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  • Does the Boss's Gender Change How Men Negotiate Salary?
    Salary negotiation is important. The salary you command at the start of a new job impacts your pay for the remainder of your time with the company, and possibly beyond. Over time, not negotiating can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost pay. Furthermore, people who ask for raises earn more than those who don't. We know that women are less likely to negotiate than men, but gender can also impact negotiation from the other side of the table. Recent research suggests that men negotiate differently when their boss is a woman.
  • 7 Career Tips for Millennials From Famous Success Stories
    If you're early on in your career, it's okay if you don't know exactly what you want to do with the rest of your life – join the club. Regardless of what career path you end up choosing, it's wise to plan as much as possible for the road ahead. To help you out, here are seven valuable pieces of advice from some of the world's most inspirational influencers to help you navigate through your career successfully.
  • Women Study Computer Science, So Why Are There So Few Women in Tech?
    Recent studies show that a vast majority of female students are interested enough in tech to study it in college, however, the number of women in tech careers doesn't reflect that – not even by a long shot. Let's take a look at why so many women fall off the tech career path before even choosing a major.
  • Ladies, Here's the Key to Not Feeling Guilty About Negotiating a Raise
    Negotiating a raise is no easy feat, especially for women who are crippled by the stigma that negotiating makes them greedy, bossy, or ungrateful. Read on to learn how to reverse those feelings of guilt and turn them into the fuel you need to get the salary you've rightfully earned and deserve.
  • 4 Ways Finances Affect Women Differently Than Men in Their Careers
    It's a fact. Women are more likely to discuss health issues than financial matters, but the reason why isn't as obvious as you may think. Yes, women tend to be more open about personal stuff than men, but the reason they refrain from money talks is because they feel insecure about their "lack of financial knowledge and experience," and don't know "where to turn for guidance," says a recent study. Let's take a look at four factors that contribute to the financial insecurities that are unique to women in their careers.
  • Veteran Teachers Are Tired of Still Being Broke
    It's realistic to expect that, as professionals starting a career, we might not be paid very well at first. Expectations of bringing home the big bucks as soon as college ends are usually frustrated. But, it's also reasonable to assume that our salaries will rise as we gain experience and prove our commitment to our work and the institutions we work for. However, that might not be the case for teachers. Let's take a look at some facts about teachers' pay.
  • The Secret to Smarter Salary Negotiation: Vacation Time
    Negotiating your salary is hard. Especially when you're first starting out in your career, there are countless unknowns that only seem to affirm your fears: You don't know what your firm's budget is, and you feel expendable – like one wrong counter-offer and the ticking time bomb that is your career will explode. In reality, good negotiating isn't about low-balling yourself into irrelevant safety. It's about playing with what you've got. In this case, you've got time.
  • Why the Lower Unemployment Rate Is Bad News
    The unemployment rate has declined to 5.3 percent this month, but no one's planning a parade to celebrate. If you've been keeping up with news on the economy, that might sound crazy. After all, this is the lowest unemployment rate since April 2008, when the recession was first taking hold. Why aren't we cheering in the streets?
  • How to Tell If It's Time to Switch Careers
    Are you contemplating whether now's the right time to switch careers? If so, then you should know that there's a right way to change careers, and a wrong way. Here's what you need to know to ensure that you are well prepared to make a seamless transition into your new dream career, sooner than later.
  • Do Teachers Really Get Summers Off?
    Summer break has rolled in for most school districts by now, and students around the country are celebrating. Teachers too, no doubt. After a long year, they deserve to take a beat and get some rest before gearing up for a new crop of students in the fall. But, do teachers really get summers off? The answer may surprise you. Here are some things to keep in mind about teachers and summer vacation.
  • 4 Reasons Why Gen Xers Feel Extra Gloomy
    Generation Xers (born between 1965 and 1980) aren't getting as much attention as they used to. Millennials have increasingly worked their way into the headlines, stealing the show with their confidence (some say, overconfidence), independence, and out-of-the box approach to work, life, family, and just the world in general.
  • 5 Tips for Graduates From Economists
    Graduating from college is an exciting, and simultaneously scary, time in one's life. The future feels open and vast, and the opportunities seem endless yet somehow also slightly out of reach. It's a great time to look to others for advice and guidance in order to make good decisions and move toward a positive next step.
  • The 5 Worst States for Teachers
    Whether you're new to the profession, or a master veteran to the science/art, you probably know that teaching is a very difficult job. The curriculum, rules and regulations, and "best practices" are ever-changing so you can never get too comfortable. The money isn't great – to say the least. Not to mention that, on any given day, the work itself is seemingly endless, very difficult, and largely underappreciated (and/or misunderstood) by society at large.
  • The 5 Best States for Teachers
    Teaching is difficult work. However, some factors (such as compensation and teacher/student ratio) can make a big difference. Recently, WalletHub examined 50 states plus the District of Columbia using 18 metrics in order to determine the best and worst states for teachers.
  • 4 Reasons You Don't Need a Formal Mentor
    When you're new to a field, or even just working in a new position, there's a lot to learn. It's useful to have someone to help you understand the ins and outs of the work. And, it's important to be able to get your questions answered when they pop up. A lot of people feel that there are tremendous benefits to participating in a formal mentor/mentee relationship in order to address these needs. However, there might be another way – or even a better way – to meet the same goals. Here are some reasons you might NOT need a mentor.
  • 5 CEOs Share the Best Advice They've Received for Career Success
    Everyone wants to be successful in life, but sometimes it can seems like the odds are against you. Fret not, because you're not alone. In fact, many of the most revered leaders admit to having to overcome adversity and defy the odds to get where they are today. Read on to see the greatest career advice from five of today's top CEOs in the business world. Spoiler alert: Hard work pays off.
  • 89 Percent of Minimum Wage Workers are Over 20 Years Old
    Historically, Americans who didn't attend college (or even those that didn't complete high school) had an abundant job market available to them. Working as farmers or factory workers, unskilled laborers still made less than skilled workers, but they were able to make a decent living and, during many times in history, actually secure a middle-class lifestyle for their families.
  • The 5 Best Cities to Start Your Career
    There are many important factors to consider when deciding where to start one's career. Recent college grads, for example, might want to live close to family or friends, or in an area or region that they are particularly fond of for one reason or another. It's important to like where you live, but it's also important to consider economic/job market factors before making a final decision.
  • The 5 Worst Cities to Start Your Career
    Although the economy (and the job market) have improved in recent years, the progress has been spotty. Some regions are in much better financial positions than others. For example, the unemployment rate varies widely state to state. For recent college grads, choosing where to launch a career is an important decision with potentially far-reaching consequences.
  • Millennials and Women Don't Negotiate Salary: Here's Why That's Important
    Negotiating salary does more than just net you more money in the short-term; in the long-term, it leads to important financial advances that are hard to come by any other way. You won't just feel the impact of the extra income during your first year of employment; it will continue to be a factor in increases going forward, as many raises and bonuses are calculated based on a percentage of salary.