• Want a Good Day? Don't Do These 7 Things Before 10 a.m.
    The beginning of your workday is important. Many people feel as though they get the most accomplished during the first couple hours of the day, whereas others take a while to get warmed up. Whichever camp you fall into, these early morning minutes set the tone for the rest of the day. There are some things you should never ever do during these critical hours. Avoiding them should help you get your day started on the right foot.
  • Forbes: Today's Billionaires Are Younger, 'Poorer,' More Numerous
    Bill Gates topped Forbes' 2015 billionaires list, and the other top names will look equally familiar, including Carlos Slim Helu (No. 2) and Warren Buffett (up to No. 3 this year, and the biggest gainer on the list). Elsewhere, though, the list contained plenty of shakeups and new faces.
  • When Is a High-Paying Job Not Worth It?
    You've been offered a job that you're not sure about when suddenly the talk turns to salary -- and the employer is prepared to pay you a lot more than you ever imagined. As visions of a new car and luxurious vacations dance in your head, you quickly forget your initial reservations. A nice paycheck can certainly make up for a lot of faults, but it doesn't guarantee happiness.
  • A New/Old Strategy for Career Success: Handwritten Letters
    When's the last time you wrote a letter by hand? If you're like many of us, it was probably the last time you had to write an actual thank-you note -- your wedding, perhaps, or a childhood birthday. If you are already short on time, the idea of adding such a labor-intensive project to your to-do list can seem overwhelming. But taking 10 minutes a week to send at least one handwritten letter can provide a networking boost that email can't offer.
  • 5 Creative Ways to Revive Your Struggling Career
    What have you done for your career lately? Chances are, not enough. Much like a relationship, your career also needs proper care and attention in order for it to flourish. If you're guilty of being neglectful, here are five creative ways to help you rekindle the fire and fall back in love with your career.
  • Meet the YouTube Millionaires
    Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)
  • Why Women Don't Negotiate Salary, and What to Do About It
    We've all heard about the gender wage gap, and experts love to wax eloquent on the reasons why women make less money. Some say that women tend to choose occupations that pay less, others blame women for taking time out to raise children. There is plenty of evidence pointing to another reason, however: research shows that women make less money than men for performing the same work because of societal expectations of behavior for men and women. Women likely fall victim to these expectations even if we don't realize it; we can counter these deep-seated cultural norms to our own benefit.
  • 5 Reasons to Get to Work Early
    Most mornings, hitting the snooze button a time or 10 feels a lot more enticing than catching the worm and getting to work early. However, the benefits of doing so far outweigh the drawbacks. Even if you aren't a morning person, it might be worth considering an earlier start.
  • Revolva vs. Oprah: Should You Ever Work for Free?
    In a perfect world, everyone with the passion, skill, and willingness to work hard would have his or her dream job -- and a dream salary to match. Reality, of course, is often quite different. But there's a world of difference between making less than you want (or even less than you're worth) and making nothing at all. And yet, for people in the arts, this is often the pitch: work for nothing, hoping that exposure or another project for your portfolio will lead you to real, paying work down the road. The question, of course, is whether or not it's ever worth it to do so. After all, you can't pay the rent with exposure.
  • 9 Tips to Help You Become a Stand-Out Candidate
    Job searching takes a lot out of a person. Updating your resume, searching high and low for job availabilities, anxiously wait for a call back (if you even get one, that is), then rinsing and repeating -- it's time-consuming and stressful, even if you ultimately get your desired result. The process is exhausting and completely not fun, but that doesn't mean you can't be good at it. Here's how to master your job search and build the career of your dreams.
  • Looking for a Higher Starting Salary? Don't Fall For These Employer Tricks
    If you are in the offer negotiation stage, beware. While you want a higher starting salary, your employer wants to get you in at as low a salary as possible. Stay on your guard and watch for these tactics when it's time to talk numbers.
  • 'A Man Wouldn't': What Women Need to Know About Negotiating Salary
    Recently, a friend emailed me to say that she had received a job offer from a company she'd been working for on a contract basis. The offer was still taking shape; in a week's time, she'd have to sit down and have the dreaded salary negotiation discussion. Her question was one that PayScale's users ask again and again: what's the magic salary number, the one that will neither cheat the asker nor shut down negotiations entirely? After asking her a few questions about the job and its responsibilities, and factoring in that it was in New York, one of our finest and most expensive cities, I pointed her to PayScale's Research Center to determine a salary range -- and more importantly, a drop-dead number, the salary below which she wouldn't feel comfortable taking the job. "Don't take less than that," I told her. "A man wouldn't."
  • Find Out What Careers Best Suit Your Personality Type [infographic]
    Choosing a career based solely on its earning potential used to be just fine. Nowadays, research shows that choosing a career path that fits your personality type is the real money- and happiness-maker. Does your job best suit your personality type? Read on to find out.
  • 5 Ways to Get Unstuck In Your Career
    As they say, it happens to the bet of us. Getting stuck in your career isn’t the end of the road, it can actually be a hidden opportunity ready for the taking. Here are a few tips to help you get yourself out of a seemingly hopeless career rut and on your way to professional bliss.
  • 5 Things Recruiters Are Looking for on Your Social Media Profiles
    It's no surprise that recruiters are turning to social media to scope out potential employees. Therefore, it's essential that candidates understand what recruiters are looking for online. These elements of your profiles are making a big impression on recruiters -- for good or for ill.
  • 3 Things You Don't Know About Negotiating Salary
    To compile the recently issued Salary Negotiation Guide, PayScale asked 31,000 people whether they'd ever negotiated their salary. Fifty-seven percent said they had not. Given that not negotiating salary can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of a lifetime -- and that 75 percent of people who ask get at least some kind of salary bump -- it obviously makes sense to hit the bargaining table before you accept a new job offer or let your annual review go by without initiating a discussion about money. Still reluctant? Arm yourself with the facts.
  • The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs
    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.
  • What to Do When You Find Out That You Are Wildly Underpaid
    Through a casual discussion with your colleagues, you suddenly realize that you are making significantly less money than co-workers with the same experience and job title. Or, a clerical error occurs, and you see something you shouldn't: the new team you are assigned to train going to be making nearly as much or more than you. Whatever the means of discovery, the realization is that you are indeed underpaid. So what can you do about it?
  • 10 Buzzwords to Eliminate From Your LinkedIn Profile for, Like, Ever [infographic]
    Gone are the days when listing cliche keywords -- like motivated, passionate, and experienced -- on your resume got you noticed by recruiters. Read on to see which buzzwords were most overused on LinkedIn last year, so that you don't end up blending in with the rest of the crowd in the new year.
  • The 10 Most (and 10 Least) Profitable Undergraduate College Degrees
    Of course, you could make your millions after earning your bachelor's degree in English or art history, but if high earning potential is your post-graduation goal, you'll want to target your educational plans accordingly. (Hint: think STEM.)