• #MondayMotivation: 5 Easy Ways to Get Excited About Your Career Again, Starting Today
    In times of career crisis – when you're unemployed, or facing major upheaval on the org chart – you probably long to be bored. Then things settle down, and you get into a routine, and boredom doesn't seem that great after all. The problem, of course, is that once you're feeling meh about your job or your career, it's hard to motivate to do anything about it. Taking a class or setting up networking coffees seems like an awful lot of work. It'd be easier to just put in your time at the old desk and then go home and start methodically working your way through your Netflix queue.
  • The Truth About Our After-Work Email Habits
    Sometimes, the very innovations that we hope will simplify our lives actually end up complicating them. Technology makes our world smaller by speeding up the rate of our communication, but that doesn't necessarily make our work-lives easier or less stressful. Email is exactly this kind of double-edged sword. It comes with both benefits and drawbacks. But, through building better awareness of how email habits impact our lives, we can maximize the positive effects.
  • Chobani Yogurt's CEO Shares Stock With Employees, Grows Fantastic Culture
    Wouldn't it be nice if your boss handed you a million-dollar bonus in the form of company stock? On Tuesday, Chobani Yogurt Founder and CEO Hamdi Ulukaya may have done just that.
  • #WednesdayWisdom: 7 Tim Ferriss Quotes to Inspire True Productivity
    Even people who've never picked up a self-help book in their lives are at least familiar with Tim Ferriss, the productivity guru whose book, The 4-Hour Workweek, sold well over a million copies and spent four years on The New York Times bestseller list. Ferriss is not without his critics, but devotees are convinced that his advice is life-changing. Certainly, he'll get you thinking about the way we define success and how to achieve it, as well as how to get things done efficiently.
  • Rewards and Incentives: Do They Really Work?
    Rewards and incentive programs are a part of professional life for many. But, do they actually do what they're supposed to do – make us work more productively? Research has indicated that while these programs might make people work harder, they might not help anyone work smarter. Is performance really improved by incentive programs and rewards? Let's take a look at some of the most recent findings on the matter.
  • #MondayMotivation: 5 Ways to Work in Sprints and Rescue Your Productivity
    If you pride yourself on being able to keep a lot of plates spinning at the same time, I'm about to blow your mind: you probably aren't a good multitasker. That's nothing against you. The fact is, most people can only do one thing at a time. The folks who seem to be managing it are really just switching tasks quickly. But, even those super-productive people would be better off focusing. In fact, research shows that task switching could cost up to 40 percent of a worker's productive time.
  • 4 Reasons to Goof Off During Meetings
    How much do some people hate meetings? Seventeen percent say they'd literally rather watch paint dry than attend one. So, it's not surprising that we're tempted, on occasion, to goof off a little during meetings. Well, here's some good news – that might not be all bad. There are actually some benefits to goofing off a little. Let's take a closer look.
  • Here's Why CEO Pay Matters
    The Great Recession hit the U.S. economy pretty darn hard, and American workers are still recovering. We've learned, in recent years, that an improving economy doesn't necessarily mean better pay for workers. However, despite these challenging economic trends, top executives continue to earn huge sums of money, especially compared with how much their employees make and when measured against how much people in their position used to earn in decades past. Let's take a look at a few facts about CEO pay and also examine why it really does matter, quite a lot actually, to you and your employer.
  • Will You Help Me? Why Some Co-Workers Are More Likely to Say Yes Than Others
    Our interactions around the office, and our relationships with our colleagues, are certainly impacted by the corporate ladder and the rung on which we stand at any given point. Some employees might find themselves behaving a little differently with folks who are a few steps higher in the hierarchy when compared with how they act when they're around those who are a few notches below them. People even email differently when communicating with the top. To some extent, all of this is only natural. Of course interactions with higher-ups are a little different than with others. But, could status impact how willing people are to help each other around the office?
  • Improve Your Focus by Learning to Ignore Things
    Has the following situation ever happened to you? You come home for the weekend with a ton of work that you need to get done before Monday. But, instead of waking up on Saturday morning and getting right to it, you decide you need to clean up a little first instead. By the time the weekend ends, not only is your work done, but your house is clean, your bills are paid, and your taxes are filed as well. In an effort to procrastinate, you actually ended up being highly productive. If this sounds at all familiar, then you know that attention doesn't always work exactly the way we'd like it to, and you'll be interested in some of these tips regarding focus and productivity. Here's what you need to know.
  • 3 Types of Job Stress, and What to Do About Them
    Work-related stress is all too common these days. Although stress levels, overall, have declined in the last few years, 60 percent of Americans surveyed by the American Psychological Association last year reported feeling stressed because of work. The problem is likely to continue as long as our modern culture of overwork persists.
  • Unplug From Social Media, Get Productivity-Enhancing Zzzs
    We're learning more and more about the importance of a getting enough sleep. The quality and quantity of our sleep has an impact on our health, our relationships, mood, memory, the clarity of our thinking ... the list goes on and on. So, if you aim to take good (or even decent) care of yourself, sleep is something that really should be a priority.
  • Have a Messy Desk? You're in Great Company
    Do you have a messy office? Maybe your co-workers laugh about it a little when they pass by, but you assure them that you can "find anything in a matter of seconds" despite the way things look. Do you sometimes find yourself wondering how or why others manage to keep their spaces so tidy? If you have a messy desk, don't fret. It's not as bad a sign as you, or others, might think. Here are a few things you should know.
  • #MondayMotivation: Learn How to Procrastinate From 3 Famous Writers
    If you're a committed procrastinator, you're probably also pretty good at making excuses. Missed trains, minor domestic crises, even the tried-and-true "the dog ate my homework" routine – they're all pretty good for a delay, provided you don't use them too often. After a while, people will wonder why the train works for them, but not for you ... and how much it would cost to send your dog to obedience school on your behalf. Eventually, you're going to need some new stories to tell the boss.
  • 5 Emotional Skills Every Worker Should Possess
    If you're looking for work right now, you've probably heard a lot about the importance of developing skills (with technology, for example) as an essential step toward getting hired. But, you may have noticed an awful lot of talk about soft skills, as well. Writing, public speaking, and teamwork are increasingly coveted by employers. High emotional intelligence helps you develop the soft skills on your next employer's wishlist.
  • Everything You Know About Being Successful Is Wrong

    "Research shows that the kind of happiness that does lead to long-lasting fulfillment is the kind of happiness that's derived from positive social relationships with other people," says Dr. Emma Seppälä, the Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. "A life of meaning, a life of purpose, a life characterized by altruism, something greater than oneself."

    A life, in other words, that can feel pretty difficult to create in today's corporate culture, which prizes achievement and productivity. But maybe there's another way to live and work. Seppälä's new book, The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success, examines research on happiness, and makes the case that finding fulfillment builds success, not the other way around.

  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do You Feel Trapped in Your Career?
    The average person changes jobs 10 to 15 times over the course of their career, and spends less than five years at each job. Harder to figure out: how many times they change careers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn't track it, and many changes are pretty subtle anyway, as career paths naturally evolve over time. Sometimes, however, you have to make a leap. In this week's roundup, we look at what to do when you need to make a big career change, plus resume rules you should stop breaking, and ways to beat burnout.
  • Planning a Summer Vacation? 5 Reasons to Try for 2 Weeks
    March is about to go out like a lamb, and the blooming flowers and rising temperatures have a lot of people thinking about one thing – vacation. In fact, this is a great time of year to start planning your summer vacation away from the office. Before you submit that time-off request though, here's a thought: can you try for two weeks off?
  • What We Can Learn About Meetings From the Rare People Who Actually Enjoy Them
    Complaining about meetings is the unofficial sport of many workplaces. In fact, according to a recent Harris poll, sponsored by the online collaboration company Clarizen, 17 percent of employees said they would literally rather watch paint dry than attend a meeting, and eight percent would rather undergo a root canal. However, every now and again you come across a person, or even a group of people, who actually really enjoy meetings. Maybe we can learn something important about ourselves, or at least about how we collaborate, from thinking about their approach. Here are a few ideas to consider.
  • Sabbaticals Are Good for Workers and Employers
    If you're like most Americans, three things are probably true for you. First, you desperately need a break from your job. You're tired and stressed, and feeling rundown and overworked is typical for you. Second, despite this, you haven't taken a vacation in a while. And, it's not necessarily because you're not entitled – you might have unused vacation days. In that case, you feel that you can't, or shouldn't, get away from the office. You worry that it could hurt business, your individual performance, or even your career standing or trajectory. And finally, if you're like most American workers, you haven't even dared to dream about taking a sabbatical. But, maybe you should. You, and your employer, would be wise to take it under serious consideration. Here's what you need to know.

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