• New Research Shows That Diversity in Tech Is Getting Worse
    Top tech companies tried for years to keep their diversity numbers private, with a few even going so far as to start a lawsuit to prevent a reporter from investigating, claiming it could possibly hurt their companies if competitors got insight into their business practices.
  • The Robots Are Coming! 5 Jobs That Will Be Replaced in the Future
    If you're a working person, you probably already know that you're not indispensable. There's always someone coming up behind you on the ladder, with newer skills and lower salary expectations. In the future, however, you might not be competing solely with other humans. Jobs ranging from cleaning person to airline pilot could be taken over by robotics, reports Mashable, citing an Oxford Research prediction that 45 percent of U.S. jobs could be computer-automated by 2033.
  • Want an Insane Tech Internship Salary? Go Into STEM
    If you're a brilliant STEM-focused student close to graduating, good news: You could make as much or more than the median American household income as an intern for a tech company. According to the Census Bureau, for the average American, that was a little over $4,000 per month, or $51,371, in 2012.
  • What Uber Looks for in Employees
    Uber is one of those companies that everyone loves -- and at the same time, everyone loves to hate. The past few weeks, the company has been embroiled in a media frenzy, after Emil Michael, an Uber executive, made personal threats to a well-respected female tech journalist. After, Uber announced that Michael would not be fired.
  • Why Computer Engineer Barbie Might Be a Good Thing for Girls (Despite the Controversy)
    It’s no secret that women are underrepresented in STEM fields. Diversity reports from companies such as Google and Yahoo reveal dismal numbers. While the companies themselves need to work on encouraging women to apply for and stay in computer science jobs, society as a whole will have to do better at inspiring women and girls to pursue their interest in tech. One popular way of doing so has been to use toys as role models. But as the recent flap over Computer Engineer Barbie shows, you can't just slap a new coat of paint on an old, bad idea and call it equality.
  • Apple and Facebook to Pay for Female Employees to Freeze Eggs
    One of the biggest draws to working and tech startups is their lucrative benefits, from fully stocked snack rooms to flexible schedules. Many of the tech giants offer even better perks, such as on-site chefs, on-site doggy daycare, and generous stock options (which means that many early employees are doing quite well financially). Now, Facebook and Apple are offering employees a perk that might trump them all: both companies will pay female employees to freeze their eggs.
  • Is a Jobless Future a Good Thing?
    As technology advances and takes over menial jobs, will we lose jobs or create new ones? Some experts paint a rosy picture of the future in which society does not need as many jobs as we do today.
  • Don't Endorse This: LinkedIn Fails to Pay Employees Overtime, Forced to Issue $3.3M in Back Pay
    Ever put in extra hours at work, only for it to go unnoticed, unappreciated -- or perhaps even unpaid? If so, you might sympathize with 300 employees at LinkedIn, who recently received compensation for previously unpaid overtime.
  • Are Startups Using Culture as an Excuse to Exclude Women?
    There’s no shortage of startups these days, especially if you look at Silicon Valley. But old problems still remain, alongside potentially innovative new products and ideas. For instance, tech companies have a shockingly low amount of female employees … and may actively be recruiting men instead of women to create a certain type of “culture.”
  • How Colleges Are Attracting More Women to Computer Science
    One of the biggest problems facing the tech industry is the significant lack of women filling engineering roles at both large and small companies. For the past few years, experts have been debating the reasons why there are fewer women in tech, but recent data suggest this problem lies -- and can be fixed -- within our education system.
  • Which Tech Companies Are Hiring More Women?
    It’s no secret that women are severely outnumbered in tech companies in Silicon Valley. Recent reports indicate that women at both small and large employers such as Facebook and Google are barely represented, indicating this is a concerning trend in the technology sector. However, there are several other companies at which women are gaining ground, representing larger percentages of the workforce.
  • Amazon Has the Most Attractive Tech Workers

    The makers of Hinge, a dating app that stresses professional affiliations as well as social connections, says that users swipe right for Amazon employees 14.2 percent above the average -- more than Apple, Google, or Facebook, whose network they use to validate user identity. (Ouch.)

  • Google Still Searching for Diversity
    After Google recently released their workforce statistics, it was a pretty clear that white males comprise a majority of the company. The news is not surprising, as it reflects a problem that plagues most of Silicon Valley.
  • Choose the Best Passwords at Work or Anywhere Else

    Yesterday, eBay announced that the encrypted passwords and personal details of all 233 million of its users had been compromised in one of the largest security breaches of all time. What does that have to do with you at work? Well, if you use the same password for multiple accounts, as many people do, this or any other hacking incident could expose more than just your personal information: it could compromise your accounts at work, leading to potential security threats for your employer and career fallout for you.

  • PayScale Unaffected By Heartbleed Bug
    The Heartbleed bug that has likely been giving many website IT departments heartburn as they attempt to scramble to implement a fix fortunately did not impact usernames or passwords on PayScale.com or any of its compensation products for businesses like PayScale MarketRate™, PayScale Insight™, and PayScale Insight Expert™. Your PayScale passwords are safe and do not need to be changed.
  • Employees 'Recalled' Mozilla's Former CEO

    Brendan Eich lasted two weeks as CEO of Mozilla before pressure from employees led to his resignation. The reason for that pressure? Eich's $1,000 donation to California's Proposition 8, a 2008 ballot initiative that banned gay marriage in the state.

  • Does Wearable Tech Have a Place in the Office?
    Fitbits. Google Glass. Jawbones. These are all devices and gadgets you've likely heard of, and they're wearables that are changing the way millions of people live their life. Many of these people wear these devices all day long -- even bringing them into the office.
  • Employer Access to Social Media Accounts: What Does Your State Say?
    The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCLS) keeps tabs on what's new in each of the 50 states. Beginning in 2012, some state lawmakers introduced legislation protecting employees from being required to give up their social media account passwords in order to get or keep a job. And some states included laws preventing colleges and universities from requiring student passwords.
  • Do You Have One of the Hottest Jobs of 2014?
    US News recent released its list of the 100 best jobs of 2014. We will take a look at which jobs are in the top ten, so read on to see if your profession made the cut.
  • 10 Popular Twitter Hashtags for Job Seekers to Follow
    Hiring managers are beginning to veer away from conventional methods of advertising job vacancies, and they are, instead, turning to social media to locate qualified candidates. Their weapon of choice? A little thing known as a hashtag. See how hashtags are a candidate’s best friend when it comes to finding a job in today’s digital age.