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  • Study Finds Burnout Is the New Normal
    It doesn't take a bevy of research studies to tell us that Americans are working harder than ever. But, how we are processing and managing the stressful pace of our lives deserves a closer look.
  • Millennial Workers Are Less Engaged and Less Stressed Than Other Workers
    Millennials get a lot of attention in the media, in part because they're such a big generation – it's even projected that they'll outnumber Baby Boomers by the end of the year. Although they are the youngest adult-generation, they are shaking things up in the workplace with their unique skills and their impressive educational backgrounds. Millennials also bring different values and priorities to the table, already teaching older generations a little something about work-life balance.
  • What Happens When You Sit Next to the Boss
    The old saying goes, you're only truly yourself when you're alone. That's because it's human nature to change the way we behave, even just slightly, depending on who we're with. This is just as true in the workplace as it is in our personal lives.
  • 5 Things You Learn About Yourself By Working From Home
    Most employees would do anything and everything to be granted the opportunity to work from home, even occasionally. The idea of working in pajamas, not having to sit in traffic, and not dealing with pesky co-workers are just a few of the majestic wonders that make not going into the office so desirable. If you pay attention, you might even learn a few surprising insights into your own goals and motivations.
  • Rushed and Rude: The High Cost of Busyness
    Discretionary time for adults feels like a thing of the past. How often are most of us able to wake up and decide what to do today? Almost never. It can be difficult to set aside adequate family time, much less time for pure leisure activities, or for ourselves.
  • Everyone Needs Work-Life Balance, Not Just Women
    A national conversation around the issue of work-life balance has really taken root lately, and it has everyone talking about what can be done to better things moving forward. However, when we think about work-life balance, we should be mindful that it's an important issue for all adults – not just women. Here are some things to think about.
  • 5 Ways to Be a Stand-Out Employee While Working Remotely
    Working remotely seems like a godsend, but is it really as easy-breezy as it sounds? As it turns out, working from home is a huge adjustment for both the employee and the employer, but that doesn't mean it can't be a win-win situation for all parties involved. Here are five ways you can ensure that you're not wearing out your welcome as telecommuter and that you still wow your boss from the comfort of your own home (office).
  • What Nasty Gal Can Teach Us About the Importance of Corporate Culture
    If there's anyone who understands the term "rags to riches," it's Nasty Gal founder Sophia Amoruso, who built an online apparel empire from the ground up. However, according to some current and former Nasty Gal employees, the company's once-vibrant corporate culture isn't what it used to be, thanks to layoffs and restructuring. We'll examine how a company's culture can quickly go south and how to protect yourself from being blindsided in your career.
  • Feeling Anxious? Try These 5 Things
    A lot of people struggle with anxiety. It's extremely common actually; over 40 million adults in the US, 18 and older, struggle with it. But, just because anxiety is common, that doesn't make it any easier to cope with when it's happening to you. Thankfully, there are some things you can do to manage or even reduce the strain. Consider these tips.
  • Your Boss Wants You to Be Happy at Work (and That's Bad News)
    The sound you hear is your boss tossing his computer out the window after reading that headline. After all, isn't working for people who care about their employees' feelings a good thing? Before you accuse anyone of being an ingrate, rest assured: individual bosses who care are still a positive. However, as the recently published book The Happiness Industry suggests, the science of "happiness at work" has a dark side, and less to do with your emotional health than your ability to produce, produce, produce.
  • 4 Reasons Why Gen Xers Feel Extra Gloomy
    Generation Xers (born between 1965 and 1980) aren't getting as much attention as they used to. Millennials have increasingly worked their way into the headlines, stealing the show with their confidence (some say, overconfidence), independence, and out-of-the box approach to work, life, family, and just the world in general.
  • Helicopter Parents Could Damage Children's Careers
    The term "helicopter parent" is used to describe parents who hover over their children, smothering them with concern, attention, advice, and especially involvement. It's important that parents be involved in their children's lives, but helicopter parents, by definition, take it too far. Still, some folks proudly cop to the label, feeling that a desire to protect their kids is natural, and indeed it is. But, this style of parenting, when taken too far, can hurt more than it helps, especially if kids grow into adults and the helicoptering continues.
  • Slack's New Podcast: Stories About Work
    The Silicon Valley company, Slack, which is led by Flickr cofounder Stewart Butterfield, aims to change the way teams communicate in these here modern times. Their app, which makes work more fun (but might keep you there), is gaining popularity in workplaces, and alternative work spaces, across the county.
  • Early Career Success Guide: Don't Forget About the Soft Skills
    Hard skills will help you get the job, but if you want to keep it (and excel) you need soft skills as well. Knowing how to communicate effectively, rebound from a setback, and express commitment to your work will impress the boss, your co-workers, and your company's clients – all of which will make it easier to show off what you can do.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Get Along With the Boss
    Chances are, by the time you start your first "real" job, you've had bosses before. But what was appropriate at the ice cream stand or landscaping gig might not be OK in your new office environment. Even if you've had tons of internships and lots of practice dealing with corporate culture, expect a learning curve when you begin your first professional job. Every company and manager is different. If you want to be a success, you'll need to learn how to adapt and communicate with your particular boss.
  • 5 Tips for Managing, Reducing, and Repurposing Stress
    High levels of stress can be very dangerous, exacerbating existing health problems and even creating new ones. Most Americans report unhealthy stress levels, and 1 in 5 people qualify their stress levels as "extremely high." Even though more than 60 percent of people report that they've tried to reduce their stress in the last five years, more than half, 53 percent, are still trying to meet that goal. In fact, being stressed has become just as American as apple pie – but just because it's common doesn't mean that it's okay.
  • How to End a Toxic Work Friendship
    It's great to have friends at work, and there are a lot of benefits associated with it as well. But, when those friendships turn sour, they can take a toll on you personally as well as professionally. It can be difficult to detach and get distance from a toxic pal when you work together every day. But, it's an important thing to do no matter how tough it might be. Here are some tips for ending toxic workplace friendships.
  • 5 Things Working Mothers Really Want in Their Careers
    Women comprise nearly half of today's workforce. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 47.7 percent of households are dual-income, with both the husband and wife working. What's more, approximately 70 percent of these women are also mothers, who handle a vast majority of the household responsibilities along with their careers. It's not surprising, then, that working mothers are struggling to keep up with the high demands of juggling their personal and professional lives simultaneously. Here's what working mothers need in order to get a fair shot at attaining their goals in and out of the workplace.
  • 6 Things to Do When You Make a Mistake at Work
    We all make mistakes. It's part of life. But, that doesn't make it any easier to recover (in the eyes of others and within yourself) when you misstep at work. We're not talking about navigating a difference of opinion here, but rather an actual error that's plain as day for all to see and know. It can be hard to move through a time or situation where you've fumbled, but it's really important to recover and handle your mistakes in a positive way. Here are some tips.
  • 4 Reasons You Don't Need a Formal Mentor
    When you're new to a field, or even just working in a new position, there's a lot to learn. It's useful to have someone to help you understand the ins and outs of the work. And, it's important to be able to get your questions answered when they pop up. A lot of people feel that there are tremendous benefits to participating in a formal mentor/mentee relationship in order to address these needs. However, there might be another way – or even a better way – to meet the same goals. Here are some reasons you might NOT need a mentor.