• How Robin Wright Asked for (and Got) the Same Pay as Kevin Spacey on 'House of Cards'
    For the first three seasons of Netflix's hit political thriller/soap opera House of Cards, Kevin Spacey earned more than Robin Wright – about $80,000 more per episode, according to The Huffington Post. When the show began, that might have made sense. Spacey, after all, started off as an Oscar winner, whereas Wright had been largely out of the spotlight for several years. Then, however, the Emmy nominations started rolling in, for Wright as well as Spacey. What would Claire Underwood do?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Should You Ever Take a Low-Ball Salary Offer?
    You know you should negotiate salary, but sometimes it's hard to act on what you know. Other times, you do your best to drive up the offer, to no avail: it's either take the gig, and deal with the low pay, or stay put. (And if you're unemployed, that can be a particularly difficult option to contemplate.) This week's roundup looks at what one expert says about taking lower offers, plus how to tell when it's time to look for a new job, and a few hints that the hiring manager probably won't be extending a job offer.
  • Secret Deodorant Commercial: The Gender Pay Gap Still Makes Us Sweat
    Have you negotiated your salary lately? If you're female, and the answer is no, it's probably because you're afraid to talk about money with the boss – and that's not your fault. Research shows that women are more likely to pay a social penalty when they ask for what they deserve. But, of course, if you don't ask, you don't get. So what's an enterprising female professional to do?
  • Lying About Your Salary History Is a Bad Idea, So Here's What to Do Instead
    Consider this scenario: you don't feel fairly compensated in your current job, so you start to look around for other opportunities. During the application or interview process, you are asked about your present salary – the same low salary that inspired you to look for a new job in the first place. If you tell the hiring manager the truth, you might wind up with an offer pegged to that low pay. But, if you lie, you'll almost certainly get caught. What to do?
  • #WednesdayWisdom: 3 Salary Negotiation Tips From Self-Made Billionaires
    Take a look at Forbes' World Billionaires list, and one thing becomes apparent: the best financial advice is to be born into wealth. Nearly a third of the world's billionaires come from money, even if they've managed to boost the family fortunes by dint of hard work. If you've neglected to choose your parents well from a financial perspective, the good news of course it that two-thirds of today's billionaires were not born with a Black Amex burning hole in their wallet. Those are the folks to look to, for inspiration in your next salary negotiation (even if you never quite make Facebook-money).
  • NFL Star DeMarcus Ware Is Betting His Salary on His Performance in 2016. Here's Why You Should Do the Same.
    We're now more than a month into the crazy days of NFL Free Agency, and if you're keeping up with how top players are negotiating contracts with their teams, you aren't just getting good pre-season entertainment — you might be learning some salary negotiation lessons you can apply to your career, even if your job title isn't as glamorous as "quarterback" or "defensive end."
  • 3 Career Lessons for Working Women From Hillary Clinton (Even If You're Voting for Someone Else)
    Understatement of the election year: Hillary Clinton is a polarizing figure. For some, she's inspirational – potentially the first female president, a woman who can get things done, the most accomplished candidate in terms of raw political experience. People in this camp tend to say things like, "If the presidential race were a job interview, you'd have to hire her, no question." But, then, of course, there's the other perspective, which says that she's not trustworthy, that she's made bad decisions when it counted, and that she might have broken the law. People who agree with this point of view tend to say things like, "She should be indicted." Today, we're not here to talk about whether either of these takes is right. We're here to talk about Hillary Clinton, the leader, and what working women can learn from her – yes, even if they're voting for Bernie or Cruz or Kasich or Trump, or writing in "Wonder Woman" and calling it a day.
  • Want to Negotiate Like a Pro? Use These 2 Unconventional Tactics
    Negotiating is no easy feat, especially when it involves your salary. However, as you know, the squeaky wheel gets the oil, so you better get squeaking if you want to up your salary. Here are a couple tricks of the trade to help you negotiate your way to a heftier paycheck, and do it confidently.
  • How Your New Salary Negotiation Hero Scored a $30,000 Raise
    In the post-recession economy, most people would count themselves lucky to get a 3 percent annual raise, or make a jump to a new job that gives them a couple of extra thousand dollars a year – even if that bump seems to disappear, once taxes come out. But not Claudia Telles. The 28-year-old quality specialist tells Business Insider that she managed to jump from a $41,000 annual salary to $72,000 – all without leaving her employer.
  • 5 Ways to Avoid Answering the Worst Job Interview Question, 'What's Your Salary History?'
    First things first: anyone who tells you that you can always dodge the salary history question is probably trying to sell you something. The reality of the situation is that sometimes, you just can't wriggle out of answering this question – not if you want to stay a viable candidate for the job. But, that doesn't mean that you should name your price right away. You might be able to get the hiring manager to focus on the future, not the past, and that's what you're hoping for.
  • 7 Ways to Change Your Career Luck, Starting Today
    When it comes to your career, there's a lot that's outside your control. You can't make a job opening appear when you really need one, or keep an awesome boss from transferring to another department, or boost the budget for raises and the opportunities for promotion. At the end of the day, pretty much all you can control is yourself and your behavior. The good news is that sometimes, that's enough.
  • What Not to Do During Salary Negotiations
    You're about to go in and ask someone for more money. It's a conversation that hasn't been easy since you were asking for an increase in your allowance. There are some ways you can make it easier on yourself, simply by avoiding some common pitfalls. After all, how you negotiate a raise could affect your future income for decades to come. Go into that room strong, with these tips.
  • Ask a Recruiter: The Top 6 Salary Negotiation Mistakes

    Getting a job offer is exciting, but the subsequent salary negotiation that takes place before you sign on can be nerve-wracking. Wouldn't it be nice to find out what's going through the recruiter's head during this process? Well, welcome to PayScale's newest blog series, "Ask a Recruiter." In this inaugural edition, Caitlin Williams, a member of PayScale's own Talent Acquisition team, shares the biggest mistakes she sees time after time in salary negotiations.

    Salary negotiation is a normal step in every job offer process. Not negotiating means leaving money on the table, but negotiating poorly can be just as dangerous. Not to give away the recruiter "secret sauce," but before you accept that new job offer, make sure to avoid these top salary negotiation mistakes. Trust me, I've seen them all!

  • Why You Should Negotiate Salary, Even at Your First Job
    "Your starting salary at the first company you work for is always going to suck." I can't exactly cite this quote to anyone in particular since I've heard it too many times to recall the original source. Point being, I was under the impression that my starting salary at my first job was going to be subpar. Yet, I realize now after checking out Payscale's Salary Negotiation Guide that being complacent about a low salary when I enter the workforce can really hurt my chances of earning more in the long run, as it is hurting lots of young people starting out in their careers today.
  • Too Scared to Negotiate Salary? Try These 3 Things
    Along with strategic advice on getting paid what you deserve, PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide offers insight into why you're not already commanding a salary that's commensurate with your skills and experience. For example, if you're like many people, you might be too scared to ask. Of the 57 percent of respondents to PayScale's survey who said that they had never negotiated salary, more than half refrained for reasons that boiled down to fear. Twenty-eight percent of non-negotiators said they were afraid to negotiate salary, while 19 percent didn't want to be perceived as pushy, and 8 percent were afraid of losing their jobs.
  • PayScale's Salary Negotiation Reddit AMA: What to Do When Your Employer Says, 'This Is All You Get'
    What would you ask a salary negotiation expert, if you had the chance? Earlier today, PayScale's salary data wizards stopped by Reddit to answer tough questions about the gender pay gap, negotiating starting salary, and what to do when the company says there's no room to negotiate. Here are a few of the highlights from the discussion.
  • Negotiating While Female: How to Get the Salary You Deserve
    First things first: despite what you might have heard, women are not worse negotiators than men. They're not even that much less likely to ask for a raise. Data collected for PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide showed that women reported negotiating salary nearly as often as men: 42 percent of women and 45 percent of men said they'd asked for a raise in their current field. However, research has shown that women are penalized more severely in terms of social costs when they engage in behaviors that appear "aggressive" or "unlikeable" – such as, for example, asking for more cash.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Insulted By Your Raise? Maybe Don't Yell at the Boss
    During a long enough career, most of us will wish for at least one do-over day, when mistakes and missteps are cancelled out and we get to start all over again. In this week's salary negotiation-themed blog roundup (in honor of PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide!), we look at one Ask a Manager reader who's probably wishing for a mulligan, plus tips on what to do when your co-workers are paid more than you, and a few salary negotiation strategies you've probably never heard of before.
  • PayScale's Latest Reddit AMA Will Answer Your Toughest Questions About Salary Negotiation
    It's the biggest question on every worker's mind: how can I make more money? Many would also like some expert input on how to negotiate salary without annoying the boss, losing a job offer, or just plain looking unprofessional. Well, January 19 is your lucky day. At 10:30 a.m. PST/1:30 p.m. ET, PayScale's salary negotiation experts will take on your toughest questions, plus outline some of the ongoing resources in our newly updated Salary Negotiation Guide. You won't want to miss it.
  • PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide: It's Time to Get the Salary You Deserve
    Seventy-five percent of people who ask for a raise get one, so why aren't you asking? If you're like many people, it's because you're afraid – 28 percent of respondents to PayScale's survey who didn't ask for more money said it was because they were uncomfortable negotiating salary, while 19 percent said they didn't want to be perceived as pushy. Eight percent were even scared they would lose their job. Most employers won't fire a worker for asking for a raise in a reasonable fashion, but knowing that might not help when you're in a panic. The best approach is to prepare for the salary negotiation discussion ahead of time, and make a plan – and PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide is here to help.

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