• 44 Percent of Hiring Managers Say Writing Is the Hard Skill Grads Lack Most
    Want to level up your career? You might want to brush up on those writing skills. In PayScale's 2016 Workforce-Skills Preparedness Report, hiring managers said writing was the hard skill most lacking in new grads – beyond data analysis, industry-specific software, or coding.
  • #MondayMotivation: 3 Ways to Beat Impostor Syndrome and Get Out of Your Own Way
    Are you your own worst enemy at work? If you have Impostor Syndrome, the answer is probably yes. Impostor Syndrome is internal feelings of phoniness and inadequacy that persist despite evidence to the contrary. If you feel like a fraud even when you're at the top of your game at work, you're familiar with this phenomenon.
  • #StarWarsDay: How to Use the Force to Boost Your Career
    "May the Fourth be with you." If you have any Star Wars fans in your life – and if you haven't, please pardon the rest of us as we electronically sidle away from you – you've probably already heard this a couple-hundred times this morning, counting online mentions. So you already know that today, May 4th, is a holy day for Star Wars fans and pun lovers everywhere. But what you probably don't know is that today is also an excellent day to think about what's missing in your career, and to set about fixing it. Forget your career bible of choice – what you need is The Force.
  • #MondayMotivation: 10 Pieces of Wisdom on Optimism From Baseball Players

    Yesterday marked Opening Day, the first day of the MLB season, and the last day every baseball fan starts off their morning filled with hope. Traditionally, by the end of the day, some of the more Eeyore-like fans have transitioned from, "Maybe this is our year," to, "This year will be an epic disaster." You're more likely to be one of those if your team lost one of the three games played yesterday, but it's not impossible to develop a glass-half-empty approach even if they didn't play at all. Trust me on this: I'm from Boston.

    As much fun as it is to be a cynic, too much pessimism isn't really good for you. Concentrating on the negative can impact your health, happiness, and even your career. Fortunately, baseball offers a cure, as well as means to develop the disease.

  • How to Keep Your Lazy Co-Worker From Ruining Your Career
    If you listen to NPR's Morning Edition on your way to work, you probably heard their recent segment, Before You Judge Lazy Workers, Consider They Might Serve a Purpose, which used agricultural studies involving ants and surprising advice from productivity experts to make the case that lazy individuals aren't always bad for the group. If you are not a lazy individual, but a member of the team that has to deal with them, however, you might have started your day with a white-knuckled rage grip on the steering wheel, screaming at your windshield as other commuters tried to pretend they were absorbed by the flow of traffic. Laziness, good? Tell that to the folks who have to pick up the slack. Why should Ferris get to ditch when everybody else has to go?
  • 5 Ways to Spring-Clean Your Career
    Many cultures have a tradition of cleaning house in the spring. That just makes sense: spring is a time of visible new beginnings, in the form of budding flowers and longer days, and for a lot of us, it's the first time in months we've had the energy to contemplate doing more than the bare minimum. If you've been feeling stuck in your career, spring is also the perfect time to dust off your resume and start honing your skills. You could be in a totally different place, professionally, by the time winter rolls round again.
  • Everything You Know About Being Successful Is Wrong

    "Research shows that the kind of happiness that does lead to long-lasting fulfillment is the kind of happiness that's derived from positive social relationships with other people," says Dr. Emma Seppälä, the Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. "A life of meaning, a life of purpose, a life characterized by altruism, something greater than oneself."

    A life, in other words, that can feel pretty difficult to create in today's corporate culture, which prizes achievement and productivity. But maybe there's another way to live and work. Seppälä's new book, The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success, examines research on happiness, and makes the case that finding fulfillment builds success, not the other way around.

  • 7 Ways to Change Your Career Luck, Starting Today
    When it comes to your career, there's a lot that's outside your control. You can't make a job opening appear when you really need one, or keep an awesome boss from transferring to another department, or boost the budget for raises and the opportunities for promotion. At the end of the day, pretty much all you can control is yourself and your behavior. The good news is that sometimes, that's enough.
  • Good News: Today Is Everything You Do Is Right Day
    In the pantheon of Awesome Fake Holidays, today – Everything You Do Is Right Day, according to important internet sources – is right up there with Talk Like a Pirate Day in terms of boosting your self-esteem and tickling your spirit. Just for today, it's OK to believe that everything you do will turn out right. (It's also OK to talk like a pirate, but you'll have to wait until September to do it without getting stared at.)
  • 4 Useful Work Skills You'd Never Put on Your Resume
    Deciding what exactly to put on your resume can be a daunting experience, and the format doesn't always allow you to give your potential employer the full spectrum of your qualifications. But if you are able get the job, remember that you're expected to bring a lot more to the table than just the skills you listed on your finely curated resume. With that said, here are some of the less-talked-about but absolutely differentiating skills you can learn in order to make yourself stand out from your co-workers.
  • 10 Quotes From Scientists to Inspire You on Pi Day
    Pi Day has been with us since at least 1988, when physicist Larry Shaw first led a parade of fruit-pie eating staffers at the San Francisco Exploratorium. It's hard to believe, though, that some math-minded folks hadn't noticed earlier the connection between today's date – 3.14, if noted in the American style, month-first – and the first digits of pi, 3.14, the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter. Regardless of how long you've been celebrating, today's a great day to eat pie, wish Albert Einstein a happy birthday, or generally get inspired by math and science.
  • Shadow Your Way Into a New Job
    If you are seriously considering a role or career change, job shadowing your prospective position could get you closest to the actual experience of being on the job. Job shadowing is a technique, not only useful for fresh graduates, but also for experienced employees who are pondering a career move. As the term suggests, it is an opportunity to shadow the incumbent to understand the skills, behavior, and aptitude required to perform the job.
  • Hollywood Is 'Sorority-Racist': Chris Rock Explains Unconscious Bias on Oscars Night

    Last night, during his opening monologue for the 88th Academy Awards, host Chris Rock gave perhaps the best explanation to date of unconscious bias and how it affects the careers of black actors. Hollywood, he said, isn't "burning-cross racist" or "fetch-me-some-lemonade racist." It's "sorority-racist."

    "Is Hollywood racist?" he asked. "You're damn right. Hollywood is racist, but it ain't that racist that you've grown accustomed to. Hollywood is sorority-racist. It's like, 'We like you, Rhonda, but you're not a Kappa.'"

  • How Samantha Bee Got Such a Diverse Writing Staff
    The latest entry into the late-night talk show ring is none other than Daily Show alum Samantha Bee and her new show, Full Frontal. She's a remarkable newcomer for a few reasons. First, she's a woman in a sea of dudes behind desks (a literal representation of this was recently published by Vanity Fair). Secondly, she's created a writing staff that is atypical for comedy staffs — it's 50 percent female and 30 percent nonwhite. So how did she manage that? The answers could surprise you.
  • 3 Habits of Successful Interns (and Internship Programs)
    Internship programs can seem daunting, especially when they're new. It's a good idea to think about what you're getting into, whether you're a manager overseeing a new program or a prospective intern looking for an opportunity of a lifetime. A little preparation can make sure that everyone gets what they want out of the experience.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Beat the Resume Robots and Get Hired
    Before your resume ever reaches human eyes, it has to make it through the Applicant Tracking System, the software program that scans your CV and decides whether you make it to the people part of the hiring process. Understanding how these Applicant Tracking Systems work might mean the difference between getting that first interview and twiddling your thumbs while your resume languishes in the depths of a database. In this week's roundup, we get an inside look at these resume robots, plus learn about time management personality types and find out one reason why your last meeting was a bust.
  • Could a Little FOMO Be a Good Thing for Your Career?
    FOMO (or fear of missing out) is a very real feeling that your friends are having fun without you. When that fear creeps into our work lives from our personal lives, it takes the form of envy: somewhere out there, someone's career is advancing faster than your own. But could those (let's face it, kind of ugly) feelings of FOMO actually help inspire you?
  • How to Escape Your Own Personal Career Groundhog Day
    Punxsutawney Phil says it's going to be an early spring, and if you heard that in Bill Murray's voice, you are old. Just kidding, youthful Bill Murray superfans – you don't need to have seen Groundhog Day in the theater to appreciate its message. In fact, the movie is such a classic, it was deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant by the United States National Film Registry in 2006, and selected for preservation. What about the film strikes a chord, even 23 years after its release? Well, if you've ever had a terrible job, you probably relate to Murray's character, Phil Connors, a self-absorbed weatherman who's stuck repeating the same day over and over again.
  • Stop Getting in Your Own Way
    Have you ever heard that you are your own worst enemy? It's true. Lots of time when we're not getting anywhere, career-wise, it turns out that we can only blame ourselves. But, before you throw those hands up in the air in frustration, learn about these ways in which you might be holding yourself back — and more importantly, find out how to let yourself succeed.
  • 4 Tips to Get Your Boss to Do Something They Don't Want to Do
    Being the bearer of bad news is never easy. Worse is when you have to try and break something to your boss, or maybe even ask them to do something they really don't want to do. Here are some tips for how to make that conversation less awkward, and more awesome.

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)


Comp Managers: Start Here »
ADVERTISEMENT