• Why Being a Whistle-blowing Employee Is a Good Thing
    Many employees are discouraged to voice their concerns in the workplace, especially those that are not in managerial or upper-level positions. However, we’ll take a look at how speaking up can actually make you a valuable asset to your employer.
  • Sorry, Not Sorry: Can Apologizing Too Much Hurt Your Career?
    Whether you’re a high-ranking executive or an entry-level employee, being too remorseful could negatively affect your reputation as a professional and cause others to perceive you as weak. We’ll examine how too many apologies could leave your career in a sorry state of affairs.
  • Money Doesn’t Buy Happiness in Your Career – Purpose Does [infographic]
    A recent poll found that 70 percent of today’s professionals prefer a job that they enjoy, rather than a job that pays well. It looks like money doesn’t buy happiness after all – well, at least not in the workplace.
  • Biting the Hand That Feeds: Lululemon’s Founder Steps Down as Chairman
    Lululemon – you either love the brand, or you hate it. And if you were a victim of their see-through yoga pants disaster, then you probably are in the latter group. We’ll take a look at how throwing caution to the wind in business can cause your career to unravel at the seams.
  • 3 Reasons Mothers Make the Best Employees
    Mothers get the short end of the stick when it comes to equal pay in the working world. But, contrary to popular belief, working mothers might actually make the best employees.
  • Here's What the Hiring Manager Is Really Looking For
    As it turns out, the good employers that provide promising careers want to hire you because of your strengths and your weaknesses. Don’t believe us? Then, read on to find out more.
  • TED Talks: What Makes Us Feel Good About Our Work? by Dan Ariely

    Do you know what makes you feel good about your work? Is it the acknowledgement, a hefty compensation, or simply the satisfaction of doing a good job? According to an experiment involving Legos and Bionicles (yes, the awesome robots!), finding even the tiniest bit of meaning in our work is essential to our happiness.

  • TED Talks: Getting Out of the 'Box' for More Out-of-the-Box Thinking
    Studies show that employees feel more than half of the time they spend in meetings is a complete waste of time. So, what's the secret to holding a productive meeting? Perhaps it's to have the meeting while walking. Hey, if these "take a stroll" meetings worked for business moguls like Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg, then our guess is that they will probably work for you too.
  • Turn That Frown Upside Down: Are You a Happy Employee? [infographic]
    The sad reality of having a job is that you probably hate it, at least some of the time. No one wants to do something that they "have" to do. So what does it take to make you a happy camper at work? Let's take a look at Yast.com's infographic "What Makes an Employee Happy?" to find out.
  • The Big Brain Theory: Leadership Lessons and a Real World Test
    On Discovery Channel's The Big Brain Theory, two groups of the brightest engineers in the world put their skills to the test solving wild mechanical problems. This week, they were asked to take on a job a little more serious - create a mechanism to safely stop a car that doesn't yield at a military checkpoint. To win the round, the car has to remain drive-able and the passengers unscathed.
  • Does Age Affect Productivity?
    Does productivity decline with age? A recent study suggests otherwise, claiming today's generation is actually earning less and not as likely to obtain as many academic credentials as workers older than 60. Boy, how times have changed.
  • Report Highlights Hidden STEM Economy
    Science, tech, engineering and math (STEM) careers justifiably get a lot of ink as critical to the economy, the driving force of the future. Half of all those jobs don't even require a bachelor's degree, which is good news for the majority of working-class adults. Yet public policy and public spending doesn't prioritize that half of the STEM workforce. Of the $4.7 billion of federal cash spent on job training, only a fifth of it goes toward training for jobs that don't require a bachelor's.
  • Is Diversity Declining in Top Professions?
    A half-century after the advent of affirmative action, diversity in the nation's top professions appears to be stagnating. An analysis by the New York Times includes startling figures showing that the percentage of black doctors and architects, to name a couple fields, has remained the same for two decades.
  • The 10 Toughest Jobs to Fill This Year
    Forty percent of employers in the U.S. have job vacancies, but can't find the skilled workers to fill them, according to the latest skills survey from staffing agency ManpowerGroup. For those of you hiding under a rock for the past half-decade, that's what we call the skills gap. The disparity between employers' need and workforce ability.
  • Fashion Models Strut Into U.S. More Easily Than Engineers
    If you're tall, thin, gorgeous and make a living off those traits it's easier to get an American work visa than university-trained engineers. A puzzling 20-year-old decision by Congress allowed models to be included in the H-1B class of visas, an oversight that has led to relatively preferential treatment for foreign-born beauty over brain.