff allegedly are culled in layoffs that a former employee describes as "purposeful Darwinism" – some former employees claimed to have been pushed out after miscarriages or cancer. In an internal memo shortly after publication, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos responded, saying that the company described doesn't match his view of the organization and urging workers to come forward if they disagree.
  • Why People Quit Their Dream Jobs
    With an insanely competitive interview process that can take four to six weeks, include up to eight rounds of interviews, and require responses to seemingly irrelevant questions such as, "How many trees are there in Washington state?," jobs at Amazon and other top tech employers are hard to get. The thought of someone who actually managed to snag a coveted spot with a dream company voluntarily choosing to relinquish said position might sound unfathomable. And yet many people do exactly that.
  • 10 Female STEM Stars Under 30
    Women make up only 24 percent of the STEM workforce in the US, according to the Department of Commerce, and some fields are worse than others. Women represent only 14 percent of the country's engineers, but make up 47 percent of mathematicians and statisticians, 47 percent of life scientists, and 63 percent of social scientists. But as these rising stars of the tech industry show, women are making an impact on STEM. Given the impressive laundry list of accomplishments already made by all of the women on our list at such a young age, it's safe to say that both they and their careers are something to watch.
  • These Jobs Make the World a Worse Place (Say the People Who Do Them)
    What did you want to be when you grew up? Chances are, it was along the lines of unicorn wrangler or astronaut/basketball player – just the sort of thing that's impossible find a major in, never mind a grownup job. That doesn't mean that all real jobs are boring or unsatisfying; during the compilation of PayScale's latest report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, workers with titles as diverse as English teacher and chiropractor told us that their jobs made the world a better place. And then were the other folks, the ones whose jobs made them long for the days when "vet who specializes only in kittens" seemed like a reasonable career path.
  • SEM Strategists – We All Want to Know, Why Do You Hate Your Job?
    This week, we released our annual Most and Least Meaningful Jobs report, featuring a special category for Jobs That Make the World Worse, where we asked workers if they felt their job makes the world a better place. On this list, you wont be too shocked to find that occupations like Fast Food Workers, Warehouse Pickers, and Table Game Floor Supervisors topped the list. But what about SEM Strategists? SEM Strategists tied for fourth on our list of Jobs That Make the World Worse, and I want to know why.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Megan Baker, Senior Director of Program Management, FreeWheel
    Meet Megan Baker, Senior Director at FreeWheel, a company that produces and manages the technology behind ad-supported content for some of the heaviest hitters in the television industry. (Clients include ABC, AOL, DIRECTV, ESPN, NBC Universal, Turner Broadcasting, and Viacom, to name just a few.) Drawing on the same work ethic and no-holds-barred gumption she used to put herself through NYU by balancing multiple jobs while maintaining a full course load, the Long Island native forged an impressive career spanning multiple industries before landing at her current gig at FreeWheel.
  • The 5 Best Jobs for Working Parents
    Being a working parent was hard enough in the olden days, before mobile technology stretched office workers' days from 9 to 5 to 24/7. For many people who struggle to balance family commitments and professional responsibilities, even a workday that allowed them to leave the office and continue toiling online from home would be a refreshing change – but corporate cultures often demand face-time as well as productivity, leaving workers who'd like to see their kids out in the cold.
  • The 5 Best Jobs for Introverts
    The modern workplace can be a nightmare for introverts, with its focus on collaboration and open-plan offices. If you're a person who dreads team projects and public speaking and gets more of a thrill out of canceling plans to attend a networking function than penciling it into the calendar, one of these jobs from PayScale's Best Jobs for You data package might be perfect for you.
  • Interactive Map: What's the Most Common Uncommon Job in Your State?
    The most popular jobs in a given geographic area are usually pretty unsurprising, including titles like cashier, waitstaff, and customer service representative. It's not that there's anything wrong with these jobs; it's just that their very commonness means that you're used to hearing about them. But, what about the unusual jobs that are more common in one place than another – the helicopter pilots and professional gardeners and amusement park attendants? Those are the gigs PayScale looked at in a section of its latest data package on the best jobs for you. If you want a job that's common where you live, but uncommon anywhere else, start with this map.
  • Reddit CEO Ellen Pao: Fair Pay by Nixing Salary Negotiations
    After a jury recently dismissed her discrimination suit against venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins, Ellen Pao said, "If I've helped to level the playing field for women and minorities in venture capital, then the battle was worth it." In her current job as interim CEO of Reddit, she's fighting to narrow the gender wage gap by ending salary negotiations during the hiring process.
  • Snapchat Transforms New Grads Into Paper Millionaires
    Most recent college graduates would be thrilled just to get a job fresh out of school. If it pays the bills and makes a dent in those student loans, so much the better. But for some graduates of select engineering schools like Stanford, going to work at Snapchat will do more than just make ends meet.
  • The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs
    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.
  • Authors, Actors, and Now ... Developers? Why Agents Are the Next Big Trend in Tech
    The world in which employees worked at the same company for 30 years and retired with a gold watch is long gone. Today, it's much more common for a person to change jobs every four to five years and even that stretch of time with one company could be considered long, if you're a member of the tech industry, and living in the "1099 economy," so named after the 1099 tax form for reporting self-employment earnings.
  • What Code Should You Learn? [infographic]
    Learn to code. It's the advice of career experts everywhere, from high school guidance counselors to mid-career job coaches. But with literally hundreds of languages to choose from, you might find yourself a bit lost as to which language to focus on first -- especially if the goal isn't to become a computer programmer, but rather to boost your career in your current (non-programming) field.
  • Jobs Parents Just Don't Understand
    Many of the jobs workers are doing today didn't exist 20 years ago, or even 10 years ago. The world has been moving pretty fast, and our elders may struggle at times to keep up with all the innovation, technology, and novelty of today's work world. LinkedIn's recent survey found that one out of three parents has trouble understanding what their child does for a living, and half of them think they could be more supportive if they knew more. If your parents don't get what you do, here's how to explain it to them.
  • Microsoft CEO: Just Kidding, Women in Tech, Don't Trust Karma for Raises
    Yesterday, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella appeared at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, and gave some career advice to women in the technology industry that probably won't make its way onto the conference t-shirt: have "faith that the system will give you the right raise."
  • Low Stress, High Pay? These 3 Low-Pressure Jobs Can Pay $70k or More per Year

    It's common to think of stress and pay as a tradeoff. For example, surgeons and air traffic controllers pull down the big bucks because their work is not only beneficial to society, but potentially tough on the cortisol levels of the job-holder. We don't care how good you are at managing stress: if your job involves rebuilding the human body or landing several tons of steel and jet fuel, you're going to feel the pressure. But not every high-paying gig demands such sacrifices.