• PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: To Be a Strong Leader, Embrace Vulnerability
    When is strength actually a weakness? When it's a facade of toughness, rather than the real deal. This special kind of workplace machismo can keep leaders from asking questions, and when it does, real problems result, both for companies and for the individual who's trying so hard to project strength. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to embrace vulnerability, plus how to get along better with co-workers, and the big mistakes you're probably making on social media, right now.
  • What Your Lunchroom Seating Choice Says About You
    Paying attention to seating choices during a meeting can tell us an awful lot about a group's dynamics. Naturally, the person running the discussion sits in a position of authority, usually at the end of a table or maybe at the center. Key players file in along at the leader's sides and folks whose participation is less critical fill the remaining chairs. We choose our seats at meetings for practical and logical reasons. But, could there also be meaning behind where we sit at other times during the workday? Where you choose to sit in the lunchroom, for example, tells others something about you, and could have an impact on how they see you and maybe even on your career. Let's take a look at some specifics to understand more about lunchroom seating choice.
  • How to Escape Your Own Personal Career Groundhog Day
    Punxsutawney Phil says it's going to be an early spring, and if you heard that in Bill Murray's voice, you are old. Just kidding, youthful Bill Murray superfans – you don't need to have seen Groundhog Day in the theater to appreciate its message. In fact, the movie is such a classic, it was deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant by the United States National Film Registry in 2006, and selected for preservation. What about the film strikes a chord, even 23 years after its release? Well, if you've ever had a terrible job, you probably relate to Murray's character, Phil Connors, a self-absorbed weatherman who's stuck repeating the same day over and over again.
  • Why You Should be Networking … at Work
    The best place for you to get your networking on might be the last place you'd imagine: at your current job. Whether you're just getting started at a new place or you've been there for years, the connections you make at work can benefit your career for years to come. With a strong network, you can reach your career goals faster, and maybe even go out on your own (if that's your thing). So what are you waiting for?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do I Get Paid for That Snow Day?
    Snow days aren't as much fun for adults as they are for kids, especially if you're not quite sure what inclement weather means for your paycheck. In this week's roundup, we look at who gets paid during snow days and other days off due to inclement weather, plus how to protect yourself from age discrimination on your resume and what to do right after a networking event.
  • How to Avoid Miscommunication at Work
    "The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place," George Bernard Shaw once said. Miscommunication in the workplace is very common. It's a big reason for missed project deadlines, postponed meetings, and misunderstood expectations. For example, maybe your boss expected you to be at work today because your leave was "till" today, but you meant it to "include" today. Sometimes, the communication channel just isn't clear.
  • 3 Reasons You Should Make a Cup of Tea Right Now
    As we start to settle into a brand-new year, the internet is abuzz with tips and tricks for improving your career in 2016. Whether you're into making career resolutions or just setting goals and intentions, this is a great time to reflect and prepare to move forward. But, sometimes the simplest of changes, the gentlest little nudges, can make the biggest difference. Believe it or not, making a cup of tea right now (and maybe regularly from now on) could make a positive impact on your health, happiness, and even your career. Let's take a look at a few reasons why this is the case.
  • What's Next? Teachers Who Change Careers Have Many Options
    Teaching is difficult and interesting work. It can be wonderfully fulfilling and simultaneously almost unbearably frustrating and stressful. Generally, it's not the kids who make teachers want to move on to another profession. Rather, it's something about the system itself, the culture, that eventually adds up to be too much. Some teachers are driven away by the long hours and low pay, others feel they need to move on because of trying relationships with administrators or too much tension with parents. Others find the curriculum, or the accompanying standardized tests, too limiting and confining.
  • 6 Key Supports to Have in Place for a Midlife Career Shift
    Changing careers is more common than you might think. After a time, the excitement and novelty of a job, or even an entire industry, can wear off and we realize we need a change. Perhaps new management or protocol/procedures help to push us toward the decision. Maybe, changing careers (often during our mid-30s to early 50s) is about chasing a dream, old or new; and who needs a better reason than that? For one reason or another, a lot of people decide at some point along the way to shift careers. It can be an exciting and ultimately rewarding choice, but it's important to make the proper preparations before taking the leap. Here are a few key supports to have in place before making a midlife career shift.
  • Lena Dunham and Emma Stone Discuss Nicknames in the Workplace
    Hopefully, it's a rare occurrence these days for a male co-worker or boss to summon a woman at the office with a demeaning nickname like "sweetie," or "honey," or (heaven forbid) "baby." Unfortunately though, it does still happen.
  • 4 Networking Tips For Introverts
    "Networking" is a word that can instantly conjure feelings of dread, particularly for introverted or shy individuals. It doesn't have to be painful, but talking to a bunch of strangers may be nerve-wracking if you feel out of practice or intimidated. Here are four ways to build and enjoy a network that will benefit your career for years to come, even if you aren't the most outgoing of people.
  • The 4 Largest US Endowments and Foundations
    Not sure about the difference between a foundation and an endowment, or why you should care about either? These nonprofit organizations fund education, scientific research, the arts, and healthcare. They have billions of dollars under their control and they invest in a variety of areas from bonds to real estate. Learning more about the largest endowments and foundations in the U.S. can help you understand the impact they have on humanity and the economy. Who knows, you might even want to consider working for one someday.
  • 4 Ways Impostor Syndrome Could Actually Be a Good Thing
    Impostor syndrome is a term used to describe the feeling of professional inadequacy (or even fakery) that exists despite evidence that indicates that the opposite is true. Generally, this "syndrome" is perceived to be a bad thing – as the name itself implies. But, is impostor syndrome all bad? Consider these four reasons why impostor syndrome might actually be a good thing.
  • 6 Ways Gratitude Can Boost Your Career
    By far, Thanksgiving is America's favorite secular holiday. Who can argue with delicious food, quality time with family and friends, and (hopefully) a nice long weekend!? However, unless we take just a little time to fully engage with the thankfulness aspect of the holiday, we're really selling ourselves short.
  • How to Drop Out During the Job Interview Process
    There are a lot of reasons why you might decide not to continue with the interview process, as a candidate: the role is no longer what you thought it would be, you have a huge conflict that's just come up and you cannot make it to the interview, you have a job offer from a different company, etc. But how do you get out of an interview, without completely ruining your chances with the hiring manager or the recruiter?
  • How to Network at Holiday Parties
    As the holiday season approaches, so do the holiday parties. These events bring up mixed feelings for most of us. In a way, look forward to the parties, anticipating that they'll be at least a little bit fun, but there is also so much to do around this time of year, and extra social events can feel like a waste of time. But, holiday parties are actually rife with opportunity – not just to enjoy ourselves, but to do a little professional networking while we're at it.
  • How to Be a Real Mentor
    If you've been approached to mentor someone, you've been given an amazing opportunity to guide your mentee's career, to impart your wisdom, to help them in their aspirations. In addition to being recognized for your achievements, and being valued for your experience, the opportunity to mentor someone relatively new in their career can be a mutually enriching association.
  • 6 Ways to Get What You Want at Work, Without Looking Like a Jerk
    It can be hard to ask for what you want at work, especially when you're anticipating a lot of push-back. But, when it comes to important things like salary or work-life balance or working conditions, it's essential not to give up. Here are a few tips for getting what you want at work, without alienating your co-workers, clients, or boss.
  • Networking, Without the Yuck
    If you're looking for ways to further your career, get started in an industry, or launch a new project, chances are you've been told that what you really need to do is network. But, there's something about "networking," especially when you call it by name, that can feel super icky. The good news is that it doesn't have to be.
  • 5 Mistakes People Make When Looking For a Mentor
    Having a mentor is one of the best things you can do for your career. All the education in the world can't fully prepare you for any profession. Getting in there and getting started can feel a little scary, no matter how much training you've had. And, you're bound to have a lot of questions. Having a mentor to go to for advice, wisdom, and sometimes even a little extra encouragement, can make a big difference. When looking for a mentor, there are a few common mistakes you should try to avoid. Steering clear of these should help you find someone who's the best fit for you.

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