• Authors, Actors, and Now ... Developers? Why Agents Are the Next Big Trend in Tech
    The world in which employees worked at the same company for 30 years and retired with a gold watch is long gone. Today, it's much more common for a person to change jobs every four to five years and even that stretch of time with one company could be considered long, if you're a member of the tech industry, and living in the "1099 economy," so named after the 1099 tax form for reporting self-employment earnings.
  • Supreme Court Rules Against Amazon Workers: No Pay for Standing in Line
    The employee security-screening process doesn't have a reputation for being a pleasant experience. You've probably heard some of the horror stories, with long wait times and lost (or mistakenly taken) items. Perhaps the worst part about the experience for workers is that it's dead time -- you don't get paid for standing there, and you can't get that precious time back.
  • Here's What Workers Cared About in 2014: 10 Most Popular Posts
    Humans are fascinated by the worst-case scenario -- the blown job interview, the botched salary negotiation, the bad college choice. It's not always schadenfreude, either. By analyzing the bad things that could happen, it's easier to prepare and avoid them. This year, PayScale's most popular posts were the ones that helped readers dodge disaster.
  • 3 Ways to Get Ready for Your Year-End Review
    Ninety percent of companies do annual reviews, according to the Society for Human Resource Management, despite the fact that at least 60 percent of workers -- including managers -- dislike the review process. Many organizations compound the problem by having their evaluations at the tail-end of the year, when workers are feeling their least productive and focused. Of course, if your company does things this way, it's unlikely that you'll talk them out of it, no matter how solid your arguments are for change. The best you can do, as a worker, is to prepare.
  • How Much Are You Worth? What Millennials Don't Know About Negotiating Salary
    By now, you've heard that you should negotiate your starting salary before accepting a job offer. Failure to do so can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of your career. Knowing this, however, doesn't mean that negotiating is easy, or effective. If you're a younger worker, the challenges are even greater. Less experienced than your older colleagues, you're also less likely to know how to choose a target number. Recently, PayScale spoke with Tara Wyborny, Recruiting Leader at the G10 Associates Program at staffing company Genesis 10, to find out how Millennials can negotiate the best possible salary at the right job.
  • 3 Strange Salary Negotiation Tips
    Most salary negotiation advice is pretty run of the mill. Research the position. Know your worth. Understand the corporate culture you're operating in. Ask for what you deserve. Beyond those solid, staid tips, however, there's a whole realm of tricks waiting for you -- some of which might just get you the dollar amount you're looking for.
  • 8 Lesser Known Negotiation Tricks
    When you are negotiating your salary for a new job, don't just focus on base pay. Look for these additional factors that could impact your take-home salary and savings.
  • 7 Tips to Help You Get That Raise
    While some may advise leaving salary up to karma, we think that salary should reflect performance, skills, experience, and your company’s compensation philosophy. Whether you’re a man or woman, it is important to understand your worth and consider factors that influence your magic number, before you make your case for a salary increase.
  • Microsoft CEO: Just Kidding, Women in Tech, Don't Trust Karma for Raises
    Yesterday, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella appeared at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, and gave some career advice to women in the technology industry that probably won't make its way onto the conference t-shirt: have "faith that the system will give you the right raise."
  • Do This Before You Share Your Salary History

    Should you have to share your salary history? No, but try explaining that to many hiring managers -- or getting out of the conversation without tanking your chances at getting the job.

  • How to Negotiate a Better Salary When You're Underpaid

    The best time to negotiate salary is when you're considering a job offer. Even in these still-tricky economic times, you'll never have more power than before you sign on the dotted line. Sometimes, however, you work in a job for months or years, only to discover that other people with similar or lesser skill sets are getting paid more than you are. So what then?

  • 3 Times to Accept a Lower-Paying Job

    In a perfect world, we'd all love our jobs enough to do them for free, and have the independent wealth necessary to be able to afford it. In this imperfect world, well, someone needs to pay the electric bill. While you should always negotiate to get the best possible rate for your services, skills, and knowledge, there are times when it makes sense to accept less money.

  • Negotiate for These 10 Things When There's No More Money

    Ask anyone what they want in a new job, and money is sure to be at the top of the list. Most negotiating advice is geared toward that, offering tips on dealing with the question of salary history, figuring out how much you're worth, and asking for more than an initial low-ball offer. But what do you do when there's no more wiggle room, but you still want the job?

  • Job Relocation Checklist: Do These 5 Things Before You Move

    The hardest part of moving for work is deciding to take the plunge. Once that's out of the way, you're dealing with details. Of course, how you handle the little things that go into your relocation can make a big difference to your quality of life in your new home and at your new job.

  • How Much Money Do You Need to Make, in Order to Feel Like a Success?

    Whoever said money doesn't buy happiness never tried to pay their mortgage armed with only a positive attitude. Most of us need a certain amount of financial security in order to be satisfied. A recent CareerBuilder survey translates that into dollars and cents: $75,000, it turns out, is the magic number. But this doesn't mean earning that salary will necessarily make all workers feel successful.

  • Should You Share Your Salary With Your Co-workers?

    Salary transparency is hot right now. More companies are revealing what workers make, in the hopes that it will increase trust, improve productivity, even minimize the gender pay gap. But that doesn't meant that sharing salaries is totally without peril for employees.

  • Interviewing for a Job? 4 Tips to Ensure That You Are Not Leaving Money on the Table
    At some point during your interview process, either at the initial screening or during the offer phase, you can expect to hear this question: “What are your salary expectations?” How you handle this question will decide what you earn, perhaps for years to come.
  • First Job? Do These 3 Things for a Bright Financial Future

    If you're just starting out your career, and recently got your first job, you're most likely relieved to be employed. Also, if you've been living like a student -- i.e., on a tight budget -- you might feel rich. (At least until those student loans kick in.) So what should you do first, to make sure that you have the best shot at financial security down the road?

  • Is It OK to Ask About Salary in a Job Interview?

    The conventional wisdom is that it's in a candidate's best interest to delay the salary discussion for as long as they can, both to gather information on the position and its duties and to encourage the hiring manager to throw out the first number. A recent survey from staffing services provider Robert Half, however, indicates that 31 percent of managers are comfortable with applicants asking about compensation and benefits in the very first interview. A further 38 percent say that it's OK on interview number two, and 9 percent will even accept it during the phone screen.

  • Is It Possible to Make Too Much Money?

    Being overpaid is probably not something you've ever spent much time worrying about. After all, real wages are down 7.7 percent, compared with 2006 numbers, and 23 percent of workers were laid off at some point during the recession. Earning too little seems more likely -- and more dire -- than earning too much. So should you even worry about being overpaid, in the first place?