• 3 Ways You Know Your Boss Hates You (and What to Do About it)
    Feel like the boss doesn't like you? It might not be paranoia. It's possible that the boss really doesn't care for you. Worse, he might even want you to quit. If that is the case, staying in your current position may not be the best way to advance your career. Sometimes, however, you can find ways to improve the situation and have a good working relationship with your boss. Here are the three biggest signs your boss doesn't care for you, and how to respond.
  • Facebook at Work: The LinkedIn Killer?
    It's hard to keep a secret in the online world. Ask any Facebook user who's ever forgotten to check those privacy settings before posting pictures of the holiday party. Or better yet, ask the social networking giant itself. Its latest project, Facebook at Work, in development for a year, was a secret before The Financial Times spilled the beans this weekend. Here's what we know so far.
  • 3 Tips to Avoid 'To Whom It May Concern'
    The five little words, "To Whom It May Concern," have been used to kick off traditional cover letters for decades. We are programmed to begin our formal introduction to companies this way. Having been taught that this was the correct salutation for a business letter of this kind, most of us don't even question it. But, maybe we should. At best, the phrase doesn't do us any favors; it just meets expectations and gets the job done. These days, we can do better.
  • This App Can Help You Network Better
    Ever been about to walk into a meeting or job interview, yet had no idea who you were about to talk to? Most people would tell you to prep for a meeting by looking at the participants' LinkedIn profiles to get a sense of what they do, what they’ve done, and a little bit about their educational background to see if you have anything in common. But what if there was an app that did actually did all that legwork for you?
  • Avoid These 3 Body Language Mistakes and Get the Job
    There is no guarantee that your body language alone will get you a job -- you have to have the right educational background and skill set, too. However, when you are competing for a position with other candidates who look as good as you on paper, subtle interactions during your interview can make significant differences. Avoid mistakes and look your best for your soon-to-be employers.
  • Work Friendships Are Not Necessarily Real Friendships
    Work friendships are good to have, but they are different from and do not take the place of real friendships. Recognize the difference between the two and enjoy the benefits of each, but avoid making the mistake of relying on work friends for real, personal companionship and confidence.
  • The Power of Introverts and the Benefits and Pitfalls of Group Work
    You've likely heard these adages before: "Many hands make light work." "Two heads are better than one." "The more, the merrier." There is truth in all of these sayings, but there are other, paradoxical truths as well. Extroverts may look forward to group meetings and talking about their progress on the group's project. However, all of this togetherness may be holding the introverts in the workplace back. The most productive office allows people the flexibility and autonomy individuals need to get their work done, and done well.
  • 5 Reasons Why LinkedIn Still Matters
    LinkedIn is a little different than other social networks, which offer news, community, and sometimes cute cat photos, but lack the laser focus on professionals and the recruiters and companies that hire them. Still, for overscheduled social media users, the question remains: "If I'm on X,Y, and Z social networks already, do I need to go to the time and trouble of creating (and perfecting) a LinkedIn profile, as well?" Here's why the answer is yes.
  • 5-Minute Networking Tips for Busy People

    Some people love networking; others would rather get a root canal while waiting in line at the DMV. No matter where you sit on that spectrum, you probably don't have a lot of time to make the connections that sustain your career. Fortunately, some of the best techniques for building professional relationships take hardly any time at all, and they're all based on the same idea: if you want to have friends, or at least people willing to lend you a hand if you need one, you have to be a friend.

  • 8 Tips to Network in Your New Job
    Think networking is just for getting a job? Think again. If you are new on the job, it helps a great deal to network and get to know your new co-workers. Effective internal networking not only helps establish strong professional (and sometimes personal) connections, but it also helps your career in the long term.
  • Is There Such a Thing as a Bad LinkedIn Endorsement?

    Done well, LinkedIn endorsements highlight your strengths, build the perception of your expertise, and show prospective employers that you have connections who are enthusiastic enough about you to take a few seconds out of their day to invest in you. But that doesn't mean you need to accept every single one -- or that you should.

  • Make Your Twitter Bio Help You Get the Job

    It's hard to sum up the whole of your experience, skills, and passions in a single-page resume. Shorten that to 160 characters, and you have two things: your Twitter bio and a writing exercise that's probably more challenging than anything you've had to do since your last poetry unit in high school English class.

  • How to Take a Great Selfie for Work
    Think the art of taking the perfect selfie is frivolous? Think again. In today's work world, we "meet" clients, co-workers, and even our bosses online before we meet them in person. Learning how to take a professional-looking and flattering photo of yourself is more important than ever before. The latest research in psychology shows how to make the best first impression online.
  • How Tattoos, Piercings, and Other Choices Affect First Impressions at Work
    Fairly or not, people make assumptions about others based upon mannerisms, clothing, and personal appearance. Research on first impressions gives us insight into how to control and direct the first impressions we make on others.
  • How to Successfully Collaborate With Co-workers
    In theory, a team should be more than the sum of its parts, with the individual strengths of the teammates contributing positively to the bottom line. In reality, well, a collaboration is only useful if it works. Many factors affect success or failure, including too much time spent in meetings and leaning on others to the point of laziness. When collaboration is successful, it is an incredibly useful tool for productivity and innovation in the workplace. Learn how to do it right.
  • Want to Make a Good First Impression? Here's What to Do
    Going on a job interview or meeting with a new client, you want to put your best foot forward and make this person want to work with you. Understand how different behaviors affect first impressions, and use them to your advantage.
  • How to Write a Great LinkedIn Invite
    If you’re looking for a new career opportunity, LinkedIn can be a great resource. It’s filled with people who are searching for someone, maybe even you, to fill an open job. The question is, how do you reach out to them in a way that makes sense?
  • Amazon Has the Most Attractive Tech Workers

    The makers of Hinge, a dating app that stresses professional affiliations as well as social connections, says that users swipe right for Amazon employees 14.2 percent above the average -- more than Apple, Google, or Facebook, whose network they use to validate user identity. (Ouch.)

  • Sexy Social Media Photos Make You Look Incompetent
    By now, you probably know that posting the wrong material on social media can have severe consequences for your career. But recent research indicates that posting revealing photos can backfire in one unexpected way: Your peers may see you as less competent.
  • Work BFFs Are Important, But Millennials Value Them the Most [infographic]

    LinkedIn's Relationships @Work study found that 46 percent of workers feel that their friends at the office contribute to their happiness, both at work and at home. Millennials were the most likely to report positive impacts from their office friendships.