• Is Hillary Clinton Right That Americans Haven't Had a Raise in 15 Years?
    During last night's Democratic presidential debate in Milwaukee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said, "I know a lot of Americans are angry about the economy. And for good cause. Americans haven't had a raise in 15 years. There aren't enough good-paying jobs, especially for young people. And yes, the economy is rigged in favor of those at the top." Rigged economy aside, was she correct in saying that Americans haven't seen an increase in pay since the turn of the last century?
  • The 4 Worst Cities to Find a Job
    The unemployment rate is down for the country at large, but the recovery has been pretty spotty and these rates vary widely state-to-state. It's important that folks looking for work understand the landscape of the current job market, so that they can make the best decisions for their futures. Recently, WalletHub released their report on 2016's Best and Worst Cities to Find a Job.
  • 62 People Have as Much Wealth as the Poorer Half of the World's Population
    Worldwide, the rich are definitely getting richer. How bad is it? A recent Oxfam report, An Economy for the 1%, highlights just how stark wealth inequality has grown across the globe. Let's take a look at some of the highlights from the report and learn why the growing gulf between rich and poor is bad for everyone.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 151,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Dips to 4.9 Percent
    The monthly Employment Situation Summary, released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed the addition of 151,000 jobs to public and private, non-farm payrolls, and an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, the lowest in eight years. Prior to the release, economists were predicting the addition of 190,000 jobs. In a mixed report, however, the real good news is wage growth.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 205,000 Jobs in January
    The ADP National Employment Report beat expectations again this month, reflecting the addition of 205,000 jobs to private payrolls from December to January, according to the payroll processor. Prior to the release of the report, economists polled by Reuters were predicting average gains of 195,000 jobs.
  • Is Obamacare 'the Biggest Job-Killer in This Country'?
    During last night's seventh Republican debate, Sen. Ted Cruz said: "... we have seen now in six years of Obamacare that it has been a disaster. It is the biggest job-killer in this country. Millions of Americans have lost their jobs, have been forced into part-time work, have lost their health insurance, have lost their doctors, have seen their premiums skyrocket." If elected, he said, he would "repeal every word of Obamacare" – which would be a worthy goal, if Obamacare were really the job-killer Cruz claims it is. But is it?
  • What You Need to Know About Obama's Wage Insurance Proposal
    In his State of the Union address earlier this month, President Obama called for "a system of wage insurance" to make sure that Americans who lose their jobs and take new ones for lower wages can still pay their bills. Here's how this plan, should it come to fruition, might affect you.
  • Democratic Town Hall in Iowa: The Candidates' Answers to Questions on Jobs
    As we get closer to the election, the primary races start to feel more like a boxing match. The Democrats are less likely to throw blows at one another than the candidates in the wider Republican field, but they do fall into the kind of media caricatures that feel more appropriate for professional athletes. You can even imagine what would be painted on their boxing robes: Bernie Sanders, the Heart; Hillary Clinton, the Head; Martin O'Malley, the Dark Horse. Last night's CNN Iowa Democratic Presidential Town Hall allowed the candidates to speak slightly more in depth, and try to get beyond the sound bites by answering voters' questions directly.
  • Fair Pay and Healthcare: 4 Takeaways From the 4th Democratic Debate
    Watching the latest Democratic debate less than a week after the Republican debate, you're immediately struck by the differences between the two parties' events at this stage of the election cycle. It's not just the unsurprising fact that conservatives and liberals disagree on the major issues; it's that the Democrats, who have only three candidates vying for the nomination, have enough time to get into (slightly) more in-depth discussions about their proposals. Barring that, they've at least got more room, both metaphorically and physically on the stage, to argue with one another.
  • Jobs and Wage Growth in the 6th Top-Tier Republican Debate
    Last night's Republican debate in South Carolina started off with a question about jobs, and the economy and the job market dominated the discussion at many points during the night. Pretty much the only point all the candidates admit to agreeing on is that they disagree with President Obama's assertion, made in the State of the Union address earlier in the week, that the "United States of America, right now, has the strongest, most durable economy in the world."
  • #BigBlockofCheeseDay: Jobs, the Gender Pay Gap, Family Leave, and More
    If you love cheese and you love politics, today is your day on Twitter. OK, fine, the cheese part is just a fun historical reference, wrapped up in a hashtag; Big Block of Cheese Day, first coined on the show The West Wing, dates back to an open house held by President Andrew Jackson in 1837. The reception was Jackson's last in office, and featured a 1,400-pound wheel of cheese and 10,000 guests from the general public. Today, of course, we don't need fromage and an open door to speak to our government directly – we just need Twitter. For the third year in a row, advisors like Vice President Biden and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez took to Twitter to answer the public's questions.
  • #SOTU 2016: American Anxiety, the Changing Economy, and Your Career
    "Anyone claiming that America's economy is in decline is peddling fiction," President Obama said in his last State of the Union Address on Tuesday night. "Now, what is true – and the reason that a lot of Americans feel anxious – is that the economy has been changing in profound ways, changes that started long before the Great Recession hit, changes that have not let up." If you've struggled to find momentum in your career in the last eight or nine years, or even just to stay employed, that won't come as a shock. The question is, what can be done to help American workers weather the change and adapt?
  • BLS Jobs Report Surprises: 292,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Steady at 5 Percent
    After Wednesday's National Employment Report from ADP exceeded expectations by more than 60,000 jobs, it would have been disappointing if this morning's report from the Labor Department showed numbers that were merely in line with economists' predictions. Never fear: while economists polled by Reuters were looking for the addition of 195,000 jobs to nonfarm payrolls, the Employment Situation Summary reflected a blockbuster 292,000 added jobs. In addition, the previous two month's numbers were revised upward by a combined 50,000 jobs.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 257,000 Jobs in December
    Who would have thought that the last month of the year would show the most jobs added to private payrolls? Certainly, this morning's National Employment Report from payroll processor ADP took economists by surprise: those polled by Reuters were predicting the addition of 192,000 jobs, far below the actual number of 257,000 jobs.
  • Why 'Full Employment' Isn't the Whole Picture of the Job Market
    In November, the unemployment rate officially hit 5 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the rate many economists use to mark "full employment." But as Nelson D. Schwartz wrote at The New York Times, "The slack that built up in the labor market after the recession ... has changed traditional calculations of how far unemployment can fall before the job market tightens and the risk of inflation rises." In other words, on economic or personal level, that 5 percent unemployment marker might not mean what it used to mean.
  • The 12 Jobs Projected to Grow 30 Percent By 2024
    Recently, the Bureau of Labor Statistics updated their Occupational Outlook Handbook to reflect projected job growth from 2014-2024. The updated Handbook is essential reading for anyone who's thinking about changing careers in the next few years, and wants to make sure that there are jobs waiting for them on the other side of retraining.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 211,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Holds at 5 Percent
    The monthly Employment Situation Summary, which measures jobs added to both public and private, non-farm payrolls, reflected the addition of 211,000 jobs in November and an unchanged unemployment rate of 5 percent. This was higher than the 200,000 jobs predicted by economists polled by Reuters ahead of the Department of Labor's release. In addition, the previous two month's numbers were revised upward, by +18,000 jobs for October and +8,000 jobs for September, respectively.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 217,000 Jobs in November
    Prior to the release of the ADP National Employment Report for November, economists polled by Reuters were predicting the addition of 190,000 jobs to private payrolls. This morning's report beat expectations and offered some more good news as well: last month's report, which previously reflected the addition of 182,000 jobs, was revised upward to show 196,000 jobs added.
  • The Cities With the Lowest Unemployment Rates
    A variety of factors contribute to our understanding regarding the current state of the economy. It's not a simple issue. One indicator stands out though as especially significant, at least as far as many working Americans are concerned: unemployment rates. And, this fall, it seems we've been getting some good news.
  • The 5 Best Cities for Veterans
    Veterans make up about 7.5 percent of the workforce in the U.S., and have an unemployment rate of 3.9 percent, according to last month's report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics – more than a full percentage point lower than the 5 percent unemployment rate for the country as a whole. In fact, last month's data reflects a seven-year low for veterans' unemployment. But not all U.S. cities are created equal, when it comes to employment opportunities and quality of life for veterans.

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