• 3 Things Working Women Should Do to Feel More Empowered
    Despite the fact that women make up nearly half of the workforce, they still are severely underrepresented in leadership roles. In fact, women make up "only 14.6 percent of executive officers, 8.1 percent of top earners, and 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs," reports Forbes, which means working women have slim pickings when it comes to female role models in their careers. However, that doesn't mean that women can't feel empowered in their careers – it just means they have to learn to be the role models, themselves. Here's how working women can become the change they want to see in the corporate world.
  • Harriet Tubman's Image Appearing on the $20 Bill Is a Really Big Deal
    If you didn't know anything about the history of our country, you might think it was pretty strange to see that so many of us are actually quite moved by the decision to make Harriet Tubman the new face of the $20. After a lengthy process, and a passionate campaign, Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew announced that an image of Tubman will appear on the front of the $20 bill, with Jackson represented on the back. Here's why this is about more than just money, and what you should know.
  • Now It's Personal: Check Out This Gender Pay Gap Calculator
    The gender pay gap is not an abstract idea. It is, in fact, a real problem. However, it's hard to know exactly how the wage gap has played out for each of us as individuals, which makes the reality (and the gravity) of the situation harder to fully grasp.
  • 5 Things Working Moms Need to Feel Empowered In and Out of the Workplace
    If you're a working mom, you already know how hard it can be to juggle priorities successfully. For starters, motherhood has launched you into a whole new dimension of exhaustion. You probably don't even recognize your own reflection in the mirror anymore, and neither do your co-workers. The piles of dishes and laundry are starting to resemble the Leaning Tower of Pisa, and every day you're just hoping and praying that no one stops by unexpectedly. You're not completely sure when the last time you showered was – but who cares, because everyone's alive and fed, right? This survival mentality is all too common for working moms, and it usually results in them feeling defeated, stressed to the max, and completely exhausted – which isn't a great combination for anyone's career or well-being. But it doesn't have to be this way. Here's what moms need in order to have the lives and careers they deserve.
  • Meet the Winners of PayScale's Women in STEM Scholarship
    Through many studies at PayScale, we have found that there are fewer women entering and staying in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) jobs, even though there is more attention on the subject than ever. Because of this, we were inspired to create a scholarship that is exclusively for women heading into STEM who plan to pursue a meaningful career in those fields. Out of over 7,000 applicants, PayScale has awarded two exceptional young women a $2,000 scholarship to help them pursue their STEM education and follow their dreams. Read about each of the scholarship winners to see why they impressed us so much.
  • Working Moms Are Superheroes, and Working Dads Are the Robin to Their Batman
    Last week, one of our excellent writers, Leah Arnold-Smeets, penned a great piece on the struggles of being a working mom. As a working dad, it got me thinking.
  • Yes, the Gender Pay Gap Is Real, and No, It's Not Women's Fault
    Women don't ask, so they don't get. Or: women should wait their turn, and let karma sort it out. Or: women choose low-paying jobs, and/or work fewer hours, so they shouldn't expect to be paid as much as a man. There's just one problem with all of these explanations for why the gender pay gap isn't real, or at least, isn't really an issue that needs solving: they're all nonsense.
  • These Terrible #EqualPayDay Tweets Will Make You Cringe
    Even though research and data from multiple organizations have found that there is in fact a significant gender pay gap in America, not everyone believes in numbers. And with the power of the internet and the hashtag #EqualPayDay, we get to see how some people really feel about the gender pay gap and equal pay for women. Hold on to your unicorns, people, because the debate starts ... now.
  • The Gender Pay Gap Is Worse for Women of Color
    When we talk about pay inequity, especially on Equal Pay Day, we generally talk about the differences between men's earnings and women's earnings – meaning all men and all women, without regard to race. To really unpack the problem, however, we need to dig further into the data and look at how race and ethnicity impacts earnings. Bottom line: the gender pay gap is particularly bad for women of color.
  • Video: Equal Pay Day and Candy Bars

    On average, U.S. women make $.74 on the dollar compared to men.

    Some studies say more, and some less. But the fact that women earn less than men in general is not a myth; it's an inarguable fact.

    That said, it's a fact that's used out of context or misunderstood. A lot.

    While it's true that, typically, women make less than men for doing the same jobs, that discrepancy is not nearly as large as the $.74 to the dollar figure. This oft-cited figure comes from the fact that men and women tend to hold different jobs.

  • #EqualPayDay: 10 Quotes to Inspire You to Fight for Pay Equity

    Equal Pay Day is the date when women's pay symbolically "catches up" with men's earnings from the previous year. This year, April 12 is the big day: the average woman has now made as much money, from Jan 1, 2015 until today, as the average man did by New Year's Eve 2015.

    There are a lot of reasons why women earn less than men. PayScale's report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap, show that even in similar roles, controlling for education, experience, and hours worked, women make less money than men. Unconscious bias is a factor, as is "job choice"; women are more likely than men to work at low-paying jobs, and less likely than men to be in leadership roles.

  • When Being a Working Mom Is the Pits, Here's What You Need to Remember
    Working mothers do indeed have it all – if by "having it all," you mean having both sides of a double-edged sword. Women are still fighting for equal opportunity and equitable pay, so when you pile on the added pressure of balancing a career and family, there's enough guilt there to drive anyone mad … and sad. If you choose (or "choose") to return to work after having a baby, you're going to have to accept that your decision will have its ups and its downs. Here's what you need to know to get through those times when you start to doubt whether you're cut out to be a working mom.
  • 3 Career Lessons for Working Women From Hillary Clinton (Even If You're Voting for Someone Else)
    Understatement of the election year: Hillary Clinton is a polarizing figure. For some, she's inspirational – potentially the first female president, a woman who can get things done, the most accomplished candidate in terms of raw political experience. People in this camp tend to say things like, "If the presidential race were a job interview, you'd have to hire her, no question." But, then, of course, there's the other perspective, which says that she's not trustworthy, that she's made bad decisions when it counted, and that she might have broken the law. People who agree with this point of view tend to say things like, "She should be indicted." Today, we're not here to talk about whether either of these takes is right. We're here to talk about Hillary Clinton, the leader, and what working women can learn from her – yes, even if they're voting for Bernie or Cruz or Kasich or Trump, or writing in "Wonder Woman" and calling it a day.
  • Twitter Offers 20 Weeks of Paid Parental Leave for Moms and Dads
    Families were never as "traditional" as politicians or 20th century stereotypes would have us believe. Throughout human history, primary caregivers have come in all shapes, sizes, genders, and ages. Until recently, however, it was pretty hard for even high-earning executives at elite U.S. companies to get paid time off for a new baby – especially if they weren't female and/or hadn't given birth to the child. But all that is changing. Today, Twitter joins the ranks of tech companies like Facebook, Netflix, and Microsoft, in offering fully paid parental leave for any parent who wants time off to care for a new baby.
  • The U.S. Women's National Soccer Team and the Absurdity of the Gender Pay Gap

    The gender pay gap is a complicated issue. Though it's partly caused by the fact that men are more likely to hold higher-paying jobs, it's also true that women are, on average, paid less for performing the same jobs as men. The solution to the gap is often summed up at its most basic as "equal pay for equal work," meaning assuming all else is equal, a woman performing the same job as a man and achieving the same results should receive the same pay. If that woman outperforms her male counterpart, her salary should increase commensurate with her performance, and vice versa. That's easy to understand. Seems fair. Makes sense. Gender should not factor into pay whatsoever.

    The U.S. Women's National Soccer Team is putting that idea to the test: On Thursday five star players on the team filed a wage-discrimination action against the U.S. Soccer Federation with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

  • Why Aren't There More Women in Leadership Roles?
    We all know that there are fewer women at the top than men, but it's still shocking to see the actual numbers. Only 22 of Fortune 500 CEOs are women, and only three – Indra Nooyi of PepsiCo, Ursula Burns of Xerox, and Lisa Su of Advanced Micro Devices – are women of color. Women aren't just underrepresented in business leadership roles, either; they also make up just 19 percent of the U.S. Congress and 26 percent of college presidents. Recently, the American Association of University Women released a report, Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership to examine why there are so few female leaders, and what we can do to close the gap.
  • What Buffer's Gender Pay Gap Can Tell Us About Unconscious Bias
    Pay transparency is supposed to help companies close the gender pay gap. By being open about their compensation philosophy, sometimes to the point of posting employee salaries for everyone to see, decision-makers hope to catch pay inequities before they become entrenched. Buffer, the social media management tool provider, is one of the companies that's most publicly committed to transparency, publishing not only their salary formula, but a public spreadsheet of every salary at the company, from the CEO on down – which is why the company was taken aback to discover that female employees make less than males.
  • Amazon Reveals Pay Data After All, Shows Virtually No Gender Pay Gap
    Earlier this week, the Securities and Exchange Commission rejected Amazon's request to keep their pay data private, after Arjuna Capital filed a shareholder resolution to request that data. Yesterday, Amazon announced that it will share pay data – and that women at the company currently make 99.9 cents for every dollar male employees earn. Amazon also revealed that minority employees make 100.1 cents for every dollar earned by white employees.
  • When an Occupation Becomes Female-Dominated, Pay Declines
    During any debate about the gender pay gap, one argument will eventually emerge: women make less than men because they choose lower-paying jobs. But what if it turns out that women aren't so much choosing low-paying jobs as working at jobs that are low-paid precisely because there are more women in those occupations? If that sounds far-fetched, one study, recently discussed at The Upshot in The New York Times, might change your mind. Researchers analyzed 50 years of U.S. Census data and found that pay drops when professions move from predominantly male to female – in short, if women do a job, it's likely to be low-paid, for no other reason than that women's work is undervalued.
  • Guess Which Company Doesn't Want to Reveal Its Gender Pay Data?
    There is a big movement for tech companies to publicly share data about the gender and racial diversity of their employees. However, while some companies are using this moment of crisis to show commitment to developing a more diverse, more productive workforce, others are less than eager to disclose numbers. In fact, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) just rejected a request from tech giant Amazon for exemption from a request from one of their investors to disclose gender pay data.

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