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  • How to Hire Good Managers (When They Might Wind Up Managing You)

    When is a hire more than just the addition of another bright mind to your company? When the hire is a manager. Bad bosses are the No. 1 reason people hate -- and then leave -- their jobs, so if you're helping HR vet someone at the top of the food chain, you'll need to know how to recognize the signs, not only of a good boss, but of a good boss for your particular team.

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  • Write Things Down to Avoid Ambiguity and Conflict at Work

    Lack of good communication results in misunderstandings, differing expectations, and anxiety. If you reduce ambiguity in your communications, you reduce conflict and increase productivity. Yes, it really is that simple. Here's how.

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  • Would You Miss HR, If Your Company Got Rid of It?

    Human resources gets a lot of flak from other departments in the company. Much of the good they do (administering benefits, for example) is invisible, while their less enjoyable duties (handing out pink slips) are right out in the open for all to see. Recently, a few companies have done away with HR altogether, replacing some functions with software that automates payroll and benefits, etc. But are workers really better off without an HR department?

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  • Employees 'Recalled' Mozilla's Former CEO

    Brendan Eich lasted two weeks as CEO of Mozilla before pressure from employees led to his resignation. The reason for that pressure? Eich's $1,000 donation to California's Proposition 8, a 2008 ballot initiative that banned gay marriage in the state.

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  • New Gadget Might Finally Solve Workplace Arguments About Heat

    Ever worked in an office in which you're always sitting at your desk layered in sweaters, even when the temperature outside is a balmy 72 degrees, because the air conditioning is set so low it feels like winter? If so, you're not alone. In fact, this problem is so prevalent in offices that a team of MIT students have developed a new wearable called Wristify, designed to make you feel warmer or cooler in your own environment by exploiting two basic properties of human temperature perception.
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  • Should You Play That April Fools' Day Prank at the Office?

    April Fools' Day has been with us since long before Jim Halpert first suspended Dwight Schrute's stapler in Jello (or, if you're a fan of the original, Tim Canterbury suspended Gareth Keenan's stapler in jelly). And while the best April Fools' Day pranks help everyone blow off steam and regain access to their office equipment in record time, the worst waste time, money, and patience in an environment where all three are in short supply. In short: to prank or not to prank?

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  • Your Email Provider Knows Everything You're Saying About the Boss

    By now, most of us know that our employers are allowed to read our email. But what about the providers themselves? It turns out that the big tech companies like Google and Microsoft are probably reading your email ... right now. (Or, at least, their algorithms are.) The issue is whether or not you should care.

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  • 3 Types of Business Lunches (and What You Can Get Out of Them)

    Business lunches come in all shapes and sizes, from a department-wide learn at lunch session to a one-on-one interview with a prospective employer. To get the most out of any type of working lunch, you need to know what to expect, and prepare ahead of time.

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  • Woman Denied Lactation Room and Fired Is Not Getting Trial

    "I think it's best you go home and be with your babies" is not what an employee expects to hear upon returning to work after maternity leave. Unfortunately, it is exactly what Angela Ames heard when she requested access to a lactation room to express breast milk. Ms. Ames filed to sue for sexual discrimination, but has been denied access to a trial. The details will make any reasonable person's head spin.

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  • How to Rock Your First Job

    If you're graduating this spring, you're probably full of trepidation about what awaits you on the other side of that commencement ceremony -- even if you've been lucky enough to line up a job. No matter how casual the corporate culture you're about to enter, it'll be a big change from your life as a student. Here's what to expect.

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  • How to Manage Your Micromanager and Survive

    Micromanagers have to be in control of everything all the time, even the tiniest mundane details -- not exactly a great quality in a boss. While it is not pleasant for you, the worker, to feel that you have no autonomy, micromanagers are usually pretty stressed out themselves, either because they are under a lot of pressure from above or because they simply don't know how to delegate responsibility. You can, however, develop some working habits that will make your micromanager proud, and potentially cause him to loosen his grip.

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  • Here's How to Get Along With Your Messy Co-Worker

    Need another reason to hate the open office? Here's one: your messy co-worker's cluttered desk becomes your problem.

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  • 4 Tips for Women Working in a Man's World

    It's hard to be one of the guys when, well, you are not a guy. If you are a woman working in a male-dominated field or office, you likely want to be seen as an equal who is capable of doing her job. These four tips will help you succeed at your work and fit in with your co-workers.

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  • 5 Tips for Managing People You Can't Stand

    Here's one thing to know for certain, when you become a manager: sooner or later, you're going to have manage someone you don't like, or at least, disagree with frequently. This would be true even if you got to hand-pick every single member of your team. The goal, then, is to learn how to manage all your reports -- even the ones that set your teeth on edge -- in a way that maximizes productivity and is fair to all involved.

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  • Those Unpaid Security Screenings Might Not Be Legal

    Does your employer require you to go through a security screening before you go on the clock? If so, they might be breaking the law -- but if they are, they're not alone. Employees who work for companies that require security screenings often are not compensated for time spent being screened. Just a few years ago, groups of employees started filing suit against their employers for wage theft. Their basic argument was, of course, that they should be compensated for time given to the employer. If you are ever expected to give up your time without being compensated, here is what you need to know.

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  • Do Employers Still Care About Tattoos and Piercings?

    Many career counselors still tell their clients to avoid adding any body art they can't cover up for a job interview, but every time you see a news segment on a creative industry, half the people on the screen are covered in ink and flashing bits of metal. What gives?

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  • Employer Access to Social Media Accounts: What Does Your State Say?

    The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCLS) keeps tabs on what's new in each of the 50 states. Beginning in 2012, some state lawmakers introduced legislation protecting employees from being required to give up their social media account passwords in order to get or keep a job. And some states included laws preventing colleges and universities from requiring student passwords.
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  • How to Avoid (Unintentionally) Insulting Your Colleagues

    Passive-aggression at work is bad for everyone involved. It's not very different from yelling or bullying. But what about when you insult co-workers, with no intention of doing so? An objective examination of behavior, not intent, sheds light on how this happens, and how you can prevent being misunderstood.

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  • Lunchables ... for Adults?

    If you pine for the days when your lunch came in little plastic pockets, much like pills in a blister pack, rejoice: Oscar Meyer has recently announced that it will release "Portable Protein Packs" containing 170 calories worth of cheese, meat, and legumes. Aimed at adults who need a little something to tide them over on the trail or in the office, P3s resemble nothing so much as miniature Lunchables for adults. There's just one tiny problem.

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  • Too Much Vulnerability Is Counterproductive

    How much vulnerability is too much? A recent article in Psychology Today discusses how our interpersonal dynamics in the workplace have changed over the years. The pendulum swings back and forth on the issue of vulnerability.

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