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  • Report: Technology Is Creating Jobs, Not Eliminating Them
    A recent Deloitte study based on 140 years of England and Wales census data found that technology has produced more new jobs than made existing ones obsolete. This is particularly true of "caring" occupations that require cognitive thinking, such as nurses and teachers, as opposed to "muscle power" occupations, such as weavers and metal-makers, which are more easily replaced by machinery. In other words, as long as we have brains and do our best to maximize their potential, we may not need to be terrified that we will be replaced by robots. While it's important to keep in mind that the Deloitte economists' assessment is limited to the U.K. workforce and thus not necessarily indicative of larger global trends, the study's findings do paint an overall rosier picture of technology's impact on human-occupied occupations in comparison to other recent studies.
  • Are Tech Jobs Just Crazy Hard on Workers?
    The short answer is "yes." It's also "no" and "it depends." The recent New York Times critique of Amazon's work culture — the most commented-on piece in the publication's history — has resulted in a firestorm of both backlash and support from the media and tech titans. Former and current Amazon employees have chimed in, sharing views and experiences that both support and negate the Times' claim that Amazon is a company guilty of "conducting an experiment in how far it can push white-collar workers to get them to achieve its ever-expanding ambitions."
  • Adobe Offers More Paid Parental Leave
    Netflix and Microsoft have already paved the way, but now Adobe announced that it's joining the other top tech companies in offering more paid leave to parents. Their leave package is now at 26 weeks (10 weeks of medical leaven and 16 weeks of parental leave) – that's double what they offered in the past, but it's not even really a surprise.
  • 5 Inspiring Quotes From Young Female Entrepreneurs
    "Anything you can do, I can do better. I can do anything better than you." There are two types of women in the world: those who find those lyrics conceited and arrogant, and those who see those words as fuel to catapult them towards their dreams. In this post, we'll cover five young female entrepreneurs who believed they could do anything better … and did. Here are some of their inspiring words about breaking down barriers and stereotypes to turn their little ideas into big, big business.
  • Here's Why Millennials Want to Work Part-Time
    New studies show that millennials are choosing to stay out of Corporate America and opting for smaller companies that value employees and offer more flexibility. We'll take a look at why millennials prefer freedom and purpose (over money) in their careers, and figure out how the heck they're still able to afford pretty enviable lifestyles.
  • Interactive Map Shows the Location of Most Jobs in the US
    Robert Manduca, a PhD student studying sociology and social policy at Harvard, has created an interactive map that plots 96 percent of the jobs in America according to category and location.
  • Need to Vent? BetterCompany Lets You Talk Anonymously About Work
    One of the trickiest and most annoying things you'll have to deal with in your career is office drama. One app aims to combat office politics by creating a "safe place" for co-workers to discuss work matters openly and honestly with one another, all while remaining anonymous. Read on to learn more (and where you can sign up).
  • 5 Bad Habits That Waste Your Day Away (and What to Do About Them)
    Ever wonder why some people are hyper-productive and others are always playing catch-up? If you're part of the latter group, then you're probably guilty of productivity-destroying behaviors. Learn how to kick those bad habits, so you can stop wondering why there are never enough hours in a day.
  • Women Study Computer Science, So Why Are There So Few Women in Tech?
    Recent studies show that a vast majority of female students are interested enough in tech to study it in college, however, the number of women in tech careers doesn't reflect that – not even by a long shot. Let's take a look at why so many women fall off the tech career path before even choosing a major.
  • 4 Ways Finances Affect Women Differently Than Men in Their Careers
    It's a fact. Women are more likely to discuss health issues than financial matters, but the reason why isn't as obvious as you may think. Yes, women tend to be more open about personal stuff than men, but the reason they refrain from money talks is because they feel insecure about their "lack of financial knowledge and experience," and don't know "where to turn for guidance," says a recent study. Let's take a look at four factors that contribute to the financial insecurities that are unique to women in their careers.
  • Overtime for Checking Email? Under Obama's Expanded Overtime Rule, Maybe
    Recently, President Obama announced new rules for overtime pay, which will raise the floor to just over $50,000 and cover nearly 5 million American workers. While you may have heard about the rule change, you might not be aware how that could affect your technology usage, particularly checking emails after hours.
  • How to Tell If It's Time to Switch Careers
    Are you contemplating whether now's the right time to switch careers? If so, then you should know that there's a right way to change careers, and a wrong way. Here's what you need to know to ensure that you are well prepared to make a seamless transition into your new dream career, sooner than later.
  • LinkedIn Is Being the Change It Wants to See for Women in Tech
    The bad news is that STEM has a woman problem. The good news is that everyone is pretty aware of it now and some companies are trying to fix this problem. Last year, LinkedIn announced its Women in Tech (WIT) initiative, which aims to empower the women in tech roles at the company to transform themselves, their careers, and the company – and, by golly, it seems to be working! We'll take a look at how LinkedIn is "tackling this imbalance head-on" and making a difference for women in tech, now and in the future.
  • What Nasty Gal Can Teach Us About the Importance of Corporate Culture
    If there's anyone who understands the term "rags to riches," it's Nasty Gal founder Sophia Amoruso, who built an online apparel empire from the ground up. However, according to some current and former Nasty Gal employees, the company's once-vibrant corporate culture isn't what it used to be, thanks to layoffs and restructuring. We'll examine how a company's culture can quickly go south and how to protect yourself from being blindsided in your career.
  • STEM Is Important, But Let's Not Forget About the Humanities
    There's no doubt that advanced technology is the future, but just because studying STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) can lead to lucrative careers, doesn't mean that business no longer has any use for the humanities. We'll take a look at why society's obsession with STEM is blinding us to the importance of the more human side of business now and in the future.
  • Tweet Like a Man, and Get More Retweets
    A recent study showed that men get retweeted more than women. The question is, why? We'll examine the science behind why tweets published by men are, on average, more popular than those by women and how professionals can apply this knowledge to their enhance their career potential, regardless of gender.
  • New App Helps to Keep Your Online Image Clean
    Despite partying hard all throughout college, you somehow managed to graduate with decent grades and now you're on your way to paving a successful career path. Your partying days may be behind you now, but that doesn't mean they won't come back to haunt you when you least expect it – for instance, when you're trying to land your dream job. A simple Google search is all it takes for recruiters to dig up every humiliating photo that you've ever been tagged in on Facebook. Well, now a new app aims to prevent your past from ruining your chances of a brighter future.
  • Hillary Clinton Fights Like a Woman for Paid Leave
    It was Mother's Day on Sunday, so it's probably not really surprising that Hillary Clinton released a video about her mother (and daughter and granddaughter). But, set against the birth of her granddaughter, she also briefly retells a story about a nurse who said, "Thank you for fighting for paid family leave." Is it just political posturing, or can we finally hope for some resolution to the shameful state of family leave in the U.S.?
  • The High Cost of College Is Leaving Many Students Out in the Cold
    College should be one of the most memorable times in a person's life, not a time of financial stress, anxiety, and hopelessness. However, with the rising cost of attending college and student loan debt more than quadrupling over the past two decades, obtaining a degree is proving to be a strain, especially for students who are financially burdened. One group of low-income students from Columbia University is using social media to shed light on the dismal realities of being a poor student in one of the most prestigious and expensive Ivy League schools in the nation, with a Facebook page entitled Columbia University Class Confessions.
  • 3 Things Millennials Want, 3 Things They Could Do Without
    Born between 1980 and 2000, Millennials are the largest generation group in US history, comprising roughly 75.3 million of the nation's population and surpassing even the Baby Boomer generation. Needless to say, it's important to understand how this crowd thinks and functions, seeing the tremendous impact they have on the workplace and how it will evolve in the very near future. Here's a list of three things Millennials want in their lives, and three things they could simply do without … for now.