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  • Want Your Kids to Be Successful? Don't Quit Your Day Job, Says Harvard Study
    Listen up, working moms. It's time to put your guilt-ridden thoughts aside and start celebrating the fact that you are a mother with a thriving career, because children of working moms are more successful than their peers. Says who? Harvard Business School, that's who. Here's what you need to know.
  • Everyone Needs Work-Life Balance, Not Just Women
    A national conversation around the issue of work-life balance has really taken root lately, and it has everyone talking about what can be done to better things moving forward. However, when we think about work-life balance, we should be mindful that it's an important issue for all adults – not just women. Here are some things to think about.
  • Women Apologize Too Much. Here's How to Stop.
    When you're a kid, the message about apologies is clear: when you're wrong – or even if you hurt someone by mistake – say you're sorry. The problem is, as kids grow into adults, one half of the human race seems to retain the message ... while the other half reserves their apologies for special occasions. (You know which is which.) Why, exactly, do women feel that they must apologize all the time, and how can they curb the impulse, especially at work?
  • LinkedIn Is Being the Change It Wants to See for Women in Tech
    The bad news is that STEM has a woman problem. The good news is that everyone is pretty aware of it now and some companies are trying to fix this problem. Last year, LinkedIn announced its Women in Tech (WIT) initiative, which aims to empower the women in tech roles at the company to transform themselves, their careers, and the company – and, by golly, it seems to be working! We'll take a look at how LinkedIn is "tackling this imbalance head-on" and making a difference for women in tech, now and in the future.
  • What Nasty Gal Can Teach Us About the Importance of Corporate Culture
    If there's anyone who understands the term "rags to riches," it's Nasty Gal founder Sophia Amoruso, who built an online apparel empire from the ground up. However, according to some current and former Nasty Gal employees, the company's once-vibrant corporate culture isn't what it used to be, thanks to layoffs and restructuring. We'll examine how a company's culture can quickly go south and how to protect yourself from being blindsided in your career.
  • Queen Bee Syndrome Is Not a Thing
    Women, amirite? When they're not weeping or scheming, they're tearing each other down at work. Or, at least, that's how the theory goes. It's called Queen Bee Syndrome, and it's occupied a place in workplace lore for as long as women have been represented in the labor force. There's just one problem. A recent study shows that it's probably not true.
  • Tweet Like a Man, and Get More Retweets
    A recent study showed that men get retweeted more than women. The question is, why? We'll examine the science behind why tweets published by men are, on average, more popular than those by women and how professionals can apply this knowledge to their enhance their career potential, regardless of gender.
  • The Best #DistractinglySexy Tweets

    After Nobel Prize winner Sir Tim Hunt made headlines with a long, public and shockingly sexist diatribe about why he thought women were more of a distraction than a benefit in labs, hundreds of female scientists have taken to Twitter to call him out on his comments. These female STEM workers are posting photos of themselves at work, decked out in their daily uniforms of lab coats, hazmat suits, hairnets and goggles, with the hashtag #DistractinglySexy

  • All Stay-at-Home Parents Should Get a 'Wife Bonus'
    Someday, Dorothy will pull back the curtain on the internet and we'll discover not a man pulling levers, but the greatest communication tool of the 21st century, entirely powered by human outrage. Look no further than the recent flap over social researcher Wednesday Martin's forthcoming book Primates of Park Avenue, which examines the phenomenon of the "glam SAHM" – real Real Housewives who probably don't change a lot of diapers, but spend their time managing the careers of the future one percent. The inspiration for the furor? Like their financier husbands, these ladies apparently get a cash bonus for their efforts.
  • 5 Things Working Mothers Really Want in Their Careers
    Women comprise nearly half of today's workforce. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 47.7 percent of households are dual-income, with both the husband and wife working. What's more, approximately 70 percent of these women are also mothers, who handle a vast majority of the household responsibilities along with their careers. It's not surprising, then, that working mothers are struggling to keep up with the high demands of juggling their personal and professional lives simultaneously. Here's what working mothers need in order to get a fair shot at attaining their goals in and out of the workplace.
  • 3 Ways Veep's Amy Brookheimer Is Every Working Woman's Hero
    Unconscious bias really screws things up for women in the workplace, but the battle is not over just yet. Thanks to the prevalence of more leading ladies on the big screen and on TV who play strong, successful working women, the unconscious bias isn't so unconscious anymore. We'll take a look at three ways Veep's powerhouse character, Amy Brookheimer, is showing working women everywhere that being tenacious, unapologetic, and "bossy" is nothing to be afraid of in their careers.
  • Millennials and Women Don't Negotiate Salary: Here's Why That's Important
    Negotiating salary does more than just net you more money in the short-term; in the long-term, it leads to important financial advances that are hard to come by any other way. You won't just feel the impact of the extra income during your first year of employment; it will continue to be a factor in increases going forward, as many raises and bonuses are calculated based on a percentage of salary.
  • The 5 Best States for Working Moms [infographic]
    American working moms have it tough, no matter where they live. The U.S. lags behind every other developed nation when it comes to maternity leave. The United States has no federally mandated paid leave, and the Family and Medical Leave Act provides only 12 weeks of unpaid leave for qualified workers. Work for a company with fewer than 50 employees, or find yourself pregnant at a new job, and you might be out of luck. At the state level, however, some places are easier for working moms to call home than others.
  • Chore Wars: Why Are Women Still Doing All the Housework?
    A recent Working Mother survey found that today's household responsibilities (a.k.a. chores) have not changed much since the 1950s, which wouldn't be such an alarming finding if women didn't make up nearly half of the American workforce. We'll take a look at how the responsibility of keeping a house and home, like Mom and Grandma did, puts a damper on women's careers and causes friction in their personal lives, as well. Listen up, lads … this one's for you, too. (Hint, hint.)
  • 4 Ways the Geller Law Group Helps Women Have It All
    Women accounted for just 16.5 percent of law partners in 2013, despite the fact that they graduated from law school in equal numbers during the previous decade. Being a law partner inducts you into a high-pressure system with long hours and limited flexibility. It's the kind of job that practically requires a stay-at-home spouse in order to keep any kind of a personal life running smoothly. But, that arrangement isn't available to everyone. Some ambitious lawyers are left wondering how they can do both – that is, be a lawyer and have a life, and maybe even a family. At the Geller Law Group, an all-woman firm, it just might be possible.
  • Hillary Clinton Fights Like a Woman for Paid Leave
    It was Mother's Day on Sunday, so it's probably not really surprising that Hillary Clinton released a video about her mother (and daughter and granddaughter). But, set against the birth of her granddaughter, she also briefly retells a story about a nurse who said, "Thank you for fighting for paid family leave." Is it just political posturing, or can we finally hope for some resolution to the shameful state of family leave in the U.S.?
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Roxie Hunt, Hair Stylist/DIY Hair Mogul
    Most hair stylists cut and color hair. For Roxie Jane Hunt, however, shears and color baths were just the beginning. Over the past decade, the Pacific Northwest-based stylist, writer, entrepreneur, and mother of two has used her cutting and coloring chops as the springboard for a bonafide DIY hair empire that extends far beyond the walls of a salon or the conventional tools of her trade.
  • 3 Pieces of Career Advice From Famous Mothers, on Mother's Day
    To paraphrase Mark Twain, when you're a kid, your mother doesn't know anything – but it's surprising how wise she gets, as you grow older yourself. No wonder, then, that many of us grown-up "kids" turn to dear old Mom when the going gets tough. Here, in honor of Mother's Day, we present some of the best career advice famous moms have to offer.
  • 'Silicon Valley' Illustrates Why Salary Transparency Is So Important
    HBO's hit comedy, Silicon Valley, always features pitch-perfect parodies of the tech industry, but this week's episode, The Lady, focused on a topic near and dear to PayScale's heart: salary transparency. This most recent episode not only entertains, but illustrates what happens when employees don't know why their employer pays the way it does.
  • McMaster University Is Giving Female Employees a $3,515 Raise to Correct for the Gender Wage Gap
    A great deal of research has surfaced lately showing that the gender wage gap remains a persistent problem. But, few organizations are making an effort to identify the extent of the issue in their own business, and make adjustments.