ADVERTISEMENT
  • Need to Vent? BetterCompany Lets You Talk Anonymously About Work
    One of the trickiest and most annoying things you'll have to deal with in your career is office drama. One app aims to combat office politics by creating a "safe place" for co-workers to discuss work matters openly and honestly with one another, all while remaining anonymous. Read on to learn more (and where you can sign up).
  • 10 Female STEM Stars Under 30
    Women make up only 24 percent of the STEM workforce in the US, according to the Department of Commerce, and some fields are worse than others. Women represent only 14 percent of the country's engineers, but make up 47 percent of mathematicians and statisticians, 47 percent of life scientists, and 63 percent of social scientists. But as these rising stars of the tech industry show, women are making an impact on STEM. Given the impressive laundry list of accomplishments already made by all of the women on our list at such a young age, it's safe to say that both they and their careers are something to watch.
  • A Growing Crop of Female Versions of the Old Boy's Club Make Waves Online
    From T. Swift's smoking hot girl army to Tina Fey and Amy Poehler's whip-smart comic partnership, to Zooey Deschanel, Molly McAleer, and Sophia Rossi's infectious Hello Giggles girl-power lifestyle hub, female friendship-based collaborations are nothing new. What is new is the increasing number of collaboration-based opportunities that female professionals now have that can further their careers and actually put cash in the bank. A growing crop of increasingly specialized, made-for-women-by-women virtual communities like CodeChix and The Li.st offer opportunities that range from job referrals to speaking gigs to potential investors. Read on for a round-up of veterans and newcomers both big and small.
  • LinkedIn Is Being the Change It Wants to See for Women in Tech
    The bad news is that STEM has a woman problem. The good news is that everyone is pretty aware of it now and some companies are trying to fix this problem. Last year, LinkedIn announced its Women in Tech (WIT) initiative, which aims to empower the women in tech roles at the company to transform themselves, their careers, and the company – and, by golly, it seems to be working! We'll take a look at how LinkedIn is "tackling this imbalance head-on" and making a difference for women in tech, now and in the future.
  • What Nasty Gal Can Teach Us About the Importance of Corporate Culture
    If there's anyone who understands the term "rags to riches," it's Nasty Gal founder Sophia Amoruso, who built an online apparel empire from the ground up. However, according to some current and former Nasty Gal employees, the company's once-vibrant corporate culture isn't what it used to be, thanks to layoffs and restructuring. We'll examine how a company's culture can quickly go south and how to protect yourself from being blindsided in your career.
  • Pay It Forward: The CEO Giving Employees' Kids a Full Ride to College
    One CEO is taking employee benefits to the next level – the next generation, to be exact. Boxed CEO Chieh Huang is offering to pay college tuition for all of his employees' children as an incentive to remain loyal to the online wholesaler. Seem too good to be true?
  • STEM Is Important, But Let's Not Forget About the Humanities
    There's no doubt that advanced technology is the future, but just because studying STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) can lead to lucrative careers, doesn't mean that business no longer has any use for the humanities. We'll take a look at why society's obsession with STEM is blinding us to the importance of the more human side of business now and in the future.
  • Tweet Like a Man, and Get More Retweets
    A recent study showed that men get retweeted more than women. The question is, why? We'll examine the science behind why tweets published by men are, on average, more popular than those by women and how professionals can apply this knowledge to their enhance their career potential, regardless of gender.
  • New App Helps to Keep Your Online Image Clean
    Despite partying hard all throughout college, you somehow managed to graduate with decent grades and now you're on your way to paving a successful career path. Your partying days may be behind you now, but that doesn't mean they won't come back to haunt you when you least expect it – for instance, when you're trying to land your dream job. A simple Google search is all it takes for recruiters to dig up every humiliating photo that you've ever been tagged in on Facebook. Well, now a new app aims to prevent your past from ruining your chances of a brighter future.
  • Why Does the Gender Wage Gap Persist? [video]
    Recently, Pew Research Center released a short video to explain the findings from its gender wage gap study. The bottom line: although the gender wage gap has narrowed over time, it still exists. We'll take a look at how the wage gap affects the millions of hardworking women around the world who are required to work twice as hard to be considered half as good as their male co-workers.
  • How Hollywood's A-List Actresses Fight for Women's Equality
    Who better to bring awareness to a vital cause like women's equality than Hollywood stars? We'll take a look at how some of Hollywood's most revered actresses are speaking out about the inequality women face on- and off-screen, and the role the media plays in perpetuating this unconscious bias.
  • 3 Things Millennials Want, 3 Things They Could Do Without
    Born between 1980 and 2000, Millennials are the largest generation group in US history, comprising roughly 75.3 million of the nation's population and surpassing even the Baby Boomer generation. Needless to say, it's important to understand how this crowd thinks and functions, seeing the tremendous impact they have on the workplace and how it will evolve in the very near future. Here's a list of three things Millennials want in their lives, and three things they could simply do without … for now.
  • 5 Reasons Why STEM Has a Woman Problem
    How is it that science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) companies can find solutions for some of the world's most complex problems, but they can't seem to solve the gender bias issue that keeps women out of STEM careers? According to new research, it's because we, as a culture, don't know that there's even a problem – it's unconscious, and we're all to blame.
  • Employee Monitoring: Justifiable Security Measure or Overly Orwellian?
    Remember that time you worked yourself into a hypochondriac frenzy, and wound up spending the whole afternoon at the office surfing WebMD and trying to figure out if people get cholera anymore? As it turns out, Bill the IT guy — or even your CEO — may have been assessing your risks at the same time in a very different way for very different reasons.
  • Laid Off? This App Aims to Help You Beat Depression
    Social media has an amazing ability to connect people; however, with that comes both good and bad. The bad part is that anyone and everyone has the freedom to voice whatever opinion their little hearts desire, which promotes cyber bullying and allows other negativity to spread online. The good part is, the convenience and connectivity of social networks allow like-minded people to communicate, share, and help one another. One psychologist and MIT grad student, Robert Morris, used the positive aspects of social networking to formulate a site incorporating crowdsourced cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help users "debug" their negative thoughts and overcome depression.
  • 5 New Career Paths That Didn't Exist 10 Years Ago
    The workplace is changing, thanks to new technologies and new ways of thinking about work. If you're looking to venture into semi-uncharted territory in hopes of a brighter career trajectory, then you may want to consider one of these five new careers.
  • Odd Jobs: 5 Obscure Careers You May Want to Consider
    "So, what do you do for a living?" Nine times out of ten, this question is asked out of habit or courtesy. Very seldom do people expect an unusual answer. However, imagine what a nice change of pace it would be to hear someone respond with, "I dive for pearls in remote locations around the world" or "I design Barbie clothes." Here are five obscure careers that will definitely leave people wanting to know more.
  • What Your Tweets and Posts Tell Recruiters Could Keep You From Getting the Job
    Would you think twice about sharing a mindless "I'm so bored" post on social media if you knew that research shows that people who do so experience higher rates of heart attacks and strokes? What's worse, research that ties social media use to emotional stability/instability is making its way into the hands of people that you probably don't want to be privy to such information: recruiters, hiring managers, and employers. Here's what you need to know about what your social media sharing is saying about you.
  • 3 Ways to Successfully Market Your Expertise Online and Boost Your Career
    Don't you ever wish your dream career would just fall into your lap one day? Thanks to the majestic ways of the internet (and a little due diligence on your part), that fantasy could be a reality. Read on to see how marketing your expertise online can lead to bigger and better opportunities finding their way into your career.
  • Google Chairman Manterrupts Female Tech Leader at SXSW to Mansplain Need for Diversity in Tech
    "Mansplaining" is a term coined to describe the behavior of those men who have the need to explain what they believe are complex topics, in which they may or may not be well-versed, to women in a manner that is elementary enough for even a woman to understand. This very thing happened at SXSW this week, except this time, the "manterrupter" got called out publicly. Here's how it went down.