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A Yahoo Employee Answers the Question: Why Does Anyone Still Work at Yahoo?

It's been kind of a rough couple of weeks, news-wise, for Yahoo. Back in April, the technology company laid off 2000 employees. Just this week, CEO Scott Thompson resigned amid allegations that he lied on his resume. Why would anyone still want to work there?

Gil Yehuda, Director of Open Source and Standards at Yahoo, gives a few pithy answers to that question in Forbes. Among the points he raises:


1. Changing jobs is a hassle, and best undertaken as seldom as possible. Every time you change jobs, you take a risk -- plus, you lose seniority, comfort with your work, and the time it takes to acclimate to a new position.

2. It's hard to be sure that you're leaving your old job for a better job. Sometimes, companies in turmoil recover, and you might find that an organization in flux offers more potential for positive change, personally.

 

But beyond all of that, Yehuda's best argument might be that leaving a company in trouble makes you a less appealing candidate to potential employers. His imaginary script of that employee's next job interview follows:

"So why did you leave your last job?"
"Well, the company was in turmoil. Bloggers were getting very nasty and attacking the company, and the comments on the blogs were really bad too. I felt demoralized working there."
"So if it fair to say that if we hired you and we ran into some turbulence, we should expect you to jump ship too?"
"... um no... I'd do my best to... um help... um... "

So basically, if you do decide you need to bail ... think of a better reason than bad press in the blogosphere.

More From PayScale:

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Yahoo

(Photo Credit: craigles75/Flickr)

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