• #ThisPsychMajor Agrees With Jeb Bush — Sort Of
    At a recent town hall event, Jeb Bush said that psych majors "end up working at Chick-fil-A." He went on to add that, "I just don't think people are getting jobs as psych majors." As a fully employed former psychology major, I have to say I resent that. In fact, I've written before on how to turn your psych major into a lucrative career, demonstrating that it's entirely possible to find employment outside the retail sector. But that doesn't mean that getting a job with a bachelor's in psychology is easy.
  • Justin Trudeau and 5 Other Successful English Majors
    On October 19, Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party won a decisive victory in the Canadian national election. The prime-minister designate assumes office in November, and has already started movement on his campaign promises, but even if you don't care about Canadian politics (or any politics) there are a few interesting things to note about Canada's next prime minister. For starters, liberal arts majors can rejoice, because Trudeau has, among other degrees, a bachelor's in English literature from McGill. There's an answer, the next time your parents ask you, "What are you going to do with that English degree?"
  • Is Getting Into an Elite School the Only Way to Define Success?
    Upon entering high school, I was under the impression that my life would resemble that of Marissa Cooper from The OC, coming home past my curfew because I was out with a cute boy or getting into some shenanigans with my best gal pals. If we ignore the blatant reality that I was not a wealthy, blonde teenager (who was obviously at least 25), my high school experience was still vastly different from the one depicted on the television programs I watched. In retrospect, I believe my high school experience more closely resembles Olivia Pope's narrative on Scandal; I was constantly under pressure to appear perfect.
  • How to Avoid Defaulting on Your Student Loans
    Over 67 percent of college seniors had taken out student loans as of the 2011-12 academic year, according to The National Center for Education Statistics. That same year, the student loan default rate reached 10 percent. Obviously, no one enters school planning on defaulting on their student loans – defaulting can ruin your credit, impacting everything from your ability to get a mortgage or a car loan to getting hired for your dream job. PayScale's College Salary Report shows how college choice affects ability to earn enough to pay back loans; to help students avoid common mistakes when taking out their first loans, we spoke via email with Anne Del Plato, Regional Director for U-fi Student Loans.
  • How Financial Aid Affects College Cost and ROI By Household Income
    This weekend, President Obama rolled out new Department of Education initiatives aimed at increasing the number of students who attend college and graduate without unmanageable student loan debt. Among them: College Scorecard, an assessment tool that allows students and their families to choose potential colleges based on factors like average annual cost, graduation rate, and salary after attending. PayScale is using this data to add another layer to our College ROI Report, showing how income level affects college ROI.
  • The 5 Best Graduate Degrees By Salary
    A graduate degree isn't a guarantee, either of employment or high earnings. For one thing, not all graduate degrees are created equal. Some fields obviously grow more than others, and may or may not reward candidates with advanced degrees on their CVs. Some occupations require licensure to practice, or set the barrier of entry at a certain educational level. To help you figure out whether going back to school is in your best interests, this year's College Salary Report ranks the top graduate degrees by earnings.
  • #College2Career: Sasha Pasulka on Why You Should Get an Internship – Even If You Don't Want To
    All work and no play makes for a dull life and possibly an uninspired career, but sometimes, you have to sacrifice the occasional pool party in order to score a career-defining internship. Sasha Pasulka, Director, Audience Product Marketing at Tableau Software, spoke with PayScale for a special feature on forging a path from college to career, and shared that advice, plus a few other valuable tips. Among them: listen to your aunt, especially if she's a recruiter, and pay attention to what you loved when you were 12 years old. You never know when you'll discover the perfect career path.
  • #College2Career: Dallas Tester on Partnering With Professors to Find Career Opportunities
    College choice isn't career destiny, no matter what your high school guidance counselor might've told you. When it comes to building a career, the opportunities you take while you're going to school can be just as important as the name of the institution on your diploma. PayScale's College Salary Report ranks the colleges and universities whose graduates go on to high-paying careers, but the big surprise is how many "non-brand-name" schools make the list. Developer Evangelist Dallas Tester tells us why college reputation isn't a blueprint for graduates' career paths.
  • The 5 Best Party Schools By Salary Potential
    Just because students love to party, doesn't mean they're trading keggers today for career opportunities tomorrow. PayScale uses The Princeton Review's list of party schools as a jumping-off place, and then ranks them according to the median pay of their graduates at early and mid-career. To make Princeton's list, schools must have a high percentage of students who report seeing frequent drug and alcohol use at their schools, a very active Greek system, not too many hours per day devoted to study.
  • #College2Career:  Sarah Fenske on Why Unpaid Internships Are Worth It
    One of the biggest challenges for entering college students is finding time to do everything they need to do, in order to prepare for a successful career after graduation. As part of PayScale's College Salary Report, we asked several successful people to tell us how they bridged the gap between choosing a major and graduating to a satisfying career. For Sarah Fenske, Editor in Chief of the Riverfront Times and graduate of The College of Wooster, the answer was simple: gain work experience, in any way possible.
  • These Are the 10 Most Meaningful College Majors
    Salary is important; no matter how much you love your job, you're probably not going to be happy if you're stressed about paying the bills. Beyond a certain point, however, more money doesn't necessarily equal more happiness. For this reason, it's a good idea for entering college students to consider meaning as well as money when choosing a major.
  • The 5 Highest Paying Bachelor's (and Associate!) Degrees
    Very few students choose their major from a list of top-paying degrees. Even if financial considerations are paramount in your decision process, you'll probably start by examining your strengths and interests. In other words, you might not choose your major for love, exactly, but you don't want to sink time, effort, and money preparing for a career you won't enjoy. That said, there's value in knowing which degrees are most likely to net high-paying jobs for their recipients. PayScale's College Salary Report ranks the highest paying associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees – because no matter what you decide, knowing is better than not knowing.
  • Small Student Loan Debt, Big Problem?
    When it comes to personal finances, everything is relative. What seems expensive to one person is cheap to another, depending on their income stream, debt, and attitudes about money; this is true when we're talking about pocket money, but it's even truer when the subject is student loan debt. The tendency is to talk about debt as if borrowing less is always better. This makes sense at first glance – who would want to borrow more, if they could avoid it? But as Susan Dynarski points outs at The Upshot, borrowing less money isn't necessarily a recipe for career success – or even avoiding default.
  • #College2Career: Kelly Eagen on Why College Major Isn't Career Destiny
    Choosing a major is invested with a mythic kind of importance, as if it were the first step on the path to inevitable career success or failure. But, if that were the case, every pre-law student student would go on to be a lawyer, and every English major would either write the Great American Novel or go on to live, penniless, in a garret. The actual truth is that while choice of major is important, it's not the end-all, be-all of career prep during college. PayScale's College Salary Report offers the information prospective students need to pick the right major, program, and school for their particular goals and needs; stories like this one offer perspective on how to use that information.
  • What Sets the Top Engineering Schools Apart? Not Just STEM.
    At first glance, the list of top colleges in PayScale's 2016 College Salary Report looks like a love letter to STEM degrees. Not only do science, technology, engineering, and math subjects dominate the list of highest-paid majors by any degree level, there is an undeniable correlation between how high a college or university ranks and the percentage of STEM degrees they grant. But, as anybody who passed a basic statistics class knows, correlation is not causation. A closer examination reveals that what separates the very best STEM-focused colleges from the rest is that they encourage students to branch out beyond a traditional STEM curriculum. By examining what drives the success of the highest-earning college graduates, we can all learn a valuable career lesson and increase our own earning potential.
  • Does College Major Matter?
    If you went by the amount of attention it receives during the college selection process, choice of major would be the most important decision you ever made in your life, right up there with whom you marry and whether to choose a city based on its most popular food product. (For the record, Philadelphians, you might be on to something with the cheesesteak.) The real question, of course, is does major matter more than other factors?
  • How to Avoid Having to Sell Your Diploma on eBay
    We live in a very strange world, in which going to college can feel like more of a gamble than hitting the blackjack table at Vegas. How can you really be sure that all your hard-earned – and more to the point, hard-borrowed – dollars are going to an investment that will pay off? More on that in a minute, but first: meet Stephanie Ritter, a college graduate whose underemployment situation got so dire, she decided to put her diploma up on eBay, at a price tag of $50,000, to defray the cost of her loans.
  • #College2Career: Dianne Juhl on the Limits of Traditional Education
    When it comes to choosing a major and making other career-defining decisions during college, Dianne Juhl, CEO and Founder of The Feminine Face of Money, describes herself as a probable outlier. "My choices were totally driven by my financial needs, ambition, and career vision," she says.
  • Introducing the 2015-2016 PayScale College Salary Report
    Money isn't everything, but when student loan debt tops $1 trillion and college tuition grows more expensive every year, prospective college students should think about factoring in future earnings, when they make their college choice. PayScale's College Salary Report ranks two-year and four-year colleges and universities, plus majors for all degree levels, and shows which programs are likely to result in high earnings after graduation.
  • Want a 'Good' Job? Go to College
    According to a study conducted by Georgetown University, the job market is recovering, at least as far as low-paying and high-paying jobs are concerned. Between 2010 and 2014, the economy created 6.6 million jobs, and 2.9 million "good" jobs — or those that are defined by a median salary of $42,700 per year. The trouble is: 98 percent of those good jobs went to workers who earned at least a bachelor's degree.

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)

Comp Managers: Start Here »