• For the First Time Ever, Computer Science Is the Most Popular Major for Women at Stanford
    There's no reason to beat around the bush or sugarcoat it: STEM has a woman problem and it has for a while now. However, here's a bit of good news: Stanford University recently announced that, for the first time in the university's history, computer science is the top major for female students this year. Yeah, you read that right.
  • What You Tweet Reflects Your Income, Emotions, and More
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania recently released a first-of-its-kind study that shows that they can reliably link twitter feeds to income, based on the content of the tweets. Why you should be concerned? Your next employer may be searching Twitter, and you may not like what they find.
  • These Might Be the 5 Coolest Offices in the US (and Canada)
    PayScale recently gave readers a look inside some of the coolest offices around the globe. After conducting extensive research and drooling over countless worthy contenders, we narrowed the list to a handful of creative and unusual spaces, including the live orange grove of Google Tel Aviv, the James Bond-esque Cold War bunker offices of Swedish Internet provider, Bahnhof, and the vintage carousel horses at Ogilvy & Mather's Guanghzou, China outpost. To follow up on our list of incredible office spaces abroad, we compiled the following stateside edition outlining the most unbelievable offices right here in the U. S. of A. (and one in Canada). Prepare for a major case of office envy — the only antidote to which is the solace you can take from knowing how hard it must be to get actual work done in offices this cool.
  • Cards Against Humanity's Most Surprising Move Yet
    There's a lot of bad news out there, and we seem to love to talk about it. In fact, sometimes we make things out to be a lot worse than they are. As Nicholas Kristof recently pointed out, our current political climate causes us to ignore the positive strides the world is making every day. In that light, let's take this opportunity to laud a shining example of corporate philanthropy in a place you probably wouldn't expect it: a naughty card game.
  • More Tech Companies Cast a Net for Diversity Leaders
    A new wave of tech companies has started to publicly prioritize diversity by giving it its own job title. Many of tech's big guns, including Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, Apple, and Google already consider diversity efforts worthy of an in-house point person, according to HR Dive.
  • The Controversial Maternity Leaves of Marissa Mayer
    Yahoo's CEO Marissa Mayer plans to take limited time away after giving birth to her twins. She's a high-powered businesswoman, and she's done this before. (This is her second pregnancy, and she took just two weeks off last time.) Is she a heroine, someone we should all look up to – or is she part of the problem?
  • Report: Technology Is Creating Jobs, Not Eliminating Them
    A recent Deloitte study based on 140 years of England and Wales census data found that technology has produced more new jobs than made existing ones obsolete. This is particularly true of "caring" occupations that require cognitive thinking, such as nurses and teachers, as opposed to "muscle power" occupations, such as weavers and metal-makers, which are more easily replaced by machinery. In other words, as long as we have brains and do our best to maximize their potential, we may not need to be terrified that we will be replaced by robots. While it's important to keep in mind that the Deloitte economists' assessment is limited to the U.K. workforce and thus not necessarily indicative of larger global trends, the study's findings do paint an overall rosier picture of technology's impact on human-occupied occupations in comparison to other recent studies.
  • 7 Tips for Young Women Who Aspire to Be Leaders
    While some girls are busy dreaming about their wedding day, others are fantasizing about being the next Sheryl Sandberg or Mary Barra. For the ambitious, here's some advice to support you in your endeavors and encourage you to become the leader you are truly meant to be.
  • Are Tech Jobs Just Crazy Hard on Workers?
    The short answer is "yes." It's also "no" and "it depends." The recent New York Times critique of Amazon's work culture — the most commented-on piece in the publication's history — has resulted in a firestorm of both backlash and support from the media and tech titans. Former and current Amazon employees have chimed in, sharing views and experiences that both support and negate the Times' claim that Amazon is a company guilty of "conducting an experiment in how far it can push white-collar workers to get them to achieve its ever-expanding ambitions."
  • 5 Inspiring Quotes From Young Female Entrepreneurs
    "Anything you can do, I can do better. I can do anything better than you." There are two types of women in the world: those who find those lyrics conceited and arrogant, and those who see those words as fuel to catapult them towards their dreams. In this post, we'll cover five young female entrepreneurs who believed they could do anything better … and did. Here are some of their inspiring words about breaking down barriers and stereotypes to turn their little ideas into big, big business.
  • These Might Be the 5 Coolest Offices in the World
    Imagine a work world in which the PowerPoint presentation for your weekly team meeting was projected from a vintage carousel horse, a midday snack meant plucking an orange from an indoor grove near your desk, or your daily commute required traveling 100 feet underground to a former nuclear war bunker submerged beneath a mountain via tunnel. For workers employed by the companies that made our list of five of the world's most ogle-worthy offices, these seeming fantasies are actual realities of a typical day at the office.
  • Here's Why Millennials Want to Work Part-Time
    New studies show that millennials are choosing to stay out of Corporate America and opting for smaller companies that value employees and offer more flexibility. We'll take a look at why millennials prefer freedom and purpose (over money) in their careers, and figure out how the heck they're still able to afford pretty enviable lifestyles.
  • Need to Vent? BetterCompany Lets You Talk Anonymously About Work
    One of the trickiest and most annoying things you'll have to deal with in your career is office drama. One app aims to combat office politics by creating a "safe place" for co-workers to discuss work matters openly and honestly with one another, all while remaining anonymous. Read on to learn more (and where you can sign up).
  • 10 Female STEM Stars Under 30
    Women make up only 24 percent of the STEM workforce in the US, according to the Department of Commerce, and some fields are worse than others. Women represent only 14 percent of the country's engineers, but make up 47 percent of mathematicians and statisticians, 47 percent of life scientists, and 63 percent of social scientists. But as these rising stars of the tech industry show, women are making an impact on STEM. Given the impressive laundry list of accomplishments already made by all of the women on our list at such a young age, it's safe to say that both they and their careers are something to watch.
  • A Growing Crop of Female Versions of the Old Boy's Club Make Waves Online
    From T. Swift's smoking hot girl army to Tina Fey and Amy Poehler's whip-smart comic partnership, to Zooey Deschanel, Molly McAleer, and Sophia Rossi's infectious Hello Giggles girl-power lifestyle hub, female friendship-based collaborations are nothing new. What is new is the increasing number of collaboration-based opportunities that female professionals now have that can further their careers and actually put cash in the bank. A growing crop of increasingly specialized, made-for-women-by-women virtual communities like CodeChix and The offer opportunities that range from job referrals to speaking gigs to potential investors. Read on for a round-up of veterans and newcomers both big and small.
  • LinkedIn Is Being the Change It Wants to See for Women in Tech
    The bad news is that STEM has a woman problem. The good news is that everyone is pretty aware of it now and some companies are trying to fix this problem. Last year, LinkedIn announced its Women in Tech (WIT) initiative, which aims to empower the women in tech roles at the company to transform themselves, their careers, and the company – and, by golly, it seems to be working! We'll take a look at how LinkedIn is "tackling this imbalance head-on" and making a difference for women in tech, now and in the future.
  • What Nasty Gal Can Teach Us About the Importance of Corporate Culture
    If there's anyone who understands the term "rags to riches," it's Nasty Gal founder Sophia Amoruso, who built an online apparel empire from the ground up. However, according to some current and former Nasty Gal employees, the company's once-vibrant corporate culture isn't what it used to be, thanks to layoffs and restructuring. We'll examine how a company's culture can quickly go south and how to protect yourself from being blindsided in your career.
  • Pay It Forward: The CEO Giving Employees' Kids a Full Ride to College
    One CEO is taking employee benefits to the next level – the next generation, to be exact. Boxed CEO Chieh Huang is offering to pay college tuition for all of his employees' children as an incentive to remain loyal to the online wholesaler. Seem too good to be true?
  • STEM Is Important, But Let's Not Forget About the Humanities
    There's no doubt that advanced technology is the future, but just because studying STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) can lead to lucrative careers, doesn't mean that business no longer has any use for the humanities. We'll take a look at why society's obsession with STEM is blinding us to the importance of the more human side of business now and in the future.
  • Tweet Like a Man, and Get More Retweets
    A recent study showed that men get retweeted more than women. The question is, why? We'll examine the science behind why tweets published by men are, on average, more popular than those by women and how professionals can apply this knowledge to their enhance their career potential, regardless of gender.

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