• 3 Facts You Don't Know About #WomeninSTEM
    You know that STEM jobs are heavily male-dominated, and also – generally speaking – high-paying, high-growth occupations. The lack of representation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math jobs is one reason why the gender pay gap persists. You've probably also heard that tech companies are trying various things to create a more diverse workforce, in terms of hiring and promoting women and people of color, from Slack's plan to build tools that catch inequities early on to Salesforce's $3 million commitment to closing its internal gender pay gap. But there's a lot you don't know about the history and current state of women in tech, in particular. Today, on the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, let's take a look at some very nontrivial trivia.
  • Is a Lack of Leisure Time Holding You Back in Your Career?
    More American women are working full-time, but that doesn't mean that their family lives have caught up. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in households with children under 6, moms put in an hour of physical childcare per day, while dads did 23 minutes. The chore breakdown was similarly unequal; on an average day, women spent 47 more minutes per day on household activities like food prep and laundry. Why is this a big deal? Well, in addition to making it harder for women to put in extra time at the office and get ahead at work, lack of leisure time means less room for creativity and innovation.
  • 5 Reasons Why Your Employer Should Embrace Diversity
    Building a diverse company isn't just the right thing to do; according to research from Bersin by Deloitte, it's also pretty good for business. In a recent article for Forbes, contributor Josh Bersin wrote about why smart companies are making diversity and inclusion a top priority. Here's why your employer should be on board.
  • One Company Offers a Work-Life Balance Solution for Moms: Part-Time Jobs
    Being a working mother in America is no easy feat. Not only are there extremely limited or no paid leave options for a vast majority of working parents, but the high cost of childcare and long American workday force many women to leave their careers behind to care for their children. One company is trying to change that for working mothers. How? By giving moms the opportunity to work part-time.
  • Why You Should Care That More Women Are Working Full-Time
    Women have dominated part-time work for the past decade or so, and this has played a role in why the gender wage gap persists and why women are so underrepresented in upper-level, high-earning jobs. However, recent reports show that more women are making a shift from part-time to full-time work. This shift is great for the economy, of course – but, more importantly, it's an indicator that we are getting that much closer to workplace equality for working women in America. Here's what you need to know.
  • Obama Plans to Fight the Gender Pay Gap With Data
    Exactly seven years ago today, President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, amending the Civil Rights Act to alter the statute of limitations for discrimination claims. It was the first bill he signed into law as president, and an important tool for women fighting to close the gender pay gap. Today, Obama extends those protections by announcing a new rule to require companies with 100 or more employees to furnish the government with pay data on gender, race, and ethnicity.
  • Negotiating While Female: How to Get the Salary You Deserve
    First things first: despite what you might have heard, women are not worse negotiators than men. They're not even that much less likely to ask for a raise. Data collected for PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide showed that women reported negotiating salary nearly as often as men: 42 percent of women and 45 percent of men said they'd asked for a raise in their current field. However, research has shown that women are penalized more severely in terms of social costs when they engage in behaviors that appear "aggressive" or "unlikeable" – such as, for example, asking for more cash.
  • Companies Insist on Collaboration, So Women Do More
    In workplaces around the country, it's not uncommon for employers to encourage or even insist on a collaborative environment. In fact, studies show that time spent on collaborative tasks in the office rose by roughly 50 percent over the last 20 years. However, there's just one little problem: women are the ones getting stuck with the bulk of the work.
  • Fair Pay and Healthcare: 4 Takeaways From the 4th Democratic Debate
    Watching the latest Democratic debate less than a week after the Republican debate, you're immediately struck by the differences between the two parties' events at this stage of the election cycle. It's not just the unsurprising fact that conservatives and liberals disagree on the major issues; it's that the Democrats, who have only three candidates vying for the nomination, have enough time to get into (slightly) more in-depth discussions about their proposals. Barring that, they've at least got more room, both metaphorically and physically on the stage, to argue with one another.
  • #BigBlockofCheeseDay: Jobs, the Gender Pay Gap, Family Leave, and More
    If you love cheese and you love politics, today is your day on Twitter. OK, fine, the cheese part is just a fun historical reference, wrapped up in a hashtag; Big Block of Cheese Day, first coined on the show The West Wing, dates back to an open house held by President Andrew Jackson in 1837. The reception was Jackson's last in office, and featured a 1,400-pound wheel of cheese and 10,000 guests from the general public. Today, of course, we don't need fromage and an open door to speak to our government directly – we just need Twitter. For the third year in a row, advisors like Vice President Biden and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez took to Twitter to answer the public's questions.
  • What College Students Need to Know About the Gender Pay Gap
    Before I was aware of the gender wage gap, I thought – as any rational person would – that employees would be paid the same for their same quality of work regardless of gender. But alas, this is not the case. The reality is, at least for a few years, the gender pay gap is here to stay. So that invites the question: as a young woman looking to enter the workforce in a few years, what should I do about the gender pay gap?
  • Just Stop Saying Sorry in Emails, With This App
    Do you ever look at your emails long after you've hit "send" and cringe, not because of the occasional typo, but because your message reads more like an apology than a statement? If you're a working woman, the answer is probably "yes." Now, thanks to Cyrus Innovation's new Chrome plug-in Just Not Sorry, we can catch those second-nature apologies and qualifiers before we email them, not after.
  • What You Can Learn From the Highest-Paid Women in Music
    Even though most of us can't compare to the highest-paid women in the music industry in 2015, we can still learn something from their business savvy and success. Forbes has details on the top earners, and we offer some tips on what some of them have done so well in 2015, even though none of them even released an album last year.
  • Could Crying at Work Get You What You Want?
    We all know there's no crying in baseball, but could getting emotional at work actually work to your advantage? Politicians have been known to get a little verklempt at times, to make them seem more human and relatable and less like robots (or maybe they were really sad). It could stand to reason that the workplace is an OK place to let down your emotional barriers from time to time.
  • What Today's Kids Say They Want to Be When They Grow Up
    When you were younger, how did you answer the question, "What do you want to be when you grow up?" These days, there is a lot of evidence to suggest that this is a question we really shouldn't even be asking little kids; it might be sending the wrong message about identity. But, since the question persists, we might as well take a look at some of the answers kids are providing. They shed interesting light on the different messages boys and girls are receiving about potential career options, and how these messages have changed over time.
  • 5 Shocking Statistics PayScale Uncovered in 2015
    At PayScale, we really love data. Throughout 2015, we used data to tackle some of the most debated topics in the career world, as well as to shed some light on common misconceptions about data. PayScale's reports cover everything from the gender pay gap to the cost and reward of higher education. And sometimes, we analyze qualitative data, like how workers feel about their jobs. For example, which jobs are the most meaningful, and more importantly, which are the most meaningless? And, do women really only make 78 cents for every dollar a man makes?
  • These 9 Feel-Good Career Stories Will Give You Hope for 2016
    With 2015 coming to an end and a new year just around the corner, it's nice to reflect on some of the positive things that have happened in the career world this year, from companies offering increased paid family leave to millennials teaching us what success should look like in the future. Here are a few of the top career stories of 2015 to help close out the year on a good note.
  • Ladies, If We Want Change, We Have to Do It Ourselves
    Women have been fighting for equality for some time now and they show no signs of stopping until the battle has been won, once and for all. Women still face many inequities today that prevent them from reaching their full potential in their personal and professional lives, but it's not only women who are negatively impacted by gender imbalances – business and the economy as a whole suffer when women are deprived of the same opportunities as men. If you want things to change sooner than later, ladies, it's time to take matters into your own hands – because, as Laurel Thatcher Ulrich said, "Well-behaved women seldom make history."
  • Lena Dunham and Emma Stone Discuss Nicknames in the Workplace
    Hopefully, it's a rare occurrence these days for a male co-worker or boss to summon a woman at the office with a demeaning nickname like "sweetie," or "honey," or (heaven forbid) "baby." Unfortunately though, it does still happen.
  • 5 Ways You Can End the Gender Pay Gap
    Regardless of how you look at the data, women make less than men in their careers and we have to do something to fix this issue. As the great Mahatma Gandhi once said, "Be the change that you wish to see in the world," so here are five ways to help you be that change and end the gender pay gap once and for all.

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