• These 5 Jobs Have the Worst Gender Wage Gap
    Women make about 80 percent of what men earn, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is a big improvement over 30 years ago, when the number was 65.7 percent, but far from pay equity. PayScale's research on the gender wage gap shows that some of the continued disparity between male and female pay is due to occupational "choice," i.e. women opting for lower-paying jobs that give back and allow more flexibility. But lower pay for women can't entirely be explained by job type. In fact, some of the highest-paying industries also feature the largest pay gaps.
  • 5 Career Lessons From Leslie Knope
    The last episode of Parks and Recreation airs tonight, and while the show was never a runaway ratings hit, it holds a special place in many people's hearts. In no small part, this is because of its heroine, Leslie Knope, whose relentless energy and enthusiasm for even the drudge work involved in government service was an inspiration for every lady who's ever decorated her cubicle with pictures of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Hillary Clinton. Plus, she loves waffles: "We need to remember what's important in life: friends, waffles, work. Or waffles, friends, work. Doesn't matter, but work is third." Priorities!
  • Oscar-Winner Patricia Arquette Calls for an End to the Gender Wage Gap
    Oscar speeches are, for the most part, pretty boring. There's only so much a star can say during the 50 or 60 seconds they're allowed, before the "shut up" music swells. This year, however, Best Supporting Actress winner Patricia Arquette chose to make the most of her minute, and used her speech as a platform to call for wage equality for women.
  • 'Women Make Better Leaders,' Says Research (and Mr. Wonderful of Shark Tank)
    "Women make better CEOs." These fine words come from none other than Kevin O'Leary, better known as Mr. Wonderful on ABC's The Shark Tank. O'Leary holds an impressive business portfolio, and 55 percent of the CEOs in it are women. Why, then, are women so exceedingly underrepresented in high-level, leadership positions still to this day? One ongoing study examined just that.
  • Meet the YouTube Millionaires
    Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)
  • We Need More Women in Tech, and Here's What You Can Do About It
    Women are less likely than men to go into STEM careers, but it's not from a lack of initial interest or talent. Somewhere along the way, girls and women are turning in other directions, with the result that only about 18 percent of women earn degrees in computer science and 19 percent earn engineering degrees, according to the National Girls Collaborative Project.
  • The Birds and Bees of the Modern Office Romance
    In Mike Nichol's endearingly unrealistic '80s romcom Working Girl, Melanie Griffith portrays Tess McGill, an inexperienced but savvy young professional embattled in a competition for professional (and romantic) success with her powerful, idea-stealing boss Katherine Parker (Sigourney Weaver). The moral of the story? Do the right -- albeit slightly duplicitous -- thing, and you get not only your dream job, but also the guy you knew you always deserved.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Wisdom From a Professional Matchmaker, Balancing Work and Marriage, and Learning to Love Yourself
    Wish you felt more passionate about your work? Maybe it's time to make Hallmark's favorite random holiday into a celebration of career love, instead. In this week's very special Valentine's Day edition of PayScale's blog roundup, we have insight into dealing with difficult clients (courtesy of a former professional matchmaker), the financial and emotional risks of starting a business with your own funds, and tips for defeating impostor syndrome.
  • Facebook and LinkedIn Team Up to Help Women in Tech
    The two social network powerhouses, Facebook and LinkedIn, are joining forces to launch programs that will encourage more women to pursue degrees and careers in what has long been a man's world -- the world of tech. Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg (COO) and LinkedIn's Jeffrey Weiner (CEO) are launching mentoring and support programs at colleges to inspire more women to pursue tech-related education in hopes that they will, one day, fill the thousands of job availabilities in the heavily male-dominant tech industry.
  • Sexual Harassment in the Workplace: Should You Let Them Chase You Away?
    As many as one in four women have experienced sexual harassment at work, according to one poll. In some industries, those numbers are worse: a 2014 report from The Restaurant Opportunities Center United found that 70 percent of female food service workers experienced harassment from their bosses, and 90 percent experienced it from customers.
  • The Best Teams Have Women on Them
    Working in groups is part of everyday life, both personally and professionally. For instance, a family must work as a unit to maintain an orderly household, and, likewise, professionals must utilize teamwork to accomplish company goals. So, what makes a group successful? One study found the secret ingredient: the more women, the better.
  • 'A Man Wouldn't': What Women Need to Know About Negotiating Salary
    Recently, a friend emailed me to say that she had received a job offer from a company she'd been working for on a contract basis. The offer was still taking shape; in a week's time, she'd have to sit down and have the dreaded salary negotiation discussion. Her question was one that PayScale's users ask again and again: what's the magic salary number, the one that will neither cheat the asker nor shut down negotiations entirely? After asking her a few questions about the job and its responsibilities, and factoring in that it was in New York, one of our finest and most expensive cities, I pointed her to PayScale's Research Center to determine a salary range -- and more importantly, a drop-dead number, the salary below which she wouldn't feel comfortable taking the job. "Don't take less than that," I told her. "A man wouldn't."
  • Super Bowl Ads Show Changing Gender Roles at Home and at Work
    This year's Super Bowl commercials were all about the dad-vertising. Social media spheres were in a complete uproar over the latest string of ads featuring dads who were caring for their children -- swimming, potty-training, brushing hair, comforting, and hugging. There wasn't a dry eye in the house, according to more than one post.
  • 3 Lessons From Ivanka Trump’s #WomenWhoWork Campaign
    Being a working woman takes on a whole new meaning in today's fast-paced, technologically advanced age. There's much more responsibility to deal with and so many more expectations to live up to when trying to juggle life and work. See how Ivanka Trump’s new #WomenWhoWork initiative aims to end the unrealistic stereotypes of working women and, instead, empower them to live authentic, successful lives.
  • Why Fear Success?

    Why Fear Success?
    It may seem completely counterintuitive, but one of the greatest obstacles to success is often fear that we may succeed. It's that petrified stagnation that prevents us from looking for another job, pursuing advancement, and even taking actions we know will bring about change. Perhaps we've become so accustomed to failure that the idea of success is unbelievable. We don't want to get our hopes up, and we may also fear the side effects that would come with success.
  • Working Moms Are Still Getting the Short End of the Stick
    Let's face the facts: being a working mother is exhausting and, oftentimes, completely defeating. Many women put their own career and life aspirations on hold to raise children, but very few of these ladies actually speak openly about the endless struggles they face on a daily basis. Here are the facts that you should know about the realities of working mothers and what you can do to help.
  • 3 Things You Don't Know About Negotiating Salary
    To compile the recently issued Salary Negotiation Guide, PayScale asked 31,000 people whether they'd ever negotiated their salary. Fifty-seven percent said they had not. Given that not negotiating salary can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of a lifetime -- and that 75 percent of people who ask get at least some kind of salary bump -- it obviously makes sense to hit the bargaining table before you accept a new job offer or let your annual review go by without initiating a discussion about money. Still reluctant? Arm yourself with the facts.
  • The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs
    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.
  • Getting Heard: 5 Tips for Meetings
    Working women, have you ever attempted to present an idea in a meeting, only to be interrupted, shut down, or ignored, seemingly based on nothing more than your gender? If so, you have experienced "speaking while female," a term coined by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant to describe women's frequent experience of having their thoughts discredited by male co-workers and bosses. While you can't singlehandedly undo generations of gender bias, there are certain things you can do to improve your chances of being heard.
  • #SOTU 2015: Middle-Class Economics and Expanding Opportunity
    "The shadow of crisis has passed," said President Obama, in last night's State of the Union address. "And the state of the union is strong." While receiving standing ovations for job numbers (and getting in an ad-libbed dig at Republicans about winning the presidency), Obama outlined a vision for the country that focused on middle-class growth.