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Ebusiness Trends in Job Hunting

The other day I overheard a woman in a coffee shop calling "help wanted" ads out of the newspaper with her cell phone.  I could only hear what was said on her end, but it wasn't promising:  "Umm, no, I don't have a resume."  "I don't know what speed I can type." It was probably not one of the better executive administrative assistant job searches. Most people are better prepared than she was (I hope), but may still have a hard time finding employment and/or dealing with job hunting frustrations.

Forbes.com recently covered some ebusiness trends in job hunting and suggested ways to boost a flagging job search. Most jobs are not filled through classified ads, but through networking. Like it or not, it's who you know, or who you just met. Some executive job coaches recommend three to five networking meetings weekly. Just like dating, job hunting and successful internet job searches are often a numbers game.

Would your salary last if you were job hunting for over a year?  Find out with the PayScale's full salary survey.

Job Hunting for Over a Year

How long should it take to find a new job? There's no exact time line, but according to Jo Bennett of the executive-search firm Battalia Winston International, it usually takes around 3-4 months of job hunting for middle managers, 2-3 months for people with five years of experience, and 6 months to a year for senior managers, as there are fewer positions at the top.

Freelance Job Searches

According to Forbes.com, recruiters may not have anything full-time right when you need it, but may have part-time or freelance work available. The temp position might turn into a full-time job, but even if it doesn't, you can network with more people. I had a friend who temped at Warner Bros. Records and was offered a full-time job.  Also, you can fill gaps in your resume with freelance work as "consulting."

Dealing with Job Hunting Frustrations

As in dating, not being called back - after a  job interview - can be depressing.  Forbes.com suggests volunteering in one of your profession's trade organizations. While working for free may seem absurd, you'll be surrounded by people in your field and you will probably hear of jobs. Maybe they need help organizing a project or need articles written. Writing articles is a great reason to call people in your biz.

Job Hunting Social Aspects

Forbes.com also recommends making contacts by attending professional conferences. Conferences can be expensive, but think of it as an investment in your career. Just don't spread the word that you're looking for a job. Print up some business cards and send a follow-up e-mail after the conference asking about opportunities within the companies.

How To Get A Job With A Bad Credit Report

It used to be credit reports were used as a basis to obtain credit, but today they can also decide your job prospects. MSN.com recently ran an article about how to get a job with a bad credit report. Remember, you can dispute items on your credit report; surveys have shown that credit reports can be 50% inaccurate. Also, potential employers must get your permission to run a credit check, and must tell you if their decision not to hire was based on a credit report.

Top Websites for Job Searches and More

Most people are aware of the top websites for job searches - Monster.com, CareerBuilder.com, etc..., but you should also employ some other web tricks. It never hurts to have a web site displaying your portfolio. Also put appropriate keywords in your resume, that way your resume will pop up on google.com if a company does an Internet search for candidates.

How much should you be paid in your next job? The PayScale Salary Calculator is a quick and easy way to compare positions. When you want powerful salary data and comparisons customized for your exact position, be sure to build a complete profile by taking PayScale's full salary survey.

Cheers,

Dr. Al Lee

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